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Simple way of estimating shutter and focus lag

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Anonymous
December 7, 2004 4:10:13 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

I saw a nice demo on TV of how to estimate shutter and focus lag on a
digital camera: put a paper arrow on a record turntable set to 33-1/3
rpm, and press the shutter button as the arrow passes a given point,
then check where the arrow shows up on the digital picture. One
revolution is 1.8 seconds, or 5ms per degree of rotation.

Not as accurate as the pros might need, but cheap and simple :) 
Anonymous
December 7, 2004 4:10:14 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Bryn James wrote:

> I saw a nice demo on TV of how to estimate shutter and
> focus lag on a digital camera: put a paper arrow on a record
> turntable set to 33-1/3 rpm, and press the shutter button as the
> arrow passes a given point, then check where the arrow shows
> up on the digital picture. One revolution is 1.8 seconds, or 5ms
> per degree of rotation.

Or use an analog stopwatch.
Anonymous
December 7, 2004 5:56:38 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

On Tue, 07 Dec 2004 13:10:13 GMT, Bryn James <fbjames@iee.org.uk>
wrote:

>I saw a nice demo on TV of how to estimate shutter and focus lag on a
>digital camera: put a paper arrow on a record turntable set to 33-1/3
>rpm, and press the shutter button as the arrow passes a given point,
>then check where the arrow shows up on the digital picture. One
>revolution is 1.8 seconds, or 5ms per degree of rotation.
>
>Not as accurate as the pros might need, but cheap and simple :) 

Nice one, but how can you tell it didn't go round three times?

....some of these digicams are *awfully slow*.

I'd actually like to do this test on my DV camera, I am sure it's near
a second and a half. But I don't know what a 'record turntable' is.

You'd need to repeat the test 3 or more times to see what influence
your own reaction time to trigger it has. Have 4 beers and repeat.

--
Owamanga!
Anonymous
December 7, 2004 5:59:26 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

"Bryn James" <fbjames@iee.org.uk> wrote in message
news:tlabr09sh4lkf7mh1ln6qr68lce1vvm79u@4ax.com...
> I saw a nice demo on TV of how to estimate shutter and focus lag on a
> digital camera: put a paper arrow on a record turntable set to 33-1/3
> rpm, and press the shutter button as the arrow passes a given point,
> then check where the arrow shows up on the digital picture. One
> revolution is 1.8 seconds, or 5ms per degree of rotation.
>
> Not as accurate as the pros might need, but cheap and simple :) 


Digital camera & record turntable owners.. A bit of an oxymoron isn't it?
(Superstar DJ's excluded)

How do I do it with my MP3 player?
Anonymous
December 7, 2004 10:11:54 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

"Ben Rum" <bundyrum75@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:31lunnF3b8i6rU1@individual.net...

>
> How do I do it with my MP3 player?


Get a friend to drop it off a multi story block and take a picture of it.
Count how many floors down it has passed on the picture and do the maths.
If you get it slightly wrong it won't make any difference.
--
For Welsh Military Flying visit .......
www.groups.yahoo.com/group/V-A-S/
Anonymous
December 8, 2004 3:42:01 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

On Tue, 07 Dec 2004 13:10:13 GMT, Bryn James <fbjames@iee.org.uk>
wrote:

>I saw a nice demo on TV of how to estimate shutter and focus lag on a
>digital camera: put a paper arrow on a record turntable set to 33-1/3
>rpm, and press the shutter button as the arrow passes a given point,
>then check where the arrow shows up on the digital picture. One
>revolution is 1.8 seconds, or 5ms per degree of rotation.
>
>Not as accurate as the pros might need, but cheap and simple :) 

Easier to just read the spec sheet or review data.
Anonymous
December 8, 2004 5:53:55 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Ben Rum wrote:
> "Bryn James" <fbjames@iee.org.uk> wrote in message
> news:tlabr09sh4lkf7mh1ln6qr68lce1vvm79u@4ax.com...
>> I saw a nice demo on TV of how to estimate shutter and focus lag on a
>> digital camera: put a paper arrow on a record turntable set to
>> 33-1/3 rpm, and press the shutter button as the arrow passes a given
>> point, then check where the arrow shows up on the digital picture.
>> One revolution is 1.8 seconds, or 5ms per degree of rotation.
>>
>> Not as accurate as the pros might need, but cheap and simple :) 
>
>
> Digital camera & record turntable owners.. A bit of an oxymoron isn't
> it? (Superstar DJ's excluded)
>
> How do I do it with my MP3 player?

MP3 will never be able to record the subtle nuance of an analog pickup
needle on a CCD...
Anonymous
December 8, 2004 8:58:33 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Ben Rum wrote:
> How do I do it with my MP3 player?
Tie the MP3 player to a ceiling fan? ;-)

- Siddhartha
Anonymous
December 8, 2004 10:19:07 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

On Tue, 07 Dec 2004 13:10:13 GMT, Bryn James <fbjames@iee.org.uk>
wrote:

>I saw a nice demo on TV of how to estimate shutter and focus lag on a
>digital camera: put a paper arrow on a record turntable set to 33-1/3
>rpm, and press the shutter button as the arrow passes a given point,
>then check where the arrow shows up on the digital picture. One
>revolution is 1.8 seconds, or 5ms per degree of rotation.
>
>Not as accurate as the pros might need, but cheap and simple :) 

http://www.shooting-digital.com/columns/schwartz/shutte...


-------------------------------------
Everything I know, and then some:
http://www.auctionmyths.com
Anonymous
December 8, 2004 2:17:55 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

On Wed, 08 Dec 2004 07:19:07 GMT, Dave Busch
<moc.seimmud4latigid@eriafresal> wrote:

>On Tue, 07 Dec 2004 13:10:13 GMT, Bryn James <fbjames@iee.org.uk>
>wrote:
>
>>I saw a nice demo on TV of how to estimate shutter and focus lag on a
>>digital camera: put a paper arrow on a record turntable set to 33-1/3
>>rpm, and press the shutter button as the arrow passes a given point,
>>then check where the arrow shows up on the digital picture. One
>>revolution is 1.8 seconds, or 5ms per degree of rotation.
>>
>>Not as accurate as the pros might need, but cheap and simple :) 
>
>http://www.shooting-digital.com/columns/schwartz/shutte...

And it can't compensate for the brain to finger delay. I got 0.2 and
1.0, but how much of that was my 44 yr old brain.
December 8, 2004 2:17:56 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

In article <7modr0968f8k8kehqb33tgir5mlej0ritn@4ax.com>, sec@nbnet.nb.ca
says...
> On Wed, 08 Dec 2004 07:19:07 GMT, Dave Busch
> <moc.seimmud4latigid@eriafresal> wrote:
>
> >On Tue, 07 Dec 2004 13:10:13 GMT, Bryn James <fbjames@iee.org.uk>
> >wrote:
> >
> >>I saw a nice demo on TV of how to estimate shutter and focus lag on a
> >>digital camera: put a paper arrow on a record turntable set to 33-1/3
> >>rpm, and press the shutter button as the arrow passes a given point,
> >>then check where the arrow shows up on the digital picture. One
> >>revolution is 1.8 seconds, or 5ms per degree of rotation.
> >>
> >>Not as accurate as the pros might need, but cheap and simple :) 
> >
> >http://www.shooting-digital.com/columns/schwartz/shutte...
>
> And it can't compensate for the brain to finger delay. I got 0.2 and
> 1.0, but how much of that was my 44 yr old brain.
>
>

Probably a good deal less than the delay in my 59 YO brain/body.

It does seem though to be a good thumbnail measurement for a
photographer/camera combination.


--
Larry Lynch
Mystic, Ct.
Anonymous
December 17, 2004 1:40:07 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

On Tue, 7 Dec 2004 14:59:26 -0000, "Ben Rum" <bundyrum75@yahoo.com>
wrote:

>
>"Bryn James" <fbjames@iee.org.uk> wrote in message
>news:tlabr09sh4lkf7mh1ln6qr68lce1vvm79u@4ax.com...
>> I saw a nice demo on TV of how to estimate shutter and focus lag on a
>> digital camera: put a paper arrow on a record turntable set to 33-1/3
>> rpm, and press the shutter button as the arrow passes a given point,
>> then check where the arrow shows up on the digital picture. One
>> revolution is 1.8 seconds, or 5ms per degree of rotation.
>>
>> Not as accurate as the pros might need, but cheap and simple :) 
>
>
>Digital camera & record turntable owners.. A bit of an oxymoron isn't it?
>(Superstar DJ's excluded)
>
>How do I do it with my MP3 player?
>
>
Simple, I used a ceiling fan with a mark on one of the four blades.
Set it for a suitable speed, count the number of full revolutions over
a precise time, then shoot the pic with that marked blade at the same
spot, and average the angular change. Convert that to time.

Olin McDaniel
!