Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

Can I Raid 0 multiple Ramdisks?

Last response: in Storage
Share
June 5, 2012 12:44:17 AM

I recently descovered RAMDisk and it is AMAZING! I already reached 5Gbs using a free RAMDisk Utility. The free version of this utility limits the size of the partition to 4Gb. Could i Raid 0 multiple 4Gb RAMDisks into one Raid 0 Ramdisk? The point here is to get more than 4Gb of working Ram Disk but if the speed increces too then that is just an added plus!! Or does anyone else know a free RamDisk utility that allows for a larger partition? Thanks

The Website i used was: http://memory.dataram.com/products-and-services/softwar...

More about : raid multiple ramdisks

a c 85 G Storage
June 5, 2012 1:23:20 AM

no. Ramdisk creates partitions within your system RAM. This is useful for storing temporary files that need to be accessed constantly but this is rather useless because your OS will automatically use spare RAM as a filesystem cache
June 5, 2012 1:27:35 AM

Pinhedd said:
no. Ramdisk creates partitions within your system RAM. This is useful for storing temporary files that need to be accessed constantly but this is rather useless because your OS will automatically use spare RAM as a filesystem cache


I wanted to use the Ram Disk to install Photoshop CS5.5 not to cache data
RAMDisk has settings that will make it a persistant volume. so when you shut down or restatrt the system it moves the stuff in the ramdisk to the drive that the opperating system is installed onto.
Related resources
a c 85 G Storage
June 5, 2012 1:31:32 AM

System RAM is volatile. As soon as you restart your computer it gets wiped. If you were to install photoshop to that ramdisk not only would you be preventing other applications from using that RAM but it would be wiped as soon as you restarted your computer but all of the other photoshop installation data would be left intact elsewhere with no program to point to.
June 5, 2012 1:35:06 AM

Pinhedd said:
System RAM is volatile. As soon as you restart your computer it gets wiped. If you were to install photoshop to that ramdisk not only would you be preventing other applications from using that RAM but it would be wiped as soon as you restarted your computer but all of the other photoshop installation data would be left intact elsewhere with no program to point to.



But when i install photoshop into the ramdisk EVERY file that relates to photoshop would go there and it would just move between drives right? on startup it would put it back and it would be referenced to the same place it was installed to.. right? or do i have that wrong?
a c 85 G Storage
June 5, 2012 1:58:11 AM

That's not how a RAMDisk works. Creating a RAMDisk just takes a chunk of your computer's volatile DRAM and creates a filesystem within it. You would have to reinstall Photoshop on every startup, which is pretty useless. If you just install Photoshop to your hard disk as normal the OS will use uncommitted DRAM (DRAM which has not been allocated to any applications, or reserved by any hardware or the kernel) to cache the most commonly accessed parts of the filesystem. Photoshop itself will use up as much DRAM as it needs to run. However, if that DRAM is being chewed up by a RAMDisk it won't be available and could hinder Photoshop's operation as it is forced to use hard disk space instead (known as swap space, or a pagefile). RAMDisks are only useful when you want to force something to be served from memory rather than from the hard disk, such as streaming media from a webserver. RAMDisks are no use at all for home users.
a c 277 G Storage
June 5, 2012 1:02:39 PM

Yes, you can. No, you shouldn't. You will be wasting memory that Photoshop should be using for its own purposes. PS will run much faster if you don't do this. Plus your system startup will take ten minutes.
June 5, 2012 11:20:15 PM

TStrausbaugh3203450 said:
But when i install photoshop into the ramdisk EVERY file that relates to photoshop would go there and it would just move between drives right? on startup it would put it back and it would be referenced to the same place it was installed to.. right? or do i have that wrong?

As long as the RAM disk software backs up the RAM disk image to a physical disk before shutdowns and restarts, it will work. Installing programs onto a RAM disk is a great way to improve application performance, as long as you have enough RAM installed in the system.

The RAID 0 thing is not going to help with a RAM disk. In fact, it will make performance worse.

I don't know of free software of that quality. I use Qsoft RAM disk Enterprise; it's worth paying for.
!