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First Mac?

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Anonymous
December 7, 2004 10:12:51 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

I'm a very long-time PC user and sometimes administrator for Windows servers
and UNIX and also a semi-pro digital sports photographer with some Photoshop
experience on a PC. I'm now considering buying my first Mac to use for
photography but I also need to learn OSX and how to support it in a
corporate environment.

While doing photography on location I use a Dell laptop in the press room to
edit and upload and it serves me fine. I was considering a Apple laptop but
1) I don't want to shell out too much and 2) I don't know that I'm getting
full benefit of the machine with a LCD which is not ideal for advanced
Photoshop work such and color management. So I'm thinking of going with an
eMac G4 with 256MB RAM and 40GB Hard Drive with CRT just to get me in the
door for about $750.00 and keep the Dell laptop for on location. Any
problems with the eMacs? Other suggestions?

Thanks!

More about : mac

Anonymous
December 7, 2004 10:12:52 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

In article <Tgntd.9965$_3.117280@typhoon.sonic.net>, you know who maybe
<nguser2u@spamnotAOL.com> wrote:

> I'm a very long-time PC user and sometimes administrator for Windows servers
> and UNIX and also a semi-pro digital sports photographer with some Photoshop
> experience on a PC. I'm now considering buying my first Mac to use for
> photography but I also need to learn OSX and how to support it in a
> corporate environment.
>
> While doing photography on location I use a Dell laptop in the press room to
> edit and upload and it serves me fine. I was considering a Apple laptop but
> 1) I don't want to shell out too much and 2) I don't know that I'm getting
> full benefit of the machine with a LCD which is not ideal for advanced
> Photoshop work such and color management. So I'm thinking of going with an
> eMac G4 with 256MB RAM and 40GB Hard Drive with CRT just to get me in the
> door for about $750.00 and keep the Dell laptop for on location. Any
> problems with the eMacs? Other suggestions?

with whatever mac you get, you want as much ram as you can afford.
512meg is probably the lowest thats useful, particularly with
photoshop, and 1gig or more is ideal. buy a cheaper mac (perhaps a used
or refurb one) and put more ram in it, if money is an issue. be sure to
check the refurb section at the apple store - there are often some very
good deals there.

emacs are fine, just big and heavy. if you have a monitor already, you
might want to look at a desktop mac. while even the low end g5 is more
money, its a *lot* faster than the emac, especially with photoshop. a
used g4 tower is cheaper and probably the same price range as the emac.
the emac is no slouch, just be sure whatever you get has plenty of ram.


you might also consider an ibook or powerbook. both can connect to
external monitors, but the powerbook has dvi out instead of vga and can
use both monitors rather than just mirroring the internal screen.
Anonymous
December 7, 2004 11:12:18 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

I've used wintel machines since about 1986. I got my first Mac - flat
panel G4 iMac - about three years ago. I added an iBook last summer,
and my 20" G5 iMac should be here any day.

Believe the hype - Macs are awesome. If I didn't need a wintel machine
for work stuff I wouldn't have one at all.
Related resources
Anonymous
December 7, 2004 11:43:40 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

"nospam" <nospam@nospam.invalid> wrote in message
news:071220041140285272%nospam@nospam.invalid...
> In article <Tgntd.9965$_3.117280@typhoon.sonic.net>, you know who maybe
> <nguser2u@spamnotAOL.com> wrote:
>
>> I'm a very long-time PC user and sometimes administrator for Windows
>> servers
>> and UNIX and also a semi-pro digital sports photographer with some
>> Photoshop
>> experience on a PC. I'm now considering buying my first Mac to use for
>> photography but I also need to learn OSX and how to support it in a
>> corporate environment.
>>
>> While doing photography on location I use a Dell laptop in the press room
>> to
>> edit and upload and it serves me fine. I was considering a Apple laptop
>> but
>> 1) I don't want to shell out too much and 2) I don't know that I'm
>> getting
>> full benefit of the machine with a LCD which is not ideal for advanced
>> Photoshop work such and color management. So I'm thinking of going with
>> an
>> eMac G4 with 256MB RAM and 40GB Hard Drive with CRT just to get me in the
>> door for about $750.00 and keep the Dell laptop for on location. Any
>> problems with the eMacs? Other suggestions?
>
> with whatever mac you get, you want as much ram as you can afford.
> 512meg is probably the lowest thats useful, particularly with
> photoshop, and 1gig or more is ideal. buy a cheaper mac (perhaps a used
> or refurb one) and put more ram in it, if money is an issue. be sure to
> check the refurb section at the apple store - there are often some very
> good deals there.
>
> emacs are fine, just big and heavy. if you have a monitor already, you
> might want to look at a desktop mac. while even the low end g5 is more
> money, its a *lot* faster than the emac, especially with photoshop. a
> used g4 tower is cheaper and probably the same price range as the emac.
> the emac is no slouch, just be sure whatever you get has plenty of ram.
>
>
> you might also consider an ibook or powerbook. both can connect to
> external monitors, but the powerbook has dvi out instead of vga and can
> use both monitors rather than just mirroring the internal screen.

Thanks, I'm so clueless on the Mac I was not even sure my 19" Viewsonic
would connect to it until I checked their website just now. OK, so a laptop
might be OK after all. Load up with RAM (just like a PC). Got it.
Anonymous
December 7, 2004 11:43:41 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Post your original query at
comp.sys.mac.hardware.misc
for helpful answers from people who use a variety of Macs. You can get
comments from people who have used the emac and can give you personal
experience.
--
Phil Stripling | email to the replyto address is presumed
The Civilized Explorer | spam and read later. email from this URL
http://www.cieux.com/ | http://www.civex.com/ is read daily.
Anonymous
December 8, 2004 1:25:38 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

"Phil Stripling" <phil_stripling@cieux.zzn.com> wrote in message
news:3qvfbdg34b.fsf@shell4.tdl.com...
> Post your original query at
> comp.sys.mac.hardware.misc
> for helpful answers from people who use a variety of Macs. You can get
> comments from people who have used the emac and can give you personal
> experience.

Throw me to the lions, eh? ;-)

OK, why not.
Anonymous
December 8, 2004 1:25:39 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

"you know who maybe" <nguser2u@spamnotAOL.com> writes:

> Throw me to the lions, eh? ;-)
>
> OK, why not.

Well, you've already gotten one reply. Mac users are friendly, and we're
_always_ interesting in subverting someone from the dark side. :->

--
Phil Stripling | email to the replyto address is presumed
The Civilized Explorer | spam and read later. email from this URL
http://www.cieux.com/ | http://www.civex.com/ is read daily.
Anonymous
December 8, 2004 1:41:21 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

In article <Tgntd.9965$_3.117280@typhoon.sonic.net>,
"you know who maybe" <nguser2u@spamnotAOL.com> wrote:

> I'm a very long-time PC user and sometimes administrator for Windows servers
> and UNIX and also a semi-pro digital sports photographer with some Photoshop
> experience on a PC. I'm now considering buying my first Mac to use for
> photography but I also need to learn OSX and how to support it in a
> corporate environment.
>
> While doing photography on location I use a Dell laptop in the press room to
> edit and upload and it serves me fine. I was considering a Apple laptop but
> 1) I don't want to shell out too much and 2) I don't know that I'm getting
> full benefit of the machine with a LCD which is not ideal for advanced
> Photoshop work such and color management. So I'm thinking of going with an
> eMac G4 with 256MB RAM and 40GB Hard Drive with CRT just to get me in the
> door for about $750.00 and keep the Dell laptop for on location. Any
> problems with the eMacs? Other suggestions?
>
> Thanks!

Most of the weird non-linearities are gone in recent LCDs and Mac OS has
built-in color correction for the display. The higher-end Apple laptops
have excellent color accuracy.

The one kink is that the OS X GUI is a RAM hog and its virtual memory
needs work. Figure that the OS will consume about 200MB of physical
RAM. 512MB is good for a typical user while power users need 1GB.
256MB running Photoshop will be sluggish.

(As for the day job, administrating OS X isn't hard. The only tricky
part is that a lot UNIX system configuration files have been modernized
into XML or the NetInfo database.)
Anonymous
December 8, 2004 1:49:59 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

In article <Tgntd.9965$_3.117280@typhoon.sonic.net>,
"you know who maybe" <nguser2u@spamnotAOL.com> wrote:

> I'm a very long-time PC user and sometimes administrator for Windows servers
> and UNIX and also a semi-pro digital sports photographer with some Photoshop
> experience on a PC. I'm now considering buying my first Mac to use for
> photography but I also need to learn OSX and how to support it in a
> corporate environment.
>
> While doing photography on location I use a Dell laptop in the press room to
> edit and upload and it serves me fine. I was considering a Apple laptop but
> 1) I don't want to shell out too much and 2) I don't know that I'm getting
> full benefit of the machine with a LCD which is not ideal for advanced
> Photoshop work such and color management. So I'm thinking of going with an
> eMac G4 with 256MB RAM and 40GB Hard Drive with CRT just to get me in the
> door for about $750.00 and keep the Dell laptop for on location. Any
> problems with the eMacs? Other suggestions?

The eMac is a fine computer. Getting only 256MB is a bit lite, but it
should do for starters.
Anonymous
December 8, 2004 2:18:30 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

On 12/7/04 1:12 PM, in article Tgntd.9965$_3.117280@typhoon.sonic.net, "you
know who maybe" <nguser2u@spamnotAOL.com> wrote:

> I'm a very long-time PC user and sometimes administrator for Windows servers
> and UNIX and also a semi-pro digital sports photographer with some Photoshop
> experience on a PC. I'm now considering buying my first Mac to use for
> photography but I also need to learn OSX and how to support it in a
> corporate environment.
>
> While doing photography on location I use a Dell laptop in the press room to
> edit and upload and it serves me fine. I was considering a Apple laptop but
> 1) I don't want to shell out too much and 2) I don't know that I'm getting
> full benefit of the machine with a LCD which is not ideal for advanced
> Photoshop work such and color management. So I'm thinking of going with an
> eMac G4 with 256MB RAM and 40GB Hard Drive with CRT just to get me in the
> door for about $750.00 and keep the Dell laptop for on location. Any
> problems with the eMacs? Other suggestions?
>
> Thanks!
>
>
I use both PC's and Mac's but I now use Mac's 90% of the time and almost
exclusively for digital photo processing. I initially shared your concern
regarding LCD's but have found that the LCD's on my Mac's perform just fine.
OS X is a very solid operating system; I would prefer the iMac to the eMac
with at least 512 Meg of ram.
Chuck
Anonymous
December 8, 2004 7:17:54 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

-----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE-----
Hash: SHA1

I agree, the only problem with it is the 256 megs of RAM. Otherwise,
the eMac (or any of the new product line) are fine machines indeed.

Shawn Hearn wrote:
| In article <Tgntd.9965$_3.117280@typhoon.sonic.net>,
| "you know who maybe" <nguser2u@spamnotAOL.com> wrote:
|
|
|>I'm a very long-time PC user and sometimes administrator for Windows
servers
|>and UNIX and also a semi-pro digital sports photographer with some
Photoshop
|>experience on a PC. I'm now considering buying my first Mac to use for
|>photography but I also need to learn OSX and how to support it in a
|>corporate environment.
|>
|>While doing photography on location I use a Dell laptop in the press
room to
|>edit and upload and it serves me fine. I was considering a Apple
laptop but
|>1) I don't want to shell out too much and 2) I don't know that I'm
getting
|>full benefit of the machine with a LCD which is not ideal for advanced
|>Photoshop work such and color management. So I'm thinking of going
with an
|>eMac G4 with 256MB RAM and 40GB Hard Drive with CRT just to get me in the
|>door for about $750.00 and keep the Dell laptop for on location. Any
|>problems with the eMacs? Other suggestions?
|
|
| The eMac is a fine computer. Getting only 256MB is a bit lite, but it
| should do for starters.

- --
Nathan DeGruchy

~ "I love deadlines. I like the whooshing
~ sound they make as they fly by."
-- Douglas Adams
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Anonymous
December 8, 2004 8:50:22 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

In article <Tgntd.9965$_3.117280@typhoon.sonic.net>, you know who maybe
<nguser2u@spamnotAOL.com> wrote:

> I'm a very long-time PC user and sometimes administrator for Windows servers
> and UNIX and also a semi-pro digital sports photographer with some Photoshop
> experience on a PC. I'm now considering buying my first Mac to use for
> photography but I also need to learn OSX and how to support it in a
> corporate environment.
>
> While doing photography on location I use a Dell laptop in the press room to
> edit and upload and it serves me fine. I was considering a Apple laptop but
> 1) I don't want to shell out too much and 2) I don't know that I'm getting
> full benefit of the machine with a LCD which is not ideal for advanced
> Photoshop work such and color management. So I'm thinking of going with an
> eMac G4 with 256MB RAM and 40GB Hard Drive with CRT just to get me in the
> door for about $750.00 and keep the Dell laptop for on location. Any
> problems with the eMacs? Other suggestions?

Once you go Mac, you'll never go back.
Anonymous
December 8, 2004 5:01:09 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

I would look at buying a G4 tower you can upgrade a lot more things than
with the Emac. Finding one even used should work out fine for you. Memory
is really going to be an issue but you can probably add more 3rd party for
less $ than buying from apple.

Even a used G4 should be just as fast as the Emac but give you much more
flexibility. You could even use the monitor for both your Dell laptop and
the Mac.


Wayne


"Shawn Hearn" <srhi@comcast.net> wrote in message
news:srhi-8F27F4.22495907122004@news-40.giganews.com...
> In article <Tgntd.9965$_3.117280@typhoon.sonic.net>,
> "you know who maybe" <nguser2u@spamnotAOL.com> wrote:
>
>> I'm a very long-time PC user and sometimes administrator for Windows
>> servers
>> and UNIX and also a semi-pro digital sports photographer with some
>> Photoshop
>> experience on a PC. I'm now considering buying my first Mac to use for
>> photography but I also need to learn OSX and how to support it in a
>> corporate environment.
>>
>> While doing photography on location I use a Dell laptop in the press room
>> to
>> edit and upload and it serves me fine. I was considering a Apple laptop
>> but
>> 1) I don't want to shell out too much and 2) I don't know that I'm
>> getting
>> full benefit of the machine with a LCD which is not ideal for advanced
>> Photoshop work such and color management. So I'm thinking of going with
>> an
>> eMac G4 with 256MB RAM and 40GB Hard Drive with CRT just to get me in the
>> door for about $750.00 and keep the Dell laptop for on location. Any
>> problems with the eMacs? Other suggestions?
>
> The eMac is a fine computer. Getting only 256MB is a bit lite, but it
> should do for starters.
Anonymous
December 9, 2004 3:31:34 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

In article <081220040550225713%rag@nospam.techline.com>,
rag@nospam.techline.com says...
>
>In article <Tgntd.9965$_3.117280@typhoon.sonic.net>, you know who maybe
><nguser2u@spamnotAOL.com> wrote:
>
>> I'm a very long-time PC user and sometimes administrator for Windows servers
>> and UNIX and also a semi-pro digital sports photographer with some Photoshop
>> experience on a PC. I'm now considering buying my first Mac to use for
>> photography but I also need to learn OSX and how to support it in a
>> corporate environment.
>>
>> While doing photography on location I use a Dell laptop in the press room to
>> edit and upload and it serves me fine. I was considering a Apple laptop but
>> 1) I don't want to shell out too much and 2) I don't know that I'm getting
>> full benefit of the machine with a LCD which is not ideal for advanced
>> Photoshop work such and color management. So I'm thinking of going with an
>> eMac G4 with 256MB RAM and 40GB Hard Drive with CRT just to get me in the
>> door for about $750.00 and keep the Dell laptop for on location. Any
>> problems with the eMacs? Other suggestions?
>
>Once you go Mac, you'll never go back.

God take mine. I have a G3 350 that I got with my new job. Now they want me to
do video and it won't play anything. Moving it up to OSX Panther helped
somewhat, but I detest OS9 and I have to use that with the Nikon scanner and
an HP burner. Now today it won't recognize a USB memory device I have used for
the 6 months I have been here. New graphics computers are not in the budget.

Tom
Anonymous
December 9, 2004 3:31:35 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

In article <cp86d602m3a@enews4.newsguy.com>, Tom Monego
<tom@nospam.microlightphoto.com> wrote:

> >Once you go Mac, you'll never go back.
>
> God take mine. I have a G3 350 that I got with my new job. Now they want me
> to
> do video and it won't play anything. Moving it up to OSX Panther helped
> somewhat, but I detest OS9 and I have to use that with the Nikon scanner and
> an HP burner. Now today it won't recognize a USB memory device I have used
> for the 6 months I have been here. New graphics computers are not in the budget.

that mac is five years old! the fact that there are some issues is not
too surprising. and they can easily be fixed too.

toast should see nearly any burner - much better than the built in
stuff. there are also several scanning applications such as silverfast
and vuescan that most likely support your scanner, and do a better job
at it too.

some usb devices operate out of spec and may not work if plugged into
the keyboard usb port or unpowered hub. i don't know if yours is one of
those, but you might try the usb ports on the back of the computer or
get a powered usb hub and see if that is more reliable.
Anonymous
December 9, 2004 9:17:01 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

nospam wrote:

> In article <cp86d602m3a@enews4.newsguy.com>, Tom Monego
> <tom@nospam.microlightphoto.com> wrote:
>
>
>>>Once you go Mac, you'll never go back.
>>
>>God take mine. I have a G3 350 that I got with my new job. Now they want me
>>to
>>do video and it won't play anything. Moving it up to OSX Panther helped
>>somewhat, but I detest OS9 and I have to use that with the Nikon scanner and
>>an HP burner. Now today it won't recognize a USB memory device I have used
>>for the 6 months I have been here. New graphics computers are not in the budget.
>
>
> that mac is five years old! the fact that there are some issues is not
> too surprising. and they can easily be fixed too.
>
> toast should see nearly any burner - much better than the built in
> stuff. there are also several scanning applications such as silverfast
> and vuescan that most likely support your scanner, and do a better job
> at it too.
>
> some usb devices operate out of spec and may not work if plugged into
> the keyboard usb port or unpowered hub. i don't know if yours is one of
> those, but you might try the usb ports on the back of the computer or
> get a powered usb hub and see if that is more reliable.

The G-3 should be able to play video all right if it's not got just the
default config of RAM, what 64 Megs? But for it to "do" video, rots of
ruck. You might as well enter a stock 98 Toyota in the Baja race.

--
John McWilliams
Anonymous
December 9, 2004 7:37:41 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Tom Monego wrote:
> In article <081220040550225713%rag@nospam.techline.com>,
> rag@nospam.techline.com says...
>
>>In article <Tgntd.9965$_3.117280@typhoon.sonic.net>, you know who maybe
>><nguser2u@spamnotAOL.com> wrote:
>>
>>
>>>I'm a very long-time PC user and sometimes administrator for Windows servers
>>>and UNIX and also a semi-pro digital sports photographer with some Photoshop
>>>experience on a PC. I'm now considering buying my first Mac to use for
>>>photography but I also need to learn OSX and how to support it in a
>>>corporate environment.
>>>
>>>While doing photography on location I use a Dell laptop in the press room to
>>>edit and upload and it serves me fine. I was considering a Apple laptop but
>>>1) I don't want to shell out too much and 2) I don't know that I'm getting
>>>full benefit of the machine with a LCD which is not ideal for advanced
>>>Photoshop work such and color management. So I'm thinking of going with an
>>>eMac G4 with 256MB RAM and 40GB Hard Drive with CRT just to get me in the
>>>door for about $750.00 and keep the Dell laptop for on location. Any
>>>problems with the eMacs? Other suggestions?
>>
>>Once you go Mac, you'll never go back.
>
>
> God take mine. I have a G3 350 that I got with my new job. Now they want me to
> do video and it won't play anything. Moving it up to OSX Panther helped
> somewhat, but I detest OS9 and I have to use that with the Nikon scanner and
> an HP burner. Now today it won't recognize a USB memory device I have used for
> the 6 months I have been here. New graphics computers are not in the budget.
>
> Tom
>
Was that similar in spec to Windows 95 (no USB - tuff networking - etc)?

Now if you offered a G5 dual - there's a thing or 2 or more...

Aerticeus
!