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Planning to build a SSD Raid 0 array into my laptop

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June 6, 2012 8:55:54 AM

Hello,
I own a msi GT780DXR-46US (Sandy Bridge) which came with 2x 750gb sata 2 in raid 0. But I don't like that 5.9 WEI. So my idea is buy a twin encore, put there those HDDs for data and buy 2x SSD Sata 3 and make a raid 0 array. Now it comes my doubts where I need your help and opinions.
1.- Is this possible?
2.- External HDDs kill the performance of my SSD array?
3.- Is it true a SSD Raid 0 array doesn't deserve the worth?
4.- Need I first change in the BIOS AHCI mode by RAID mode, build the raid 0 array and then install my Windows 7 Home Premium 64bits?
I would appreciate your help and opinions, and thanks a lot in advance by your attention.





















a b G Storage
June 6, 2012 9:13:18 AM

you're an idiot. Wei? really? and SSD raid on a laptop? sigh
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a b G Storage
June 6, 2012 9:29:05 AM

First, I would ask why you feel you need to set up a RAID array? The only real practical reason for this would be if you're working with uncompressed video data formats and your doing a lot of work requiring extreme write speeds. There is very little benefit otherwise over using an SSD in AHCI mode.

1- Entirely possible.
2- External HDDs won't kill the performance, they'll just operate as slowly as any would over a eSATA or USB connection.
3- It's true. SSDs are fast enough.
4- Your disk mode is already set to RAID in the BIOS, you'd just need to use the disk controllers RAID utility to build the array with the new disks. You would also have to have the RAID controller's install files when running the Windows 7 install.

You won't see better performance running games other than somewhat shorter load times between screens.

If you want to just speed up your load time a little, you'd be better off using an SSD for your OS (80GB+) and one for your apps (depending on how many apps you have 256GB+ is what I'd recommend). Just the SSD for your OS drive will get your WEI score somewhere in the 7s on SATA 2 3GB/S. Then store your media files off to an external drive as necessary. You'll be able to leave the contoller in RAID mode as it will run single disks not part of an array as AHCI when set to RAID mode. This is what I'd recommend if you're looking for a bit of a boost in disk speed.
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June 6, 2012 12:18:14 PM

In my laptop I run a 256Gb SSD (Samsung 810) for the OS and games. Then I put all my other apps (media, office programs, multimedia applications, etc) on a 750GB WD Black. Both are exceptionally fast for their purposes and I did not lose TRIM support on my SSD! And it was very cost effective.

Do not RAID 0 your SSDs.
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June 14, 2012 7:53:43 PM

unksol said:
you're an idiot. Wei? really? and SSD raid on a laptop? sigh

Did you read well my post? I wrote:
Is it truth to make a SSD RAID 0 doesn't deserve the worth? But you qualify me as an idiot. Do you know who I am? But you are a VETERAN. Suppose any beginner guy registers in this forum and he make a trivial question. Why you, VETERAN, has the right to insult him? So your reply reflects ignorance. It is clear for me that your parents don't learned you what is the good principles in a society. Question of genes maybe. Do you want enter in polemic with me? Not problem.
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June 14, 2012 9:01:20 PM

ubercake said:
First, I would ask why you feel you need to set up a RAID array? The only real practical reason for this would be if you're working with uncompressed video data formats and your doing a lot of work requiring extreme write speeds. There is very little benefit otherwise over using an SSD in AHCI mode.

1- Entirely possible.
2- External HDDs won't kill the performance, they'll just operate as slowly as any would over a eSATA or USB connection.
3- It's true. SSDs are fast enough.
4- Your disk mode is already set to RAID in the BIOS, you'd just need to use the disk controllers RAID utility to build the array with the new disks. You would also have to have the RAID controller's install files when running the Windows 7 install.

You won't see better performance running games other than somewhat shorter load times between screens.

If you want to just speed up your load time a little, you'd be better off using an SSD for your OS (80GB+) and one for your apps (depending on how many apps you have 256GB+ is what I'd recommend). Just the SSD for your OS drive will get your WEI score somewhere in the 7s on SATA 2 3GB/S. Then store your media files off to an external drive as necessary. You'll be able to leave the contoller in RAID mode as it will run single disks not part of an array as AHCI when set to RAID mode. This is what I'd recommend if you're looking for a bit of a boost in disk speed.


Thanks a lot ubercake, that was an educated reply (compare with the VETERAN reply). You know, my laptop came with 2 HDDs in RAID 0mode. Please let me tell you some details of my notebook.
Intel i7-2670 QM, 6MB L3 cache, up to 3.1 GHz turbo boost.
GTX 570M, 3GB GDDR5
16GB 1600 DDR3 RAM
Blu-Ray Burner
I knew about a SSD RAID 0 array is not big deal, but that one slow my laptop neither. Now I did this question in Tom's Hardware because I know this is a prestigious site (you know VETERAN). Just to confirm. I need speed? Yes, because I'm addict video game player. You know, I also own my old rig (2006) Which I built myself and after I did an upgrade ($500, maybe didn't deserve the worth, but not problem). Well I have raptors in RAID 0 but I also put them standalone and I found an additional performance of about 25% in RAID 0 array.
Anyway, thanks a lot for helping!
Sincerely,
Pedro A. Fernandez
Caracas-Venezuela


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June 15, 2012 1:55:52 AM

po1nted said:
In my laptop I run a 256Gb SSD (Samsung 810) for the OS and games. Then I put all my other apps (media, office programs, multimedia applications, etc) on a 750GB WD Black. Both are exceptionally fast for their purposes and I did not lose TRIM support on my SSD! And it was very cost effective.

Do not RAID 0 your SSDs.


Thanks by your recommendation po1nted, I appreciate it. So I don't need to buy a couple SSDs. Simply I'm going to buy an external encore in order to put there my two WD 750GB and connect it in my external SATA or in one out of my 3 USB 3.0. You know, I have made some research about the best SSD and your Samsung is one out of the best even though the new series is 830 with a Samsung controller. Since I have read SandForce controller seems to be the best one, I'm thinking to buy an Intel 520 Cherryville 240GB SATA 3 ($330). I also read Corsair is manufacturing good SSDs. Anyway, thanks a lot for helping me.
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Best solution

a b G Storage
June 15, 2012 10:49:48 AM

Intels are the most reliable out there. 520s have great speed. I haven't had a problem with mine at all. Crucial also makes great reliable drives.
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June 15, 2012 11:21:07 PM

Best answer selected by pikunsia.
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June 15, 2012 11:22:34 PM

Al right uber.
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November 3, 2012 11:17:01 PM

I think that was a great question: for the record.
The major limiting factor of a fast computer is the hard drive. This is without debate.
In my Lenovo W520 (I7 2620 @ 2.7 GHz) I am running the Intel 520 SSD. Aside from the massive speed boost I also see a longer battery life per charge as there are no moving parts. The second drive is a platter based standard WD 7200 RPM with 500 GB capacity used when I need to take a number of large files with. Located where the DVD drive used to be and an adapter must be used to mount the drive. The drive only spins up when accessed and spins down soon after to minimize power consumption. I specifically decided not to put another SSD here as there is no trim support on the controller when running as Raid 0 (stripped). Series 7 Intel motherboards now have Raid 0 trim support which effectively doubles the stats relating to R/W.
Would I need this? That's a semantics argument in line with; do I need an Intel core I5 or I7? The answer is that you would purchase what is within your price range and provides the best bang for the buck.
Soon we will see mSATA SSD's with Raid 0 and trim support. Put four of these in the laptop, using single cell SSD's and you may effectively replace RAM as we know it. It would then not be uncommon to see computers running with a dynamic allocation of RAM from 4GB to 400+ GB depending on your SSD combined array size and the immediate requirements of your use.

My point: If you think outside the box of current motherboard architecture and apply today's innovation against tomorrow's direction it is very plausible to see laptops (within 5 years) have a terabyte (1000 GB) of SSD across 4 SSD's in RAID 0 with Trim with the ability to allocate 4 through 900 GB of RAM directly against the same array without any compromise in speed vs. traditional RAM.
MS already has ReadyBoost which effectively turns a USB memory stick into usable RAM and over a USB 3.0 connection it's respectable.
From that perspective my laptop has 4 to 132 GB of RAM available right now as I write. Do I need it no, will I 'tomorrow'? Well 4 MB of RAM used to be enough now 1 GB is barely enough which is 256 times as much RAM. Solid state drive's in RAID-0 will become a staple on all new laptop/ slate devices in the future; I was to bet on anything.
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March 20, 2013 11:06:38 PM

Hi man, do not hear the people who don't know the RAID 0 advantages. I have Sony Vaio Z which comes with 2 SSDs in RAID 0. It is very fast, I'm working a lot on my PC with two o three virtuals at the same time, and never had a problem with SSD. It very fast comparing to all notebooks of my friends. So, if you have a possibility to configure 2xSSD RAID 0 you will win!
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a b G Storage
March 21, 2013 2:45:32 AM

Kostanos said:
Hi man, do not hear the people who don't know the RAID 0 advantages. I have Sony Vaio Z which comes with 2 SSDs in RAID 0. It is very fast, I'm working a lot on my PC with two o three virtuals at the same time, and never had a problem with SSD. It very fast comparing to all notebooks of my friends. So, if you have a possibility to configure 2xSSD RAID 0 you will win!

Dude... This thread is prehistoric.
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March 27, 2013 2:31:29 PM

Kostanos said:
Hi man, do not hear the people who don't know the RAID 0 advantages. I have Sony Vaio Z which comes with 2 SSDs in RAID 0. It is very fast, I'm working a lot on my PC with two o three virtuals at the same time, and never had a problem with SSD. It very fast comparing to all notebooks of my friends. So, if you have a possibility to configure 2xSSD RAID 0 you will win!
Thanks for helping Kostanos. What happens is that exists opposite opinions at respect. In general I have read that expert people claiming that SSDs in RAID0 don't deserve the worth and another people like you prefer such an arrangement. But please you don't underestimate ubercake's competency, indeed his recommendations have been really fine in my case. I bought a Samsung 830 256GB, change my 4x4GB DDR3 RAM for 2x8GB G.Skill and now my WEI has passed from 5.4 to 7.5! I also enter in my desktop when power on in just 20 seconds! I own the new AIDA 64 Extreme and running the benchmarks just defeat my laptop the i-7 3960x, 3770k, Opteron 12 cores and also but not in all the BM i7-2600k, i.e. pure desktops & servers and I own a laptop! Okay it is very powerful ($1,900) but anyway, so I'm very content.

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March 27, 2013 2:37:32 PM

markmuehlbauer said:
I think that was a great question: for the record.
The major limiting factor of a fast computer is the hard drive. This is without debate.
In my Lenovo W520 (I7 2620 @ 2.7 GHz) I am running the Intel 520 SSD. Aside from the massive speed boost I also see a longer battery life per charge as there are no moving parts. The second drive is a platter based standard WD 7200 RPM with 500 GB capacity used when I need to take a number of large files with. Located where the DVD drive used to be and an adapter must be used to mount the drive. The drive only spins up when accessed and spins down soon after to minimize power consumption. I specifically decided not to put another SSD here as there is no trim support on the controller when running as Raid 0 (stripped). Series 7 Intel motherboards now have Raid 0 trim support which effectively doubles the stats relating to R/W.
Would I need this? That's a semantics argument in line with; do I need an Intel core I5 or I7? The answer is that you would purchase what is within your price range and provides the best bang for the buck.
Soon we will see mSATA SSD's with Raid 0 and trim support. Put four of these in the laptop, using single cell SSD's and you may effectively replace RAM as we know it. It would then not be uncommon to see computers running with a dynamic allocation of RAM from 4GB to 400+ GB depending on your SSD combined array size and the immediate requirements of your use.

My point: If you think outside the box of current motherboard architecture and apply today's innovation against tomorrow's direction it is very plausible to see laptops (within 5 years) have a terabyte (1000 GB) of SSD across 4 SSD's in RAID 0 with Trim with the ability to allocate 4 through 900 GB of RAM directly against the same array without any compromise in speed vs. traditional RAM.
MS already has ReadyBoost which effectively turns a USB memory stick into usable RAM and over a USB 3.0 connection it's respectable.
From that perspective my laptop has 4 to 132 GB of RAM available right now as I write. Do I need it no, will I 'tomorrow'? Well 4 MB of RAM used to be enough now 1 GB is barely enough which is 256 times as much RAM. Solid state drive's in RAID-0 will become a staple on all new laptop/ slate devices in the future; I was to bet on anything.

What a good explanation, thanks a lot markmuehlbauer.


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