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Firmware version 1.1.0 for Canon 20D

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  • Firmware
  • Canon
  • Cameras
Last response: in Digital Camera
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Anonymous
December 7, 2004 6:27:10 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Has anyone tried the 1.1.0 firmware in the Canon 20D? I am currently
running 1.0.5 and it works fine but am curious about moving to 1.1.0 and
if there is any feedback out there yet.

Here's the email I received from Canon......

"As a part of our ongoing commitment to maintaining the highest
standards of product performance and customer support, we are taking
this opportunity to inform you of a new firmware update for the 20D.

This firmware update fixes/improves the following:

1. Three new languages (Russian, Korean, and Traditional Chinese)
have been added to the camera menus.
2. The phenomenon of horizontal line noise appearing in images taken
at high ISO settings while using the internal flash has been fixed.

This firmware update applies to cameras with firmware versions up to
1.0.5 installed. If your camera's firmware is already version 1.1.0, it
is not necessary to perform this update."

More about : firmware version canon 20d

Anonymous
December 8, 2004 12:42:11 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

"SmartAzz" <avoid_spam@ficticious_mail.com> wrote in message
news:p eptd.1497$c45.7350@news1.mts.net...
> Has anyone tried the 1.1.0 firmware in the Canon 20D? I am currently
> running 1.0.5 and it works fine but am curious about moving to 1.1.0 and
> if there is any feedback out there yet.
>
> Here's the email I received from Canon......
>
> "As a part of our ongoing commitment to maintaining the highest standards
> of product performance and customer support, we are taking this
> opportunity to inform you of a new firmware update for the 20D.
>
> This firmware update fixes/improves the following:
>
> 1. Three new languages (Russian, Korean, and Traditional Chinese) have
> been added to the camera menus.
> 2. The phenomenon of horizontal line noise appearing in images taken at
> high ISO settings while using the internal flash has been fixed.
>
> This firmware update applies to cameras with firmware versions up to 1.0.5
> installed. If your camera's firmware is already version 1.1.0, it is not
> necessary to perform this update."

Hmmm. I don't own that camera but from what I remember reading here and
there the banding problem (item #2) was not just with the internal flash.
Anonymous
December 8, 2004 3:39:47 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

SmartAzz <avoid_spam@ficticious_mail.com> wrote:

> 2. The phenomenon of horizontal line noise appearing in images taken
> at high ISO settings while using the internal flash has been fixed.

This "fix" seems to be done by clipping the dynamic range quite a bit
and it is in effect whether or not the internal flash was used. I'm
looking this from the ICC profiling data, comparing the results from
v.1.0.5 and v.1.1.0.

It seems very likely that it is a hardware problem so a software "fix"
can not correct it, it can only hide it. Most probably the high
current pulse that is generated when the internal flash is ignited is
induced to the signal and/or power supply wirings in the sensor, e.g.
by electromagnetic field or by a bounce on the ground wiring.

Timo Autiokari
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Anonymous
December 9, 2004 6:00:15 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

In other word design flaw that instead of fixing they are covering over with
a half-assed fixed. Sounds about right for Canon.

John


"Timo Autiokari" <timo.autiokari@aim-dtp.net> wrote in message
news:3hbcr05j7umk7mesjeg4hep4bvkkl4bg2g@4ax.com...
> SmartAzz <avoid_spam@ficticious_mail.com> wrote:
>
>> 2. The phenomenon of horizontal line noise appearing in images taken
>> at high ISO settings while using the internal flash has been fixed.
>
> This "fix" seems to be done by clipping the dynamic range quite a bit
> and it is in effect whether or not the internal flash was used. I'm
> looking this from the ICC profiling data, comparing the results from
> v.1.0.5 and v.1.1.0.
>
> It seems very likely that it is a hardware problem so a software "fix"
> can not correct it, it can only hide it. Most probably the high
> current pulse that is generated when the internal flash is ignited is
> induced to the signal and/or power supply wirings in the sensor, e.g.
> by electromagnetic field or by a bounce on the ground wiring.
>
> Timo Autiokari
Anonymous
December 9, 2004 7:42:02 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

>>
>>> 2. The phenomenon of horizontal line noise appearing in images taken
>>> at high ISO settings while using the internal flash has been fixed.
>>
>> This "fix" seems to be done by clipping the dynamic range quite a bit
>> and it is in effect whether or not the internal flash was used. I'm
>> looking this from the ICC profiling data, comparing the results from
>> v.1.0.5 and v.1.1.0.
>>
>> It seems very likely that it is a hardware problem so a software "fix"
>> can not correct it, it can only hide it. Most probably the high
>> current pulse that is generated when the internal flash is ignited is
>> induced to the signal and/or power supply wirings in the sensor, e.g.
>> by electromagnetic field or by a bounce on the ground wiring.
>>
>> Timo Autiokari
>
>
I have updated my 20D from 1.0.5 to 1.1.0 and, so far, have not noticed any
degradation in photos taken using the new firmware. Would not the clipping
in the dynamic range show up in the histograms? Again, so far, I don't see
reductions in the dynamic range according to the histograms or visual
inspection. I will admit that I am looking at real world results, I am not
taking pictures of test charts that might better reveal any flaw.
Chuck
Anonymous
December 9, 2004 11:36:40 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

"Wright" <nojunk_wright9@nojunk_mac.com> wrote in message
news:BDDD33A2.FEE1%nojunk_wright9@nojunk_mac.com...
>
> >
> I have updated my 20D from 1.0.5 to 1.1.0 and, so far, have not noticed
any
> degradation in photos taken using the new firmware. Would not the
clipping
> in the dynamic range show up in the histograms? Again, so far, I don't
see
> reductions in the dynamic range according to the histograms or visual
> inspection. I will admit that I am looking at real world results, I am
not
> taking pictures of test charts that might better reveal any flaw.
> Chuck
>
Ahhh Chuck. How can you do that?
Don't you know the 10 day routine yet?

1. Sell your perfectly good 10D and buy a new 20D that locks up when you
change the lens.
2. Flash the firmware as soon as Canon put it up on their web site and kill
the camera.
3. After Canon service restore it (or wait a few days for it to restore
itself) Flash it again with the patched firmware.
4. Shoot a couple of hundred 'test shots' of resolution charts and DOF
charts.
5. Send the camera back to Canon for adjustment of the faults you found.
6. Actually take your first "real world" photograph and then use Photoshop
to make it look the way it should.
7. Post it on Pbase for all to see and pass comments.
8. Take the camera back to Canon when someone points out "purple fringing"
on some tree branches.
9. When you get it back, shoot a few hundred tree branches using the plastic
lens that came with the camera.
10. Send it back to Canon to have the lens calibrated for back focus
problems it doesn't have.
It is totally optional to repeat any or all of these steps as you see fit.

Now from what you said in your post... you seem to be stuck on day six. Sort
of Ground Hog day stuff. Get a grip on yourself Chuck. Shape up and join the
crew or get rid of the camera and buy another brand. If you are going to be
a 20D user, do it right man.

Doug
Anonymous
December 9, 2004 11:36:41 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

> Ahhh Chuck. How can you do that?
> Don't you know the 10 day routine yet?
>
> 1. Sell your perfectly good 10D and buy a new 20D that locks up when you
> change the lens.
> 2. Flash the firmware as soon as Canon put it up on their web site and kill
> the camera.
> 3. After Canon service restore it (or wait a few days for it to restore
> itself) Flash it again with the patched firmware.
> 4. Shoot a couple of hundred 'test shots' of resolution charts and DOF
> charts.
> 5. Send the camera back to Canon for adjustment of the faults you found.
> 6. Actually take your first "real world" photograph and then use Photoshop
> to make it look the way it should.
> 7. Post it on Pbase for all to see and pass comments.
> 8. Take the camera back to Canon when someone points out "purple fringing"
> on some tree branches.
> 9. When you get it back, shoot a few hundred tree branches using the plastic
> lens that came with the camera.
> 10. Send it back to Canon to have the lens calibrated for back focus
> problems it doesn't have.
> It is totally optional to repeat any or all of these steps as you see fit.
>
> Now from what you said in your post... you seem to be stuck on day six. Sort
> of Ground Hog day stuff. Get a grip on yourself Chuck. Shape up and join the
> crew or get rid of the camera and buy another brand. If you are going to be
> a 20D user, do it right man.
>
> Doug
>
>
Ah, I now see the light! I think that I will just get rid of this 20D and
move up to a 1Ds Mark II - if you will just advance me a down payment. :) 
Chuck
Anonymous
December 12, 2004 5:06:51 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Wright wrote:
> I have updated my 20D from 1.0.5 to 1.1.0 and, so far, have not
noticed any
> degradation in photos taken using the new firmware. Would not the
clipping
> in the dynamic range show up in the histograms?

It can not be seen from the Histogram of normal photos. Dynamic range
(or the lack of it) most often comes visible when images are edited,
large dynamic range makes it posible to "open up the shadows" either by
using the Curves tool or density masking techniques, in case the
dynamic range is not good then those operations reveal no image
information and/or just the sensor noise becomes more visible.

The maximum exposure time (that still gives good quality images) is
also related with dynamic range. The smaller the dynamic range is the
higher is the image noise or clipping of image information in the dark
end becomes visible.

Timo Autiokari
!