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P8P67 Pro or P8P67 Deluxe?

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January 9, 2011 7:15:45 PM

I don't see much difference in the P8P67 Pro and P8P67 Deluxe. I will only have one GPU, I need a PCI slot to run an old SCSI card / scanner. Do some gaming, some video editing, but vast majority of my work is Photoshop and Lightroom. Will either be using i5 2500k or i7 2600k, probably i5 2500k as the i7 doesn't look to be much better.

I'm leaning towards the Pro version of the board. Any reason I should consider Deluxe?

More about : p8p67 pro p8p67 deluxe

January 9, 2011 8:00:04 PM

The Deluxe adds a few more BIOS features and another heat sink, as well as a box to the case front for 2 USB 3.0 ports. Of course with a HAF X case, you already get that. So if you don't have a case that has USB 3.0 in front, that could be a worthy consideration.

If you think you might want to OC in the future, it has the edge. But not by much. I payed the extra for it thinking that when I do get into OCing I didn't want to be missing any features for this. Plus the used value on it will be a touch higher, when the day comes. I think the Deluxe also adds a second LAN controller. But other than that, pretty much the same boards.
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a c 209 V Motherboard
January 9, 2011 9:23:52 PM

Compare them all here:

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Productcompare.aspx?Submi...|13-131-682^13-131-682-TS%2C13-131-681^13-131-681-TS%2C13-131-686^13-131-686-TS%2C13-131-685^13-131-685-TS%2C13-131-679^13-131-679-TS

According to Newegg ... the deluxe adds AI Suite II, MemOK!, DTS, Q-Design, 16+2 Digital Power Delivery design ...

.... but I long ago found ya can't trust newegg's descriptions as being complete. The biggest things I have found is the BIOS features ...only the "enhusiast" boards from Asus include the OC profiles features which let you choose one of 10 different BIOS profiles to load at boot.

The standard P8P67 BTW, has two PCI Express 2.0 x16 slots.... only the $105 ASUS P8H67-M LE hs one.
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a c 1099 V Motherboard
January 9, 2011 9:32:42 PM

JackNaylorPE said:
The standard P8P67 BTW, has two PCI Express 2.0 x16 slots.

One of which runs at X4
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January 9, 2011 10:33:54 PM

JackNaylorPE said:


I long ago found ya can't trust newegg's descriptions as being complete. The biggest things I have found is the BIOS features ...only the "enhusiast" boards from Asus include the OC profiles features which let you choose one of 10 different BIOS profiles to load at boot.




The P8P67 series boards are not their "enthusiasts" boards.

That would be the Maximus series.


AFAIK, all of the P8p67 boards share the same BIOS/OC features. The biggest difference btwn the "deluxe" and the rest is the 16 phase power.

All of the rest of the differences are just bells and whistles between the 67, 67PRO, 67EVO, 67Deluxe.

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a c 716 V Motherboard
January 9, 2011 10:45:04 PM

Then why not just the standard P8P67? If you are a Professional then won't a Xeon or i7 6-core be a better choice? Unless this us a hobby thing...
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a c 235 V Motherboard
January 9, 2011 11:23:20 PM

^+1...

A LGA 1366 is the better path for a professional setup. The LGA 1155 was not designed to replace the X58 for highend. The X58 is still Intel's highend chipset, till the release of the X68 later this year.
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January 9, 2011 11:30:45 PM

jaquith said:
Then why not just the standard P8P67? If you are a Professional then won't a .... i7 6-core be a better choice?


The i7-2600k blows away ALL of the other i7's at a very reasonable price.

The i5 2500k blows away 99% of the i7's at an incredible price.

As far as motherboards, I'm leaning towards the the base P8p67because like the OP I I don't game, have no need for dual GPU cards, dual LAN ports, extra USB 3.0 front case adapter, and only "hope" for a 24/7 stable 4.0 Ghz OC to run Photoshop mainly and some occasional use of Sony Vegas for video editing..

There are many "professionals" that make their living using rock bottom components.

For that matter, most professionals would choose an Intel board for their stability at stock settings and not worry about anything beyond that.

Your point ?
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January 10, 2011 1:15:26 AM

tecmo34 said:
^+1...

A LGA 1366 is the better path for a professional setup.



I don't understand why people are making these assumptions. Look at the data vs how a product is advertised. It's clear SB is marketed as a "mainstream" processor but why allow marketing to skew public impression of SB. The facts are it's a solid performer across the board, professional or not. Why would an $800 processor be better than a $300 processor when the performance is essentially the same or better...?
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a c 235 V Motherboard
January 10, 2011 1:29:10 AM

Data vs Advertised has nothing to do with it.

It is platform based that is making it known as Mainstream. If SB was designed to be "highend", why limit it to x8,x8 versus x16,x16 of the x58 (not including MOBO makers adding the NF200 to give it that support)? Why not release hex cores on the platform? Why did Intel say replacement for LGA 1156?

I will not argue it is one hell of a CPU and is one of the best buys for power to performance. I'm debating picking up an i7 2500k build for myself to go along with my X58 build. We've seen the benchmarks :)  What we are saying (well I'm saying) is, if you are a professional (doing it for your sole income), the X58 hex-cores or Xeon workstations are your best option. Yes, you are paying high dollar for the setup, but you will be better served by going with the X58.
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January 10, 2011 1:33:36 AM

tecmo34 said:
Data vs Advertised has nothing to do with it.

It is platform based that is making it known as Mainstream. If SB was designed to be "highend", why limit it to x8,x8 versus x16,x16 of the x58 (not including MOBO makers adding the NF200 to give it that support)? Why not release hex cores on the platform? Why did Intel say replacement for LGA 1156?

I will not argue it is one hell of a CPU and is one of the best buys for power to performance. I'm debating picking up an i7 2500k build for myself to go along with my X58 build. We've seen the benchmarks :)  What we are saying (well I'm saying) is, if you are a professional (doing it for your sole income), the X58 hex-cores or Xeon workstations are your best option. Yes, you are paying high dollar for the setup, but you will be better served by going with the X58.


Perhaps, and I see your point indeed. I don't think the 8x8 vs 16x16 will make much difference in photo/video production, gaming yes (maybe). But it will take a heck of a lot longer for a pro to recoup on a Xeon build. :D  Haha
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a c 716 V Motherboard
January 10, 2011 1:37:32 AM

swimswithtrout said:
There are many "professionals" that make their living using rock bottom components.

For that matter, most professionals would choose an Intel board for their stability at stock settings and not worry about anything beyond that.

Your point ?


...Professional then won't a [b said:
Xeon or i7 6-core be a better choice?]...Professional then won't a Xeon or i7 6-core be a better choice?
[/b]
Interesting omission {Xeon} as my first on the list & your subsequent edit, I don't look at 20sec~2 minute tests when most heavy lifting is considerably longer to process. Comparing a "Professional" wedding Photographer cropping photos and applying rudimentary filters in minutes to a Professional Graphic Artist processing HUGE separations with a huge number of layers that can take 'hours'. Next, you're dealing with non-ECC producing errors and which are unacceptable for most companies.

I have no issues the the SB consumer CPU, and I see everything from overkill to OMG you need a new PC. I see people trying to make Servers from i7's?!

So it depends on: Quality, Time, Need and Budget.

In CS5 this is my guy's 'guide' if you will -> http://ppbm5.com/Benchmark5.html
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a c 235 V Motherboard
January 10, 2011 1:39:55 AM

Yes, it'll take a good bit of busy to cover the cost :)  ... Maybe it can go as a Business tax rightoff :D  . I'm waiting for the X68 release to drop the i7 970 or i7 980x prices down to under $500 and I'll probably jump on one for an upgrade to my i7 920 DO.
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a c 716 V Motherboard
January 10, 2011 1:49:41 AM

As 'some' know I've been around for a L-O-N-G time, and today you've got the SB, tomorrow afternoon you've got the AMD Bulldozer, and next week the X68.

The Intel SB is the new-low-end to the Intel X68. A new 1000-core is already developed and is 10X+ faster than anything on the planet and is today being tested for desktop use. Therefore, enjoy the afternoon! ;) 
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January 10, 2011 2:14:02 AM

jaquith said:
As 'some' know I've been around for a L-O-N-G time, and today you've got the SB, tomorrow afternoon you've got the AMD Bulldozer, and next week the X68.

The Intel SB is the new-low-end to the Intel X68. A new 1000-core is already developed and is 10X+ faster than anything on the planet and is today being tested for desktop use. Therefore, enjoy the afternoon! ;) 



That's fantastic but if my math is correct, currently SB = $75/core so that would make for a $75,000 cpu. Just freakin' great. :lol:  Too bad Rapport couldn't get it together, Intel prices would be rock bottom if they had. :p 

http://www.technologyreview.com/Infotech/17076/?a=f
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a c 716 V Motherboard
January 10, 2011 2:26:07 AM

Wrong CPU, that was used for video processing.

I'm taking about the Virtex, I was wrong it's 20X+ faster; my oops -> http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-1342100/...

A CPU is ALL about Lithography -- the production cost isn't much more from the CPU in your printer to the CPU's that people are willing to pay $1000. The 'cost' is the R&D the production facility. CPUs are 90% a printing house, 10% growing the silicone.
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January 10, 2011 2:41:11 AM

Right, but they are marketing this as "new" tech. Seems like it's been in r&d for years now. It's now the matter of who put it out first and who is going to buy it. But in the end it's all just the tech game.... faster processors = more robust programs = more cost to the end user. Besides Adobe will find a way to bottleneck the best of them. Haha
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January 10, 2011 3:15:40 AM

Indeed, but the Sempron would be perfect if I wanted to stare at my desktop all day. :lol:  My point is the CPU game is driven by lazy arse programmers who continue to put out sluggish, choked full of pork programs that require "super computer-like" technology to keep up. If the focus was on programming slimmer more efficient programs, it would in the end drive processor cost down since there wouldn't be a need. This however, gaming aside. I suppose half the fun is trying to be top dog on Futuremark. But from a productivity vs cost perspective, programmers need to get on board.
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January 10, 2011 3:17:34 AM

tecmo34 said:
I'm waiting for the X68 release to drop the i7 970 or i7 980x prices down to under $500 and I'll probably jump on one for an upgrade to my i7 920 DO.


But on the other hand you could get out from under the 920/x58 system and still get decent money for it used- and make a move into SB/P67 that hangs with 980X for $ 320.00 instead of $1,000.00. That's where the real value is for now. Everyday you get closer to X68, the less X58 is worth. So why wait is the question, when price vs performance this good is staring you in the face with i7 2600K/P67?

In a year for $330 we'll probably be seeing 1155 CPU's stock at 4.4 GHz turbo boosted to 4.8. And OC'd into the 6's on air.
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January 10, 2011 6:14:39 AM

tecmo34 said:
Data vs Advertised has nothing to do with it.

It is platform based that is making it known as Mainstream. If SB was designed to be "highend", why limit it to x8,x8 versus x16,x16 of the x58 (not including MOBO makers adding the NF200 to give it that support)? Why not release hex cores on the platform? Why did Intel say replacement for LGA 1156?

I will not argue it is one hell of a CPU and is one of the best buys for power to performance. I'm debating picking up an i7 2500k build for myself to go along with my X58 build. We've seen the benchmarks :)  What we are saying (well I'm saying) is, if you are a professional (doing it for your sole income), the X58 hex-cores or Xeon workstations are your best option. Yes, you are paying high dollar for the setup, but you will be better served by going with the X58.


Well, I am a professional photographer. But, I'm not always working, and I'll use the machine for some gaming, video editing, after hours. Was going to go x58, but i5 2500k looks like more better performance for less money, and I'll always go that route. Wasn't that excited about the Asus x58 boards, sabertooth was probably the direction I would have taken with an i7 950, but again, looks like more bang for the buck with the i5 2500k.

I've watched A LOT of photographer go under paying for high dollar setups in every phase of the business. I mean going back to spending $50,000 on film scanners that were obsolete within 2 years and guys were making payments on stuff that wasn't bringing in any income. Seen the same thing with cameras, printers, and to a lesser extent work stations, but virtually every phase of the business.

My current build is a q6600 on an Asus p5wdh deluxe. Some folks didn't like that board. I've loved it. It's done great for around 4 years, and I'll still keep it around the house like an old faithful dog.
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a c 716 V Motherboard
January 10, 2011 12:20:53 PM

Based upon above, if I placed you in front of 5 rigs with the same SSD + RAM, AMD3 / X58 / P55 / P67 / Xeon and asked you to guess which is what 9.9999/10 you'd guess wrong and could not tell the difference; the correct guessing would be by chance alone. However, if I placed someone with an obscenely large multi layer preproduction image then they could pick-out between the X58 and Xeon.

In a literal snap of a finger -- imagine SB 2600K 'now' 4-core/8-threads @ 3.3GHz ; moving to =few months=> X68 8-cores/16-threads running @3.5~3.7GHz effectively doubling the processing power. Same can be achieved to day with Xeon.

Clearly, after 4 years yes it's about time replace. I see silly comments all of the time even in your post, I make them myself for perspective - like now. Your photography won't see an OMG improvement, but clearly your gaming will. In my office if someone loaded gaming 'stuff' on a production machine at the very least, short of firing them which I might, they'd staying after hours reformatting an reinstalling their WS. The WS are connected servers costing more that most peoples houses and my income & reputation is on the line.

In a Pros World it's about the REAL COSTS; I don't give a hoot about $500 when over a few months or or less I'll recapture it. I am to data what many graphics artists are to rendering farms. An hour to me is loosing a production day and risking my clients.

Typical Real Cost analyses:
$3,000 WS vs $5,000 WS 5 year with 5 day work week; my servers are 7/24/365.25
$3,000 WS = 3000/(5 * 12 * 20) = $2.5/day
$5,000 WS = 5000/(5 * 12 * 20) = $4.2/day
Lets say I ONLY save 15 minutes / day ; $40 /4 = $10 ; (4.2 - 2.5) - 10 = -$8.3 * (5 * 12 * 20)

Real Money
-$8.3 * (5 * 12 * 20) = -9,960 ; therefore the 'cheaper' rig $2,000 - $9,960 = -$7,960

So I lost almost $8,000 by saving $2,000 on a rig over 5 years; that would be brilliant on my part if I were so dumb. Servers, they have absolute deadlines - period and no second place. My data MUST be complied and ready by 6:00AM everyday. I've seen us finish at 5:30AM, and VERY quickly had Dell rush me out additional servers ASAP.

I'm not poo-pooing anyone, I'm trying to get perspective. The first paragraph was clear. I seriously doubt that you Professional Photography load will get in the way of any PC you choose, and I'm certain the SB will be a marked improvement.

Good Luck & Enjoy.
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January 10, 2011 2:58:32 PM

Yeah. Honestly, just for my imaging work I could just add RAM and update to a 64bit OS and solve most of my problems. I'm still running XP 32bit on my imaging workstation because it, well it works and does what I need to do, although some batch processing in Lightroom seems to really drag on this machine now. But I have fairly regular Photoshop crashes now as well that I'm doing A LOT of wide format custom printing for clients. Get RAM error messages now but that is more an XP issue. I'll still multi-boot 32bit XP in any situation just because I do run some older hardware that may or may not play nice with Windows 7. For that matter I'll keep my old system intact.

Sounds like your situation is a little different than mine, but I appreciate the advice you've given here and earlier as well. You already steered me clear of a GPU mistake I was about to make and turned me on to something I knew nothing about. You're right, this system isn't make or break by any stretch. Most of my work is architectural photography and wide-format printing. But I apply a pretty conservative bent to every purchase just as habit. 20 years in and I'm doing OK in this business, and I've watched MANY of my compadres fold over the years due in no small part to buying the "latest and greatest" because they, ahem, "needed" it to "grow." For example I still shoot large format film for my images that will be printed really large. To get the digital equivalent I would need to spend about $30,000 - $40,000. $30K buys a lot of film. Some of the environments I work in don't play nice with batteries or electricity, and if I drop a film back into a river or off a parking deck I'm not out $30K. So, I could pay $30K for something that doesn't even work as well FOR ME. These are the mistakes I've seen some very skilled and talented photogs make and went under in no small part due to these sorts of rationalized purchases. No, a computer or workstation alone isn't going to do that, but I've noticed folks who are loose with the purse strings on little things are usually habitual violators and are loose with the larger purchases as well. Being an independent freelance anything usually means the lean operations survive. Man I've seen some really talented big spenders perish, especially over the last 5 years.

So I tend to probably do a little too much research on every purchase. But, I usually end up with good stuff that does what I need it to do, and I have enough knowledge to do most of the work myself. Sometimes just enough knowledge to screw things up. But, after a couple of screw-ups I can do it all myself. Know plenty of folks who went broke always paying other people to do things they should have learned how to do themselves, too. No excuse for that in this day and age, what with the inter-tubes and all.
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a c 716 V Motherboard
January 10, 2011 3:38:07 PM

I have my wife on an i7 930 + SSD + RAID 1 set-up and for what she does it's a joke; Outlook, Business data, Word... My thought was it will last and serve her very well for at least 3~5 years. She does like the 'instant' document finding/opening, but I could have saved 50% and have no real loss to her time.

Trust me, 'I get money.' I get 'research.' I take you as no fool, and if anything I get people to really think and try to point them in the best direction possible!

If I were you then my priorities would be a FAST SSD, the fastest are PCIe based and in excess of 700MB/s and a good GPU; beyond 'pokey' SATA2 and yep faster than SATA3 - trying to be funny. The CPU is important but without 'fast everything else' it is unbalanced. Running ~ 5GHz waiting on data to load -- think about it, even a fast SSD is by far the slowest thing in a rig. I'm looking forward to 'reliable' enterprise SSD over hot/noisy/expensive but reliable SAS.

Fast SSDs -> http://www.newegg.com/Product/Productcompare.aspx?Submi...|20-227-597^20-227-597-TS,20-227-578^20-227-578-TS,20-227-598^20-227-598-TS,20-227-659^20-227-659-TS,20-227-660^20-227-660-TS

It's as strong or as fast as the weakest link.

More to digest. :) 
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January 10, 2011 4:08:42 PM

Heh, those ought to be called FAST RAID SSD's, cause that's what they are. 4 onboard SF controllers in four-way RAID 0, running in a 4x PCIe slot.

That could be problematic with multi GPU setups. Not sure I'd want my data so close to the heat from one GTX 580 SC, much less 2- and that's IF it would all fit on the MB. But in a server situation, way cool. Sick throughput.
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a c 716 V Motherboard
January 10, 2011 4:47:32 PM

ASUS P8P67 PRO Blue/Grey for GPU(s), Black PCIe x4 SSD.
Specs:
{GPU}2 x PCIe 2.0 x16 (single at x16 or dual at x8/x8 mode)
{SSD}1 x PCIe 2.0 x16 * [Black] (max. at x4 mode, compatible with PCIe x1 and x4 devices)

Nope, the RevoDrive will work fine, it's PCIe x4. I'm not suggesting that you 'store' your photos on it, but I'm suggesting that the {OS + Apps + Scratch + Working Images} are stored on it. Yes, it's RAID 0 internally, but don't compare it to buying 4 SSDs and running them off your MOBO 'cheap' onboard RAID; it's night and day different.

I'm looking at a 256GB 240GB RevoDrive for my home/office rigs on an X68. I plan on using them as testing drives for SQL comparisons; we're constantly refining PHP code - so I compare a server compile to WS 'test code' compile and write additional code to compare the 2 results.

RevoDrive or not I would strongly look at utilizing SSD. Typical 'new' SATA3 SSDs are 300MB/s+ Read & ~200MB/s+ Write or twice the speed of an HDD ~140 MB/s and never fragment - period; it's N/A in solid state.
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January 10, 2011 8:57:59 PM

i think we all should just buy an HP superdome and plop it in your back room and call it a day.
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a c 716 V Motherboard
January 10, 2011 10:58:14 PM

Do they color coordinate? Maybe a Two-For day?
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January 20, 2011 7:06:54 AM

I wouldn't go x58... i mean why opt for a dead socket? not to upset any x58 owners, it's still a very powerful setup, don't get me wrong, but you're going to see one last cpu for it if i'm correct. the 990X? or was that just a rumour?

I myself am going for SB... Ivy and bulldozer sounds more server based really. I can't see 8 cores of being any use just yet, or within the next two years (for what i do).

as for the SSD/HD debate. i'm with you, but then, you could just stack your PC full of RAM and have windows cache the lot. thus reducing HD activity. we do that at work on our out of date progress DB to help with queries. sure, just means you need to leave your pc on FOREVER to get any benefits. lawllol.

my two cents.

Upgrading from a q9550.
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a b V Motherboard
January 20, 2011 8:26:31 AM

rolli59 said:
If you are not going with dual GPU why not consider the std P8P67 http://www.asus.com/compare.aspx


EXACTLY what he said. You're not a hardcore gamer or overclocker, so I'd recommend the i5 2500K (not getting the K is just a waste of money, as the difference in price is about -> . <- so small), with the standard P8P67 motherboard. You are running one GPU, so extra PCI-E slots are unneeded. Also, you can use the saved money on that single GPU and then get a bit better GFX card to last you a few months longer.
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a b V Motherboard
January 20, 2011 11:02:42 AM



Unless you plan to OC or use SLI, the standard P8P67 seems to be enough.
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January 20, 2011 11:57:57 AM

gamerk316 said:

Unless you plan to OC or use SLI, the standard P8P67 seems to be enough.


Don't plan to OC or use SLI, but would like to keep those options available in the future, so I'm leaning towards the P8P67 Pro. The i5 2500k bundle deal is gone from Microcenter now and Newegg is sold out of the pros, so while I wait I guess I'll see what other P67 boards emerge in the next month or so.
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a c 716 V Motherboard
January 21, 2011 2:38:45 PM

The following chart is what I would go by for building any PC today that makes sense. I am tired of the X58 vs P67 vs X68 arguments. If you don't get it then use Google to look up the benches e.g. - http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/285590-30-tomshardwar... I'm still looking for more.



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January 30, 2011 6:08:52 AM

Hey, The only reason I would suggest you go to Deluxe version is, if you have spare $$$ and you dont know how to spend it... See, the deluxe is not bad, but not THAT much better than Pro, as it adds just few more features, which you can happily ignore most of the time. If you have money, if you want better performance, spend it on good GPU. Else if you want faster PC, spend it on SSD. Dont waste on spending money for just a few more specs which actually doesnt bring boost to your system.
Be wise, choose Wise

Arun.S
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February 22, 2011 3:21:43 AM

jaquith said:
The following chart is what I would go by for building any PC today that makes sense. I am tired of the X58 vs P67 vs X68 arguments. If you don't get it then use Google to look up the benches e.g. - http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/285590-30-tomshardwar... I'm still looking for more.

http://i1013.photobucket.com/albums/af254/Jaquith/Build_Chart_Q1-2011-1.jpg




Have you seen this one?
http://www.hardwareheaven.com/reviews/1098/pg1/asrock-extreme4-p67-and-fatal1ty-professional-p67-vs-x58-with-core-i7-950-review-introduction.html
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