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3 routers 1 modem set up

Hello,
i have 3 routers.

i want to use router1 as gateway.

then router2 & router3 as workgroup routers.

is this possible, and with internet service available to all?
5 answers Last reply Best Answer
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  1. Best answer
    If you want to use additional routers AS DIFFERENT SUBNETS, then yes, you can do that. You just connect the WAN port of routers #2 and #3 to LAN ports on router #1. The WAN port defines the boundary between different subnets. Routers #2 and #3 will receive their WAN IP from router #1. And any clients using routers #2 and #3 will have their internet traffic routed to their respective routers and forwarded to router #1 and out to the Internet. It's just works.

    Just make sure each router uses different IP scopes. IOW, if we assume router #1 is using 192.168.1.x, then perhaps router #2 uses 192.168.2.x and router #3 uses 192.168.3.x.

    That’s about it. The only downside is when you have unsolicited traffic from the Internet (e.g., someone trying to remotely access some machine behind router #2 or #3). Having to deal w/ firewalls and port forwarding across MULTIPLE routers could be a PITA. But you can do it.

    Btw, realize based on the configuration I’ve outlined, clients of router #2 can’t see/access clients of router #3, and vice versa. Their respective firewalls prevent it. However, clients of router #2 and router #3 can see/access clients of router #1.

    You could also chain the routers, in order (router #1->router #2->router #3, always using the WAN port). Clients of router #1 can’t see/access clients of router #2 or router #3. However, clients of router #2 can see/access clients of router #1. And clients of router #3 can see/access clients of router #1 and #2.

    So it just depends on what you’re trying to achieve that determines the proper configuration.
  2. Absolutely. Connect router 1 to the Internet. Connect routers 2 and 3 to router 1. Use static IP addresses for the Internet port on routers 2 and 3 and a different network for all 3 routers.

    Example:

    Router 1
    Internet IP address provided by your ISP
    LAN IP address 192.168.1.1
    DHCP 192.168.1.100-192.168.1.254

    Router 2
    Internet IP address 192.168.1.2 (connected to router 1)
    LAN IP network 192.168.2.1
    DHCP 192.168.2.100-192.168.2.254


    Router 3
    Internet IP address 192.168.1.3 (connected to router 1)
    LAN IP network 192.168.3.1
    DHCP 192.168.3.100-192.168.3.254
  3. Best answer selected by markfom.
  4. Hey,

    i'm trying to setup 2 routers on 1 modem, but i'm trying to achieve a different goal here - is it possible to have router #1 running one IP (let's say local/main provider), and router #2, being connected to #1, still run a different IP, configured via VPN.

    Issue i'm having is that I want to be able to access Netflix while out of the country on the #2 router and still have strong signal for other activities on the main router :)

    Any ideas ?
  5. eibgrad said:
    If you want to use additional routers AS DIFFERENT SUBNETS, then yes, you can do that. You just connect the WAN port of routers #2 and #3 to LAN ports on router #1. The WAN port defines the boundary between different subnets. Routers #2 and #3 will receive their WAN IP from router #1. And any clients using routers #2 and #3 will have their internet traffic routed to their respective routers and forwarded to router #1 and out to the Internet. It's just works.

    Just make sure each router uses different IP scopes. IOW, if we assume router #1 is using 192.168.1.x, then perhaps router #2 uses 192.168.2.x and router #3 uses 192.168.3.x.

    That’s about it. The only downside is when you have unsolicited traffic from the Internet (e.g., someone trying to remotely access some machine behind router #2 or #3). Having to deal w/ firewalls and port forwarding across MULTIPLE routers could be a PITA. But you can do it.

    Btw, realize based on the configuration I’ve outlined, clients of router #2 can’t see/access clients of router #3, and vice versa. Their respective firewalls prevent it. However, clients of router #2 and router #3 can see/access clients of router #1.

    You could also chain the routers, in order (router #1->router #2->router #3, always using the WAN port). Clients of router #1 can’t see/access clients of router #2 or router #3. However, clients of router #2 can see/access clients of router #1. And clients of router #3 can see/access clients of router #1 and #2.

    So it just depends on what you’re trying to achieve that determines the proper configuration.



    I am currently using the above solution you provided after hearing about it on security now i found your instructions thank you. I have just bought a netgear WNDR3700v4 and it allows a 2.5 and a 5 wireless network and 2.5 and 5 guest network each with own password and something called network isolation. i am wondering if the isolation between these four networks is equal in security to above solution and if any can see wired as well
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