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Gigabyte GA-P67A-UD5 + 2600K - DEFECTIVEx2

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January 15, 2011 10:07:15 PM

This is a story of mega-fail by Gigabyte...

My friend, Chris, and I ordered parts from Newegg last Sunday (9th) to build new Intel Sandy Bridge LGA 1155 systems.

We ordered the same parts except for memory...

-Intel Core i7-2600K Sandy Bridge 3.4GHz (3.8GHz Turbo Boost) LGA 1155 95W Quad-Core Desktop Processor BX80623I72600K
-GIGABYTE GA-P67A-UD5 LGA 1155 Intel P67 SATA 6Gb/s USB 3.0 ATX Intel Motherboard
-G.SKILL Sniper 8GB (2 x 4GB) 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM DDR3 1600 (PC3 12800) Desktop Memory Model F3-12800CL9D-8GBSR (Nick)
-G.SKILL Ripjaws X Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM DDR3 1600 (PC3 12800) Desktop Memory Model F3-12800CL9D-8GBXL (Chris)
-CORSAIR HX Series CMPSU-850HX 850W ATX12V 2.3 / EPS12V 2.91 80 PLUS SILVER Certified Modular Active PFC Power Supply
-Thermalright Venomous X - RT 120mm CPU Cooler
-Arctic Silver 5 Thermal Compound - OEM

...and we both of us received DEFECTIVE Gigabyte GA-P67A-UD5 boards. :( 

By defective I mean, both boards boot, but there is NO DISPLAY if you plug a video card into the 1st PCIe (x16) slot. Both work if you plug the video card into the 2nd PCIe (x8) slot or even the 3rd PCIe (x4) slot. Additionally, on Chris's board, only the 4th DIMM slot works. Plugging RAM into any of the other three DIMM slots on Chris's board makes it unbootable.

The trouble LEDs (awesome feature) on the GA-P67A-UD5 board confirm these problems. When a video card is plugged into the 1st PCIe (x16) slot, the PCIe trouble LED light comes on. When RAM is plugged into the 1st, 2nd, or 3rd DIMM slot of Chris's mobo, the DIMM trouble LED comes on.

Answers to questions you probably have:

Yes, we called Gigabyte Tech Support (626-854-9338) and went through hours of troubleshooting. Gigabyte confirmed that these boards are both defective and should be exchanged. The Gigabyte tech suspects that there is a bad controller chip on this batch of boards. How big is a "batch" I wonder?

Yes, we tried booting them outside of any case. They are resting on the anti-static bags they came in, which are resting on firm antistatic foam sleeves. In or out of a case makes no difference, both boards boot with the same PCIe and DIMM slot defects listed above.

Yes, we tried multiple video cards. We tried two different XFX Radeon 5870 cards, an EVGA GeForce 8800 GT, and an EVGA GeForce 8800 GTX. All these video cards work in these systems (and in our old Core2Quad systems), BUT NOT in the 1st PCIe (x16) slot on our GA-P67A-UD5 boards.

Yes, we tried the DDR3 RAM individually in both boards and in every slot. All the RAM (Sniper and Ripjaws) boots in my GA-P67A-UD5 in any DIMM slot, and all the RAM boots in Chris's 4th DIMM slot. None of the RAM will boot if placed in Chris's 1st, 2nd, or 3rd DIMM slot.

Yes, we tried new firmware. They came with F2, we upgraded to F3, F5 and beta F6a. No change.

No, I don't think we are newbs. :kaola:  We both work in IT as system admins, building and maintaining servers and desktop systems and we have been building our own systems for 10+ years.

No, I'm not here to deride Gigabyte. We like Gigabyte. We both have Intel Core2Quad systems with Gigabyte GA-P35-DS3R boards that we built 3.5 years ago. Those systems have been overclocked to 3.6GHz and have been rock solid for 3.5 years. No problems at all.

We have ordered new Gigabyte GA-P67A-UD5 boards from Newegg and opened return RMA's for these defective boards. I'll update after the new boards are installed on Monday night.

Has anyone else had good or bad experiences with a Gigabyte LGA 1155 board?

Nick
January 17, 2011 1:03:40 AM

What I feel in this post is that you guys may check on the LGA socket pins carefully when you have free time to do so.
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a b V Motherboard
January 17, 2011 1:27:24 AM

nickdouglas said:
This is a story of mega-fail by Gigabyte...

My friend, Chris, and I ordered parts from Newegg last Sunday (9th) to build new Intel Sandy Bridge LGA 1155 systems.

We ordered the same parts except for memory...

-Intel Core i7-2600K Sandy Bridge 3.4GHz (3.8GHz Turbo Boost) LGA 1155 95W Quad-Core Desktop Processor BX80623I72600K
-GIGABYTE GA-P67A-UD5 LGA 1155 Intel P67 SATA 6Gb/s USB 3.0 ATX Intel Motherboard
-G.SKILL Sniper 8GB (2 x 4GB) 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM DDR3 1600 (PC3 12800) Desktop Memory Model F3-12800CL9D-8GBSR (Nick)
-G.SKILL Ripjaws X Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM DDR3 1600 (PC3 12800) Desktop Memory Model F3-12800CL9D-8GBXL (Chris)
-CORSAIR HX Series CMPSU-850HX 850W ATX12V 2.3 / EPS12V 2.91 80 PLUS SILVER Certified Modular Active PFC Power Supply
-Thermalright Venomous X - RT 120mm CPU Cooler
-Arctic Silver 5 Thermal Compound - OEM

...and we both of us received DEFECTIVE Gigabyte GA-P67A-UD5 boards. :( 

By defective I mean, both boards boot, but there is NO DISPLAY if you plug a video card into the 1st PCIe (x16) slot. Both work if you plug the video card into the 2nd PCIe (x8) slot or even the 3rd PCIe (x4) slot. Additionally, on Chris's board, only the 4th DIMM slot works. Plugging RAM into any of the other three DIMM slots on Chris's board makes it unbootable.

The trouble LEDs (awesome feature) on the GA-P67A-UD5 board confirm these problems. When a video card is plugged into the 1st PCIe (x16) slot, the PCIe trouble LED light comes on. When RAM is plugged into the 1st, 2nd, or 3rd DIMM slot of Chris's mobo, the DIMM trouble LED comes on.

Answers to questions you probably have:

Yes, we called Gigabyte Tech Support (626-854-9338) and went through hours of troubleshooting. Gigabyte confirmed that these boards are both defective and should be exchanged. The Gigabyte tech suspects that there is a bad controller chip on this batch of boards. How big is a "batch" I wonder?

Yes, we tried booting them outside of any case. They are resting on the anti-static bags they came in, which are resting on firm antistatic foam sleeves. In or out of a case makes no difference, both boards boot with the same PCIe and DIMM slot defects listed above.

Yes, we tried multiple video cards. We tried two different XFX Radeon 5870 cards, an EVGA GeForce 8800 GT, and an EVGA GeForce 8800 GTX. All these video cards work in these systems (and in our old Core2Quad systems), BUT NOT in the 1st PCIe (x16) slot on our GA-P67A-UD5 boards.

Yes, we tried the DDR3 RAM individually in both boards and in every slot. All the RAM (Sniper and Ripjaws) boots in my GA-P67A-UD5 in any DIMM slot, and all the RAM boots in Chris's 4th DIMM slot. None of the RAM will boot if placed in Chris's 1st, 2nd, or 3rd DIMM slot.

Yes, we tried new firmware. They came with F2, we upgraded to F3, F5 and beta F6a. No change.

No, I don't think we are newbs. :kaola:  We both work in IT as system admins, building and maintaining servers and desktop systems and we have been building our own systems for 10+ years.

No, I'm not here to deride Gigabyte. We like Gigabyte. We both have Intel Core2Quad systems with Gigabyte GA-P35-DS3R boards that we built 3.5 years ago. Those systems have been overclocked to 3.6GHz and have been rock solid for 3.5 years. No problems at all.

We have ordered new Gigabyte GA-P67A-UD5 boards from Newegg and opened return RMA's for these defective boards. I'll update after the new boards are installed on Monday night.

Has anyone else had good or bad experiences with a Gigabyte LGA 1155 board?

Nick


I've had good experiences, but anyway...

Even though you tested in the case first, I just wanted to tell you not to test any motherboard on its anti-static bag. Anti-static bags are CONDUCTIVE. Being conductive is what makes them anti-static. Now they're not GOOD conductors, but the idea of putting a board down on a piece of "barely insulated tin foil" makes me cringe...
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a c 177 V Motherboard
January 17, 2011 8:25:14 PM

Crash - I believe the no-no re anti-stat is covered in the sticky... While connecting a few score 5 or 10K resistors across random solder points on a MOBO won't likely let the magic smoke out, it certainly isn't going to do any good! I wanted to ask if you were the one who gave me the tip about using a phone book for breadboarding? I do it every build, added it to a couple stickies, and for the life of me, can't remember who told me about it, so I can give proper credit for the citations! They're almost useless these days for any other purpose, come in a variety of thicknesses to accomodate short case/PSU wiring, and are heavy enough to prevent accidentally disturbing your platform [:bilbat:5]
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a b V Motherboard
January 17, 2011 9:00:00 PM

bilbat said:
Crash - I believe the no-no re anti-stat is covered in the sticky... While connecting a few score 5 or 10K resistors across random solder points on a MOBO won't likely let the magic smoke out, it certainly isn't going to do any good! I wanted to ask if you were the one who gave me the tip about using a phone book for breadboarding? I do it every build, added it to a couple stickies, and for the life of me, can't remember who told me about it, so I can give proper credit for the citations! They're almost useless these days for any other purpose, come in a variety of thicknesses to accomodate short case/PSU wiring, and are heavy enough to prevent accidentally disturbing your platform [:bilbat:5]

Yes, while others were using the motherboard's box, I was using phone books. They're heavier (even the thin ones) and don't slide around as easily, they're flatter with more support, and even the thin ones stand high enough to allow card ends to overhang.
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a c 717 V Motherboard
January 17, 2011 9:32:14 PM

Gigabyte still hasn't changed! LOL!

Gigabyte did the same thing on the UD3R's; I had to RMA 10 defective GA MOBO's in a row - batches can be in the thousands!

IMO exchange for ASUS P8P67 PRO, or ASUS P8P67 EVO ; otherwise hold on for either the ASUS Maximus IV Extreme or EVGA P67 Classified.
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Productcompare.aspx?Submi...|13-131-695^13-131-695-TS,13-157-225^13-157-225-TS,13-128-464^13-128-464-TS,13-131-682^13-131-682-TS
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a c 177 V Motherboard
January 18, 2011 1:28:41 AM

Crash - thanks, will add credits to the places where I suggest the yellow pages [:isamuelson:8]

Ya know - I've used a box or two, and thought recently of something odd... I wonder if the shiny foil stamped logos are conductive? Usually, I give the folks I build for their MOBO box, with the manual, disc, and socket cover - in case they might need to RMA. Never have gotten a bad board, so I just happen to have the box from the last build - will report back tomorrow! Would do it tonight yet, but spent most of the day scraping and blowing the last six or eight inches of global warming off the sidewalk, driveway, and yard - feel like a wrung-out dishrag :cry: 

Here's a pic of the last one to go together, phone book and all:



Wondered if you've visited my site - might get a kick out of the bbcode - wish I could transplant it here! Give a read to the 'sticky prologue', & then peek at the familiar GB guide - I'm like a kid inna candy shop [:jaydeejohn:3] Trying to figure out how to back up my database, to install an upgrade to the forum s'ware & enable mimeTeX equation editing next...
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January 18, 2011 11:05:53 PM

Update...

Replacement boards are NOT defective x2! Hooray! :) 

We both received our replacement GA-P67A-UD5 boards and installed them. All PCIe and DIMM slots are working.

My i7-2600K (Batch#: L040B208) was stuck at 4.5GHz on stock F2 BIOS and was still stuck at 4.5GHz on the F5 BIOS. Upgrading to beta F6a BIOS finally allowed me to achieve 4.8GHz so far. At 4.8GHz with Prime95 running 8 threads the CPU temp only reaches 56C so heat doesn't seem to be the limiting factor. I'm hoping for 5.0GHz with a little more tweaking.

Thanks for the advice about not using the anti-static bags. I learned something new.

As for the GA-P67A-UD5 board, overall I'm quite happy now that I have a working copy. Only minor complaint is that after a crash it tends to declare the main BIOS corrupt too often and ends up reloading from the backup BIOS, which is still the stock F2 version. This was very annoying until I figured out that I could copy the main BIOS to the backup BIOS. I wish the ALT+F12 boot option to do that wasn't hidden and didn't require a PS/2 keyboard.

Nick
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January 19, 2011 11:03:06 PM

nickdouglas said:
This is a story of mega-fail by Gigabyte...

My friend, Chris, and I ordered parts from Newegg last Sunday (9th) to build new Intel Sandy Bridge LGA 1155 systems.

We ordered the same parts except for memory...

-Intel Core i7-2600K Sandy Bridge 3.4GHz (3.8GHz Turbo Boost) LGA 1155 95W Quad-Core Desktop Processor BX80623I72600K
-GIGABYTE GA-P67A-UD5 LGA 1155 Intel P67 SATA 6Gb/s USB 3.0 ATX Intel Motherboard
-G.SKILL Sniper 8GB (2 x 4GB) 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM DDR3 1600 (PC3 12800) Desktop Memory Model F3-12800CL9D-8GBSR (Nick)
-G.SKILL Ripjaws X Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM DDR3 1600 (PC3 12800) Desktop Memory Model F3-12800CL9D-8GBXL (Chris)
-CORSAIR HX Series CMPSU-850HX 850W ATX12V 2.3 / EPS12V 2.91 80 PLUS SILVER Certified Modular Active PFC Power Supply
-Thermalright Venomous X - RT 120mm CPU Cooler
-Arctic Silver 5 Thermal Compound - OEM

...and we both of us received DEFECTIVE Gigabyte GA-P67A-UD5 boards. :( 

By defective I mean, both boards boot, but there is NO DISPLAY if you plug a video card into the 1st PCIe (x16) slot. Both work if you plug the video card into the 2nd PCIe (x8) slot or even the 3rd PCIe (x4) slot. Additionally, on Chris's board, only the 4th DIMM slot works. Plugging RAM into any of the other three DIMM slots on Chris's board makes it unbootable.

The trouble LEDs (awesome feature) on the GA-P67A-UD5 board confirm these problems. When a video card is plugged into the 1st PCIe (x16) slot, the PCIe trouble LED light comes on. When RAM is plugged into the 1st, 2nd, or 3rd DIMM slot of Chris's mobo, the DIMM trouble LED comes on.

Answers to questions you probably have:

Yes, we called Gigabyte Tech Support (626-854-9338) and went through hours of troubleshooting. Gigabyte confirmed that these boards are both defective and should be exchanged. The Gigabyte tech suspects that there is a bad controller chip on this batch of boards. How big is a "batch" I wonder?

Yes, we tried booting them outside of any case. They are resting on the anti-static bags they came in, which are resting on firm antistatic foam sleeves. In or out of a case makes no difference, both boards boot with the same PCIe and DIMM slot defects listed above.

Yes, we tried multiple video cards. We tried two different XFX Radeon 5870 cards, an EVGA GeForce 8800 GT, and an EVGA GeForce 8800 GTX. All these video cards work in these systems (and in our old Core2Quad systems), BUT NOT in the 1st PCIe (x16) slot on our GA-P67A-UD5 boards.

Yes, we tried the DDR3 RAM individually in both boards and in every slot. All the RAM (Sniper and Ripjaws) boots in my GA-P67A-UD5 in any DIMM slot, and all the RAM boots in Chris's 4th DIMM slot. None of the RAM will boot if placed in Chris's 1st, 2nd, or 3rd DIMM slot.

Yes, we tried new firmware. They came with F2, we upgraded to F3, F5 and beta F6a. No change.

No, I don't think we are newbs. :kaola:  We both work in IT as system admins, building and maintaining servers and desktop systems and we have been building our own systems for 10+ years.

No, I'm not here to deride Gigabyte. We like Gigabyte. We both have Intel Core2Quad systems with Gigabyte GA-P35-DS3R boards that we built 3.5 years ago. Those systems have been overclocked to 3.6GHz and have been rock solid for 3.5 years. No problems at all.

We have ordered new Gigabyte GA-P67A-UD5 boards from Newegg and opened return RMA's for these defective boards. I'll update after the new boards are installed on Monday night.

Has anyone else had good or bad experiences with a Gigabyte LGA 1155 board?

Nick



Hi Mate,

I've got some wired problems, not sure if it's my motherboard or the CPU.

Bought a UD5 motherboard and an i7-2600 but it's been nothing but a nightmare.

Firstly, I manage to burn my 1st motherboard and don't know how but got a replacement.

The replacements is driving me nuts. I keep getting heaps of memory dump errors.

I did a few steps of trying to identify what the problem is but am still not clear of it. I installed 2x4GB (8GB) dimms at 1600MHz and am running on Win7 64-bit pro.

Something I've noticed last night is that everytime the CPU tends to do a bit more than 'one' thing, it freezes and crashes. I did a Memtest86 when both the memory modules were in and it runs upto 5% in 2 seconds and freezes. Then I removed one module and it passes the test. I plugged in the other module thinking its my memory that is defective and that passed the test as well. So I tried it with the remaining memory slots and it all worked well. But for some reason when I put in both modules the test fails.

Also, when both modules are in and running the OS, I can't run 2 installations tat the same time it freezes. But if I remove one module and run 2 installations it runs a bit longer and then freezes.

It's either the motherboard has some defect somewhere or my CPU is in an intermittent state of failing.

Can someone please give me some advised?

Kind regards,
Don.
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January 20, 2011 12:40:53 AM

Update your BIOS first. Check your LGA socket pins and then put your memory in Memtest. Try another processor in the last.
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January 20, 2011 12:43:36 AM

Don,

Sorry to hear about your problems with this board. It certainly is disappointing, but it will get better!

My first instinct is to ask about your power supply. Not enough power can cause the CPU to crash when it gets busy. More memory modules also require more power, so that may be why one works a little better than two.

The other big cause of instability is heat. Have you installed the EasyTune6 and or some other temperature monitor and watched to see if your CPU is getting too hot?

Another possibility is that the motherboard does not like your memory even though there is nothing wrong with it. I have had trouble running my RAM at 1600MHz. Have you tried running it at 1333MHz to see if that helps? Also, newer BIOS versions may make the board work better with more types of memory. Have you upgraded to BIOS to the latest version? (http://www.gigabyte.com/support-downloads/support-downl...)

- Upgrade your BIOS.
- Check on the CPU temperature.
- Then try a different/stronger power supply and different memory if you can.
- If they will exchange the CPU, you could try that too, but it's not likely to be the problem.

Good luck!

Nick
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January 20, 2011 4:26:22 AM

nickdouglas said:
Don,

Sorry to hear about your problems with this board. It certainly is disappointing, but it will get better!

My first instinct is to ask about your power supply. Not enough power can cause the CPU to crash when it gets busy. More memory modules also require more power, so that may be why one works a little better than two.

The other big cause of instability is heat. Have you installed the EasyTune6 and or some other temperature monitor and watched to see if your CPU is getting too hot?

Another possibility is that the motherboard does not like your memory even though there is nothing wrong with it. I have had trouble running my RAM at 1600MHz. Have you tried running it at 1333MHz to see if that helps? Also, newer BIOS versions may make the board work better with more types of memory. Have you upgraded to BIOS to the latest version? (http://www.gigabyte.com/support-downloads/support-downl...)

- Upgrade your BIOS.
- Check on the CPU temperature.
- Then try a different/stronger power supply and different memory if you can.
- If they will exchange the CPU, you could try that too, but it's not likely to be the problem.

Good luck!

Nick


Hi Nick,

Thanks heaps for the prompt reply and info.

I bought a Thermaltake V4 case which came with a 450W power supply. When the PC initially started to crash, I thought it was the PSU as well so I put in a 600W PSU, but that didn't solve the problem. My configuration is quite simple. I've got a Gigabyte 5450 1GB onboard graphics card and currently only 1TB 7200rpm HDD (just to start with before I move the rest of my HDDs over)

The memory that I installed are the Ripjaws 8GB G.Skill F3-12800CL9D-8GBRL. Just to get a confirmation from GSkill, I sent an email asking them if this memory has been tested against the P67 1155 socket motherboards and they replied saying that this particular memory was not released for the P67 and a new series called Ripjaws X has been released and tested against the P67. So, I'm hoping to change the memory to the Ripjaws X and try that out. Like you mentioned, perhaps my motherboard just doesn't like this memory since it hasn't been tested with the P67.

Also, since DDR3 runs at 1333Mhz by default, I thought this was a problem as well, but even after changing it to run at 1600MHz there was no improvement.

I did install EasyTune6 but didn't get a chance to monitor the temperature. Although every now and again after a crash when the PC restarts I go into the BIOS and check the temperature and found that it was running anywhere between 47-52 degrees, which I think it quite good.

I also very reluctantly updated the BIOS, 'cause I didn't want it to crash while updating the BIOS and managed to update it to F5. There is a F6 which is a Beta and the site says it's still a working version with not all the features released in it, but I'm not too sure if I should update it to this version 'till they release an official F6. What are your thoughts on it mate?

So I'm hoping after I change the memory to the Ripjaws X it would work better. I'll keep you posted as to what I find.

Really appreciated your feedback mate, as there was no body I could turn to who knew about the new chipsets since it pretty new out here.

Don't laugh, but my the current PC I have is a Pentium D, 4GB at 800MHz which is 5 years old running on Vista 32-bit... haaaaa haaaaa haaaaaa...

So it's a huge upgrade for me.. hahahhahaha....

Don.
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a b V Motherboard
January 20, 2011 5:38:53 AM

kishandb said:
The memory that I installed are the Ripjaws 8GB G.Skill F3-12800CL9D-8GBRL. Just to get a confirmation from GSkill, I sent an email asking them if this memory has been tested against the P67 1155 socket motherboards and they replied saying that this particular memory was not released for the P67 and a new series called Ripjaws X has been released and tested against the P67. So, I'm hoping to change the memory to the Ripjaws X and try that out. Like you mentioned, perhaps my motherboard just doesn't like this memory since it hasn't been tested with the P67.
Easy answers usually don't mean much.

I've had this conversation with a few memory manufacturers already, and most have already admitted that their P67 memory lines will have identical hardware to existing P55 parts. The only real difference you'll see is that they're removing invalid XMP ratios such as 1800, 2000, and 2200, since those all required drastic changes in BCLK. 1333, 1600, 1866, and 2133 still work.

Edit: Also, please try putting the memory in slots DDR3_2 and DDR3_4
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January 21, 2011 1:41:55 AM

Crashman said:
Easy answers usually don't mean much.

I've had this conversation with a few memory manufacturers already, and most have already admitted that their P67 memory lines will have identical hardware to existing P55 parts. The only real difference you'll see is that they're removing invalid XMP ratios such as 1800, 2000, and 2200, since those all required drastic changes in BCLK. 1333, 1600, 1866, and 2133 still work.

Edit: Also, please try putting the memory in slots DDR3_2 and DDR3_4



This is exactly what I suspected. These products are the exact same memory under different colored heat-spreaders:

P55 version - G.SKILL Sniper 8GB (2 x 4GB) 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM DDR3 1600 (PC3 12800) Desktop Memory Model F3-12800CL9D-8GBSR (http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...)

P67 version - G.SKILL Ripjaws X Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM DDR3 1600 (PC3 12800) Desktop Memory Model F3-12800CL9D-8GBXL (http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...)

The new versions just says "Designed for Intel P67 motherboard." It's the same memory...same timings, same voltage, same price, even the same model number except for the last two characters. Both products will perform exactly the same in your new system.

Even the X58 version is the same memory, just marketed in a three-pack:

X58 version - G.SKILL Ripjaws Series 12GB (3 x 4GB) 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM DDR3 1600 (PC3 12800) Desktop Memory Model F3-12800CL9T-12GBRL (http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...)



Here's another example. Identical memory with different heat-spreaders:

P55 version - G.SKILL Ripjaws Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM DDR3 1600 (PC3 12800) Desktop Memory Model F3-12800CL7D-8GBRH (http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...)

P67 version - G.SKILL Ripjaws X Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM DDR3 1600 (PC3 12800) Desktop Memory Model F3-12800CL7D-8GBXH (http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...)

Nick
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January 21, 2011 2:06:50 AM

kishandb said:
Hi Nick,

Thanks heaps for the prompt reply and info.

I bought a Thermaltake V4 case which came with a 450W power supply. When the PC initially started to crash, I thought it was the PSU as well so I put in a 600W PSU, but that didn't solve the problem. My configuration is quite simple. I've got a Gigabyte 5450 1GB onboard graphics card and currently only 1TB 7200rpm HDD (just to start with before I move the rest of my HDDs over)

The memory that I installed are the Ripjaws 8GB G.Skill F3-12800CL9D-8GBRL. Just to get a confirmation from GSkill, I sent an email asking them if this memory has been tested against the P67 1155 socket motherboards and they replied saying that this particular memory was not released for the P67 and a new series called Ripjaws X has been released and tested against the P67. So, I'm hoping to change the memory to the Ripjaws X and try that out. Like you mentioned, perhaps my motherboard just doesn't like this memory since it hasn't been tested with the P67.

Also, since DDR3 runs at 1333Mhz by default, I thought this was a problem as well, but even after changing it to run at 1600MHz there was no improvement.

I did install EasyTune6 but didn't get a chance to monitor the temperature. Although every now and again after a crash when the PC restarts I go into the BIOS and check the temperature and found that it was running anywhere between 47-52 degrees, which I think it quite good.

I also very reluctantly updated the BIOS, 'cause I didn't want it to crash while updating the BIOS and managed to update it to F5. There is a F6 which is a Beta and the site says it's still a working version with not all the features released in it, but I'm not too sure if I should update it to this version 'till they release an official F6. What are your thoughts on it mate?

So I'm hoping after I change the memory to the Ripjaws X it would work better. I'll keep you posted as to what I find.

Really appreciated your feedback mate, as there was no body I could turn to who knew about the new chipsets since it pretty new out here.

Don't laugh, but my the current PC I have is a Pentium D, 4GB at 800MHz which is 5 years old running on Vista 32-bit... haaaaa haaaaa haaaaaa...

So it's a huge upgrade for me.. hahahhahaha....

Don.



I have been unsuccessful at getting my memory to run at 1600MHz even if I set it manually. It detects and boots at 1333MHz and is stable, but if I increase to the rated 1600MHz, Windows crashes. It sucks that 1.5v RAM that is rated for 1600MHz won't run at 1600MHz. I may exchange it as well. At least if I get the "P67" version then they can't use that as an excuse for it not running at 1600MHz.

I would definitely try the beta BIOS version F6a (or whatever is current). If it doesn't work, you can always go back to F5. Don't worry too much about crashing during the upgrade, that's what the dual-BIOS is for. It should boot from the backup if the main BIOS is corrupted. Of course, it is definitely safer to flash your BIOS with the Q-BIOS boot option. You just need the new BIOS on a USB stick formatted with FAT/FAT32. I try not to use the @BIOS application in Windows.

When Windows crashes, what is the error message? If you don't see an error on a blue-screen, then look for it in Computer Management-->System Tools-->Event Viewer-->Windows Logs-->System. It will have a red "!" and Error / BugCheck / Event ID 1001. Open that error and see what the first string of numbers is, like 0x00000124, or 0x0000003b, etc.

Nick
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January 21, 2011 2:30:42 AM

Quote:
Upgrading to beta F6a BIOS finally allowed me to achieve 4.8GHz so far. At 4.8GHz with Prime95 running 8 threads the CPU temp only reaches 56C so heat doesn't seem to be the limiting factor. I'm hoping for 5.0GHz with a little more tweaking.



Update: After more tweaking, I am able to boot and run Prime95 at 5.0GHz!

The key for me was setting these:
- Internal CPU PLL Overvoltage = Enabled
- Load-line Calibration = Level 1

My "CPU Vcore" is still set to "Auto" and it selects 1.39v on its own in the BIOS. Idle in Windows EasyTune6 says 1.404v and under load it says 1.440v but I'm not sure whether to believe that since it says that under load no matter what ratio I'm at.

My current problem is the system crashes when I go AFK for more than 30 minutes. I have a 0x00000124 and a 0x0000003b bugcheck in the event log and other times no bugcheck was recorded.

Nick
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January 21, 2011 3:04:02 PM

Crashman said:
Easy answers usually don't mean much.

I've had this conversation with a few memory manufacturers already, and most have already admitted that their P67 memory lines will have identical hardware to existing P55 parts. The only real difference you'll see is that they're removing invalid XMP ratios such as 1800, 2000, and 2200, since those all required drastic changes in BCLK. 1333, 1600, 1866, and 2133 still work.

Edit: Also, please try putting the memory in slots DDR3_2 and DDR3_4

Maybe a very few, but you don't suddenly {magically} have faster frequencies + lower CAS without a revamped or completely new IC. 1,866MHz CL7 and 2,133MHz CL8, etc.
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January 21, 2011 5:56:12 PM

jaquith said:
Maybe a very few, but you don't suddenly {magically} have faster frequencies + lower CAS without a revamped or completely new IC. 1,866MHz CL7 and 2,133MHz CL8, etc.
The old Elipida Hyper IC's could do that, even on P67 (I tried it). Patriot told me they still have some of those but would not comment further. Kingston made a bunch of "fixed" modules using them, that's what I have. I believe the answer to the high failure rate was extended burn-in testing.

Someone might have a replacement for Elipida Hyper by now...that I haven't heard about.
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January 21, 2011 7:22:40 PM

Have you tried increasing the memory viltage slightly higher than the specs?
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January 21, 2011 11:29:24 PM

The first time I increased vcore it wasn't stable, but now with the other settings tweaked, I bumped it up to 1.40v and then 1.41v and it's been crash free for 18 hours.

Nick
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January 21, 2011 11:44:26 PM

Crashman said:
Easy answers usually don't mean much.

I've had this conversation with a few memory manufacturers already, and most have already admitted that their P67 memory lines will have identical hardware to existing P55 parts. The only real difference you'll see is that they're removing invalid XMP ratios such as 1800, 2000, and 2200, since those all required drastic changes in BCLK. 1333, 1600, 1866, and 2133 still work.

Edit: Also, please try putting the memory in slots DDR3_2 and DDR3_4



Hi mate,

Thanks for your thoughts as well. I tried putting the memory into slot 2 and 4 as well as 1 and 3, but none of them saves it from crashing after sometime.

I've tried with 1333 instead of 1600 as well, but that didn't work.

So it has to be the motherboard, if not, the CPU.
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January 21, 2011 11:50:18 PM

nickdouglas said:
This is exactly what I suspected. These products are the exact same memory under different colored heat-spreaders:

P55 version - G.SKILL Sniper 8GB (2 x 4GB) 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM DDR3 1600 (PC3 12800) Desktop Memory Model F3-12800CL9D-8GBSR (http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...)

P67 version - G.SKILL Ripjaws X Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM DDR3 1600 (PC3 12800) Desktop Memory Model F3-12800CL9D-8GBXL (http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...)

The new versions just says "Designed for Intel P67 motherboard." It's the same memory...same timings, same voltage, same price, even the same model number except for the last two characters. Both products will perform exactly the same in your new system.

Even the X58 version is the same memory, just marketed in a three-pack:

X58 version - G.SKILL Ripjaws Series 12GB (3 x 4GB) 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM DDR3 1600 (PC3 12800) Desktop Memory Model F3-12800CL9T-12GBRL (http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...)



Here's another example. Identical memory with different heat-spreaders:

P55 version - G.SKILL Ripjaws Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM DDR3 1600 (PC3 12800) Desktop Memory Model F3-12800CL7D-8GBRH (http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...)

P67 version - G.SKILL Ripjaws X Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM DDR3 1600 (PC3 12800) Desktop Memory Model F3-12800CL7D-8GBXH (http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...)

Nick



Hi Nick,

I swapped the F3-12800CL9D-8GBRL to the F3-12800CL9D-8GBXL (Ripjaws X) but it still crashes. I test it by running the Dynamic Energy Saver 2. Let it do it thing and after sometime it just freezes.

This is the 2nd motherboard I'm using. I'll have to take it back and if I could get the motherboard as well as the CPU both replaced that would be better so then I can try to rule it out. If it doesn't work then, I'll just have to get another motherboard by a different manufacturer or a lower model.

Don.
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January 22, 2011 1:54:22 AM

kishandb said:
Hi Nick,

I swapped the F3-12800CL9D-8GBRL to the F3-12800CL9D-8GBXL (Ripjaws X) but it still crashes. I test it by running the Dynamic Energy Saver 2. Let it do it thing and after sometime it just freezes.

This is the 2nd motherboard I'm using. I'll have to take it back and if I could get the motherboard as well as the CPU both replaced that would be better so then I can try to rule it out. If it doesn't work then, I'll just have to get another motherboard by a different manufacturer or a lower model.

Don.
Are you installing these into Slots 2 and 4?
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January 22, 2011 6:51:50 AM

Crashman said:
Are you installing these into Slots 2 and 4?



Yup, did that. Still didn't work. I went to the guys that I bought the CPU from and got them to test the PC and the concluded that it's the Megafail Gigabyte motherboard. So... that would be my 3rd motherboard if I get a replacement.

I'd rather get my money back and go for ASUS.

I've used Gigabyte for about 10 years and have never had any problems and this is the first. But then a colleague of mine who used to build PC had nothing but problems with Gigabyte. And he recomends ASUS

The shop that I bought the CPU from said they've had heaps of problems with Gigabyte as well and they recommend ASUS and they said to go for the P8P67 or the P8P67 Deluxe (which is much dearer). Any recommendations or thoughts on these motherboards guys or anything that anyone can recommend?

I'm not a tweaker or an overclocker. I just want a very fast PC that can multithread and handle heaps of load running multiple apps that are really CPU and memory hungry. I'm not even into games that's why I just got a Gigabyte 5450 1GB onboard graphics card. But I do need heaps of juice to run multiple apps.

I come from a dev background and need to have servers, DB and development tools opened at the same time as well as other PC related software running without slowing down the system.

Don.
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January 22, 2011 7:41:45 AM

kishandb said:
Yup, did that. Still didn't work. I went to the guys that I bought the CPU from and got them to test the PC and the concluded that it's the Megafail Gigabyte motherboard. So... that would be my 3rd motherboard if I get a replacement.

I'd rather get my money back and go for ASUS.

I've used Gigabyte for about 10 years and have never had any problems and this is the first. But then a colleague of mine who used to build PC had nothing but problems with Gigabyte. And he recomends ASUS

The shop that I bought the CPU from said they've had heaps of problems with Gigabyte as well and they recommend ASUS and they said to go for the P8P67 or the P8P67 Deluxe (which is much dearer). Any recommendations or thoughts on these motherboards guys or anything that anyone can recommend?

I'm not a tweaker or an overclocker. I just want a very fast PC that can multithread and handle heaps of load running multiple apps that are really CPU and memory hungry. I'm not even into games that's why I just got a Gigabyte 5450 1GB onboard graphics card. But I do need heaps of juice to run multiple apps.

I come from a dev background and need to have servers, DB and development tools opened at the same time as well as other PC related software running without slowing down the system.

Don.

There is a P67 motherboard roundup on Tom's Hardware...
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January 22, 2011 1:45:12 PM

I assume that you are NOT using XMP and are maunally entering the RAM values??!!

F3-12800CL7D-8GBXH http://www.gskill.com/products.php?index=357

M/B Chipset
Intel P67
CAS Latency 7-8-7-24-2N
Capacity
8GB (4GB x2)
Speed DDR3-1600 (PC3 12800)
Test Voltage 1.6 Volts

CPU: | Slot 1 | Slot 2 | Slot 3 | Slot 4 |
Slots: 1 & 3 ; otherwise 2 & 4 - either is recommended

Extreme Memory Profile (X.M.P.) -> Disabled
System Memory Multiplier -> {16 or 1600MHz} ; BCLK 100 MHz
DRAM Timing Selectable (SPD) - > Quick
CAS Latency Time - > 7
tRCD - > 8
tRP -> 7
tRAS -> 24
Command Rate (CMD) -> 2

The next big issues are the Voltages; begin low {spec} and next try the higher voltages in the range. None of them are 'high.'
DRAM Voltage -> 1.60v~1.65v
QPI/Vtt Voltage -> Auto, or 1.1v~1.22v
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January 22, 2011 5:44:10 PM

jaquith said:
QPI/Vtt Voltage -> Auto, or 1.28v~1.34v
Hmm, I think you're saying Uncore and I think I'm about to say it's around 0.96 to 1.11 V for the P67 "System Agent" by default.
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January 22, 2011 8:42:26 PM

Crashman said:
Hmm, I think you're saying Uncore and I think I'm about to say it's around 0.96 to 1.11 V for the P67 "System Agent" by default.


"QPI/Vtt voltage, formally known as Processor Power for I/O, is the voltage for the integrated memory controller as well as the PCI-E controller. Intel’s Default is 1.050v and Intel's Maximum is (1.05 +/- 3%) 1.080v."


Don,

After manually setting my "System Memory Multiplier (SPD)" to 16.00 and manually setting my timings to 9-9-9-24-1T, I then had to raise my "QPI/Vtt voltage" to 1.100v to remain stable and not crash in Windows. I have read that others have had to go as high as 1.200v to remain stable.

I think you should try this too.

Nick
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January 22, 2011 9:48:08 PM

nickdouglas said:
"QPI/Vtt voltage, formally known as Processor Power for I/O, is the voltage for the integrated memory controller as well as the PCI-E controller. Intel’s Default is 1.050v and Intel's Maximum is (1.05 +/- 3%) 1.080v."
It's also known as "Uncore" on the previous-generation processors because it's the voltage for parts that aren't in the "Core", but it's now called "System Agent" voltage and includes the integrated GPU.

The reason I mention this is because the new processors don't seem to respond well to high System Agent voltage. I haven't been able to do much with settings over 1.25V, but you should check with someone who's done additional experimentation to find out "when, why, and how" to use higher voltage levels.

This of course is important because of the relatively-high memory controller voltage set in some XMP profiles.
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January 23, 2011 1:33:31 AM

Crashman said:
It's also known as "Uncore" on the previous-generation processors because it's the voltage for parts that aren't in the "Core", but it's now called "System Agent" voltage and includes the integrated GPU.

The reason I mention this is because the new processors don't seem to respond well to high System Agent voltage. I haven't been able to do much with settings over 1.25V, but you should check with someone who's done additional experimentation to find out "when, why, and how" to use higher voltage levels.

This of course is important because of the relatively-high memory controller voltage set in some XMP profiles.


In EasyTune6 I see "QPI/Vtt Voltage" and "System Agent Voltage" both listed. I wonder how they differ?

Nick
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January 23, 2011 2:19:39 AM

nickdouglas said:
In EasyTune6 I see "QPI/Vtt Voltage" and "System Agent Voltage" both listed. I wonder how they differ?

Nick
I'm not certain. I do know that CPU VTT is something else, and that various motherboard manufacturers use different labels. That's why I refer to "Uncore" and "System Agent" rather than the labels manufacturers use.
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January 23, 2011 4:34:20 PM

Well, you guys prodded me to get to a task that's been nagging at me - digging through the documentation for the new gen! Vtt is very interesting - if you do a search through the 1156's "Intel® Core™ i7-800 and i5-700 Desktop Processor Series Datasheet - Volume 1" for Vtt, you will find around eighty or a hundred citations; in the 1155's "2nd Generation Intel® Core™ Processor Family Desktop Datasheet - Volume 1" - exactly zero!

For the 1156, the Vtt literal definition is: "L3 shared cache, memory controller, and processor I/O power rail"

Limits, per doc are:



...but, as usual, we never get a clue as to whether these limits are 'advised', or 'enforced' - a lot of the spec limits can be exceeded without problems, and sometimes with stability improvement... Another interesting aside is the infinitely fussy measurement spec - must mean something?! [:isamuelson:8]

I think, however, the most telling piece in the doc is this:



...although this is spec'd specifically for the PECI (dammit, I'm already completely spoiled by the bbcode on my forum - if I use an acronymn, I can add a 'roll-over' definition!) (Platform Environmental Control Interface), which is a comm setup to xfer thermal info, I believe it's pretty much applicable to all the off-die I/O. I've spoken to this discussing grounds, and their importance: nearly every single thing a piece of modern digital circuitry does is dependent on comparators - circuitry to determine whether a signal is high or low. The primary 'object of comparison' is the ground level, which is why proper, effective grounding is so important. The second is the termination voltage, which is the level for the high determination. For most circuitry, the term voltage is simply the supply voltage; thing is that CPUs have gotten so ungodly fast that to 'swing' the signals fast enough, and minimize leakage losses, different chunks run with different supplies. I think this is the reason raising Vtt sometimes gives more stability, especially when other voltages are 'pushed' - it gives you a bigger gap between hi and lo (histeresis - just a fancy way of saying the 'here be dragons' area where a signal is undefined) An interesting point is that this is not written in stone - in fiddling around with digital gizmos, sometimes you get improvements in speed and 'solidity' of signal detection by increasing the 'swing', sometimes by decreasing it [:fixitbil:9]

Anyhow - so far, I'm stymied in finding out what's happened to Vtt on the 1155's - but there's a crapperload to cover:
Datasheet V1 signal def's, technologies, elecspec's 110 pages
Datasheet V2 config registers defs, address mapping 290 pages
Thermal/MechSpec's 134 pages
Spec Updates 41 pages (so far!)
6 Series Chipset Datasheet 936 pages [:fixitbil:1]

In addition, Intel have released a full new set of IA32/64 instruction/system notes, which they are now kind enough to supply on a CD, along with a couple interesting whitepapers, for the asking!
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January 24, 2011 12:13:43 PM

Crashman said:
Hmm, I think you're saying Uncore and I think I'm about to say it's around 0.96 to 1.11 V for the P67 "System Agent" by default.

I agree, my original numbers were for the X58 and not the P67. I did include the 'Auto' but until I posted -- Where were your numbers?? The IMC on the P67 apparently is extremely touchy. The DRAM Voltage - 0.5v doesn't pertain to P67.

DRAM Voltage -> 1.60v~1.65v
QPI/Vtt Voltage -> Auto, or 1.1v~1.22v

Safety is in talking people to death.


Great OC Link for P67 -> http://www.overclock.net/intel-general/910467-ultimate-...
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January 24, 2011 3:58:44 PM

jaquith said:
I agree, my original numbers were for the X58 and not the P67. I did include the 'Auto' but until I posted -- Where were your numbers?? The IMC on the P67 apparently is extremely touchy. The DRAM Voltage - 0.5v doesn't pertain to P67.

DRAM Voltage -> 1.60v~1.65v
QPI/Vtt Voltage -> Auto, or 1.1v~1.22v

Safety is in talking people to death.
http://img221.imageshack.us/img221/553/processork.png

Great OC Link for P67 -> http://www.overclock.net/intel-general/910467-ultimate-...
Isn't that nice? I still don't know exactly why the memory controller voltage is more sensitive, but I still believe it's some other components on the same voltage controller that are causing that sensitivity.
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January 24, 2011 5:58:55 PM

The P67 is all about low voltage, and clearly there are good things and bad things. I get Voltage = Heat.

P67 look at the IMC plus various RAM {Speed + CAS}, it makes for 90%++ of the people very little sense to buy faster than 1333 MHz RAM -> http://www.bit-tech.net/hardware/memory/2011/01/11/the-... For a 0.7~2 FPS gain from 1333 ($43 2X2GB) -> 2133 MHz ($160 2X2GB) you'd have to b an idiot to spend 400% more for 2 FPS; buy an SSD or ANYTHING but ultra fast RAM for the P67. I get the IMC is 1333 MHz but jeez!

My major fear for the X68 is it's going to be the SOS as the P67: no BCLK OC, #1 fear -> limited PCIe meaning no gains on lanes or lane speed vs X58, IMC that sucks, and enough 'caveats' to write a book. Slapping in 8-cores with no way to utilize them is also a waste. What are you going to do with x8/x8/x8 is saturated with a 30" or triple HD monitors. The GTX 580 SLI on 2650 X 1600+ is already showing signs of saturation on x8/x8; I get the X58 is x16/x16 but 3/4-WAY that isn't the case.

BTW - I've heard the rumor mill of X68 offering PCIe 3.0, but my bet is that it won't and you'll b SOL with some PCIe 2.x variant. Also, the SATA3 limit is almost broken, excluding PCIe RevoDrives that already break SATA3 limits, so what's going to happen there -- some SATA(4) card {similar to some of the Enterprise SSDs now}??
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January 24, 2011 6:29:39 PM

If Intel follows their own historical path, the x68 will be based on one of the lower SKUs of the Xeon Patsburg, whose details have already been leaked. Like the 1156 CPU's, the 2011 moves the PCIe onto the processor for better graphics integration - will have 5 x 8 lanes, combinable/bifurcatable anyway you want - though the most common board setup will likely be the already loveable four primary slots, where you can either populate two for 2x16, or all four, for 4x8, with the remainder either on another x8 slot, or bifurcated across two fours... The lower Patsburg SKU has 4xSATA2+2XSATA3, 14xUSB2, at least eight (likely more) PCIe Gen2 on the PCH for random stuff like enet PHYs, WLAN, BlueTooth via an ExpressCard hookup, loses the QPI link to the CPU in favor of a second gen x4 DMI [the higher SKU Patsburgs will sport a x4 PCIe Gen3 link here...], and, most intersting, has a hard port for a new standard's pieces - ONFi (Open NAND Flash Interface) - integrated hybrid SATA3 HDDs, perhaps?!
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January 24, 2011 6:37:02 PM

bilbat said:
If Intel follows their own historical path, the x68 will be based on one of the lower SKUs of the Xeon Patsburg, whose details have already been leaked. Like the 1156 CPU's, the 2011 moves the PCIe onto the processor for better graphics integration - will have 5 x 8 lanes, combinable/bifurcatable anyway you want - though the most common board setup will likely be the already loveable four primary slots, where you can either populate two for 2x16, or all four, for 4x8, with the remainder either on another x8 slot, or bifurcated across two fours... The lower Patsburg SKU has 4xSATA2+2XSATA3, 14xUSB2, at least eight (likely more) PCIe Gen2 on the PCH for random stuff like enet PHYs, WLAN, BlueTooth via an ExpressCard hookup, loses the QPI link to the CPU in favor of a second gen x4 DMI [the higher SKU Patsburgs will sport a x4 PCIe Gen3 link here...], and, most intersting, has a hard port for a new standard's pieces - ONFi (Open NAND Flash Interface) - integrated hybrid SATA3 HDDs, perhaps?!
It's X78, to avoid confusion with the Z68...oops, you didn't see that...these are not the chipsets you're looking for... :p 
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January 24, 2011 6:49:23 PM

[:bilbat:9]

I dunno if I'm just getting confused easier in my advanced state of decrepitude [:bilbat:6] , or if Intel's working a lot harder at obsfucation!?!

I like Charlie Demerjian's name for the new stuff: "iCoreDSN" [Designation Signifies Nothing!]
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January 24, 2011 6:54:40 PM

Trust me, I can read the wiki versions as easy as anyone. AND hope it's wrong. AND assume {hope} that something similar to the NF200 will be added.

Sadly, yes I realize per spec both the X58 & X68 both offer 40 PCIe lanes of PCIe 2 crap again. The PROBLEM is GPUs & SSDs are leap frogging the chipsets, and unlike before it's creating a major problem. I'm not aware of 'X78' other than rumor mill but I am aware of Z68 {OC version of H67}. http://www.tweaktown.com/news/18396/lga2011_consumer_bo...

X58 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Intel_X58
X68 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Intel_X68

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January 24, 2011 7:12:07 PM

jaquith said:
Trust me, I can read the wiki versions as easy as anyone. AND hope it's wrong. AND assume {hope} that something similar to the NF200 will be added.

Sadly, yes I realize per spec both the X58 & X68 both offer 40 PCIe lanes of PCIe 2 crap again. The PROBLEM is GPUs & SSDs are leap frogging the chipsets, and unlike before it's creating a major problem. I'm not aware of 'X78' other than rumor mill but I am aware of Z68 {OC version of H67}. http://www.tweaktown.com/news/18396/lga2011_consumer_bo...

X58 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Intel_X58
X68 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Intel_X68


Well then, it's just a matter of waiting to see if the Wikipedia entry will "need to be corrected" :) 
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January 24, 2011 7:15:50 PM

Crashman said:
Well then, it's just a matter of waiting to see if the Wikipedia entry will "need to be corrected" :) 

What parts?

What's your take on the "0.7~2 FPS gain from 1333 ($43 2X2GB) -> 2133 MHz ($160 2X2GB)"?
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January 24, 2011 7:24:50 PM

I dunno about that WIKI article - the Intel systems diagram shows no QPI except the chip to chip, for NUMA and cache-snooping, which disappointed me, as I was hoping for another four-way loop, like the Tyan 7025. Hoped that Sapphire, having kidnapped EVGA's MOBO design team, would be bringing us some striking stuff - an SR-2 withouth the NF200's buggery...
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January 24, 2011 7:58:37 PM

jaquith said:
What parts?

What's your take on the "0.7~2 FPS gain from 1333 ($43 2X2GB) -> 2133 MHz ($160 2X2GB)"?
It's really all about latency, where 1600 CAS 8 has the same response time as 800 CAS 4 or 1200 CAS 6. So, I'd find a good price on 1600 CAS 8 or 1333 CAS 7 and go that rout.
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January 24, 2011 9:22:45 PM

Crashman said:
It's really all about latency, where 1600 CAS 8 has the same response time as 800 CAS 4 or 1200 CAS 6. So, I'd find a good price on 1600 CAS 8 or 1333 CAS 7 and go that rout.

On an X58 or anything that I am use to seeing before the P67 I agree, but look again at these tests. They are not what I expected. The synthetic are to me of little consequence.

http://www.bit-tech.net/hardware/memory/2011/01/11/the-...
http://www.bit-tech.net/hardware/memory/2011/01/11/the-...

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January 24, 2011 9:23:08 PM

I still just use my http://www.mediafire.com/?zgt3ujgjg4n" target="_blank">latency/value comparison tool - prices change, but the relationships remain the same...[/u]
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January 25, 2011 1:51:36 AM

nickdouglas said:
"QPI/Vtt voltage, formally known as Processor Power for I/O, is the voltage for the integrated memory controller as well as the PCI-E controller. Intel’s Default is 1.050v and Intel's Maximum is (1.05 +/- 3%) 1.080v."


Don,

After manually setting my "System Memory Multiplier (SPD)" to 16.00 and manually setting my timings to 9-9-9-24-1T, I then had to raise my "QPI/Vtt voltage" to 1.100v to remain stable and not crash in Windows. I have read that others have had to go as high as 1.200v to remain stable.

I think you should try this too.

Nick



Hi Nick,

Thanks for the tip, but at the moment I've given the motherboard back to be checked to see if it's working properly. I felt like changing my 1600MHz RAM to 1333MHz. So I can rule out the RAM for sure. This is getting too fiddly and annoying for me. I just want a PC that works without having to tweak it just to find what is the right settings.

So now, I've got to wait for 2 or 3 weeks.. yes.. weeks for the distributor to get back to the shop that I bought the motherboard from.

I put a request for them to test it and to also provide me with the the best memory and config setting (which I don't think will ever happen)

Also, the place where I bought it says they've sold the same motherboard to a few other people and haven't got a single one returned. Which I think is a silly statement from their part.

I'll keep you guys updated when I get the motherboard back.

Still no new PC and it's been almost 2 weeks :-(

Don.
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January 25, 2011 1:21:17 PM

bilbat said:
I still just use my http://www.mediafire.com/?zgt3ujgjg4n" target="_blank">latency/value comparison tool - prices change, but the relationships remain the same...
[/u]http://www.mediafire.com/?zgt3ujgjg4n 'fixing' it I saw DDR3MemCompareTool.xls

My above observations, are the very poor gains in DDR3 speeds over 1333 MHz. I've seen similar benches before on different chipsets and CPUs and typically there's some gain in FPS 1333 vs 1600 vs 1800 vs 2000+ MHz; the P67 is like hitting a wall above 1333. Strange?!" target="_blank">
I've seen you link that 'tool' before, the link is broken http://www.mediafire.com/?zgt3ujgjg4n 'fixing' it I saw DDR3MemCompareTool.xls

My above observations, are the very poor gains in DDR3 speeds over 1333 MHz. I've seen similar benches before on different chipsets and CPUs and typically there's some gain in FPS 1333 vs 1600 vs 1800 vs 2000+ MHz; the P67 is like hitting a wall above 1333. Strange?!
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January 25, 2011 1:31:44 PM

kishandb said:
...changing my 1600MHz RAM to 1333MHz. So I can rule out the RAM for sure. This is getting too fiddly and annoying for me. I just want a PC that works without having to tweak it just to find what is the right settings.

Assuming P67, then you really need to read this article - http://www.bit-tech.net/hardware/memory/2011/01/11/the-...

As far as 'tweaking', the BIOS is not going to 'magically' set your RAM to its optimum settings. The best case is that your RAM supports XMP and your MOBO properly recognizes it w/o becoming unstable or BSOD, but you still need to set the XMP in the BIOS. Building a system requires some level of going into the BIOS. Just create a post and people will walk you through the steps. Otherwise by default the BIOS assumes you installed poor quality RAM and sets the speed slow and CAS high.

Maybe 'someday' the BIOS will read your components pull settings from the cloud and ideally set the optimum values...someday.
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January 25, 2011 7:16:37 PM

jaquith said:
Otherwise by default the BIOS assumes you installed poor quality RAM and sets the speed slow and CAS high.

It actually doesn't assume anything. The SPD programming on memory tells the motherboard what speed and timings are supposed to be used at default voltage. This is where OCZ got in trouble with its "Gold" series, because the SPD programing was often wrong. SPD should always work without setting anything manually, but those "stable 1.5V settigs" result in the reduced speed and high CAS you mentioned.

XMP will always be "extended", so you'll always need to pick an XMP profile manually.

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January 25, 2011 7:40:02 PM

Crashman said:
It actually doesn't assume anything. The SPD programming on memory tells the motherboard what speed and timings are supposed to be used at default voltage. This is where OCZ got in trouble with its "Gold" series, because the SPD programing was often wrong. SPD should always work without setting anything manually, but those "stable 1.5V settigs" result in the reduced speed and high CAS you mentioned.

XMP will always be "extended", so you'll always need to pick an XMP profile manually.

My 'real' point being if you slap-in say 1600 MHz 8-8-8-24 @ 1.65v RAM -> I have NEVER seen poof -> 1600 MHz 8-8-8-24 @ 1.65v in the BIOS -- ever - ever never. Instead more like 1066 MHz 9-9-9-2X @ 1.50v even using QVL + XMP RAM. Meaning the Speed, CAS, Voltage are at basic JEDEC settings. Heck I've seen XMP RAM + BIOS -> XMP = BSOD a rig plenty of times on Intel. Namely GA.
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