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P67A-UD3 reset reboot

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January 17, 2011 9:55:33 AM

Hello everyone, just bought a P67A-UD3 board and i5-2300
not yet any overclocking has been done with the system

It is strange that if I press the reset button, the system will reboot but power off during the progress, the power off will last for around 2 second, then system will power on again and finish the reboot progress loading the windows

does anyone have the same problem? the BIOS version is F4

More about : p67a ud3 reset reboot

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a b K Overclocking
a c 124 V Motherboard
January 17, 2011 12:48:58 PM

I have seen this on several of Intels chipsets. I first saw this with a 975X board, it was later fixed with a bios update.

If I disconnect the power to my X58 system, it does something similar on its first cold boot.

I think i have got that on reset sometimes as well. I do not use reset much as I do not have that button on my current case.
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a c 177 V Motherboard
January 17, 2011 6:45:52 PM

This is often cured by doing the (obligatory) "Load Optimized Defaults" from the BIOS' main page, followed by an (also obligatory) <F10> "Save, exit, and reboot"...

I've mentioned the 'sequencing' of drivers here before - the best way to plop in your board's drivers is to run the driver installer on the included disk, even if it's an older board, and newer drivers are available on the GB web-site. Before anything else can go on, the chipset drivers must be installed, as the system can't install anything else 'hung off' the, say, PCIe bus until it 'knows' it has a PCIe bus! Thus, if one isn't aware of the requisite sequence of installation, you'll just get strange error messages when you get a driver installer 'out of order'... Also, depending on the OS, the system may need to do a reboot here and there as it installs drivers, so that after the reboot, it can, say, query the PCIe to find a USB to install. You'll notice that 7 is better at this than Xp, requiring fewer boots, as 7 drivers can, in some cases, install and run, allowing the next driver in the sequence to have a go at it, rather than reboot to load that PCIe driver first...

Booting is somewhat the same situation. When a processor & BIOS starts up, the first thing the CPU does is pass the BIOS its ID string, so the BIOS can make a few basic settings based on the CPU type. Then the system starts polling busses - asking, in effect, what are you and what are you connected to? This is one of the differences between a "cold boot" (either at first power up, or in response to a 'hard [that is, hardware initiated] reset'), and a "warm boot", typically after or in response to an 'orderly restart' request... Before the "Load Opt" is done, the system is starting from scratch each time, with totally unknown hardware. Some of these things also need to be sequenced at start. When the board is not intialized by the LoadOpt, it starts up at the slowest clock setup that any processor of its socket type can require, then gets the CPU_ID string, stores it, and restarts at the clock speed (Bclk and multiplier) the BIOS' table of CPUs tells it to use for your particular CPU. Once you've done the LoadOpt, the system starts out with a big advantage - it has stored a bunch of info about 'what it's got', and can fire itself up more expediciously...

This is also what your 'Quick Boot' feature in the BIOS does. Even when the CMOS has a table of 'who's hooked up to what', at startup, the system still verifies what the table contains by actually 'hitting the bus', and enumerating the part it expects to find there. When Quick Boot is enabled, the system skips the whole 'query and confirm' thing, and simply believes what you've told it, and runs with those assumptions - whether the hardware matches or not!
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January 18, 2011 12:19:54 AM

bilbat said:
This is often cured by doing the (obligatory) "Load Optimized Defaults" from the BIOS' main page, followed by an (also obligatory) <F10> "Save, exit, and reboot"...

I've mentioned the 'sequencing' of drivers here before - the best way to plop in your board's drivers is to run the driver installer on the included disk, even if it's an older board, and newer drivers are available on the GB web-site. Before anything else can go on, the chipset drivers must be installed, as the system can't install anything else 'hung off' the, say, PCIe bus ..........


err.... thanks for your information. Anyway, this is not my first computer and i think i got "experience" to judge the weird boot, so that's not exactly can be explained through the points that you listed
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January 20, 2011 12:38:29 AM

Update your BIOS first. And on which time instance did you press the reset button?
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January 20, 2011 7:09:19 AM

I've updated to newest version already....

I have try both the time that i press reset button: within windows environment and during the msg "boot from CD/DVD" stage
both of them cause the same results
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a c 177 V Motherboard
January 20, 2011 1:34:37 PM

I want to apologize here... I, when I try to help here, typically over-explain everything. This is not an attempt to belittle anyone's specific knowledge level - it's simply because, in addition to the OP, lots of people will read these posts (we're three days later now, and 182 folks have read this...), and the computer press, in general, does a terrible job of covering basics. Like press in any specific genre (say, car mags like Motor Trend and Hot Rod), they mostly exist to 'cheer-lead' for their advertisers. I often recount the story about my canceling my subsription to PC Magazine - I used to read them, as they were one of the few who did substantial coverage of real-world use of hardware. At some point, their editorial policy changed. This was back in the days when HD space was limited, and slow enough so that doing LZW compression in hardware was worthwhile, and a number of drive controllers popped up that did this. PCM reviewed one that they were never able to get working, although they tried it in several systems, and had access to a level of support no mere customer could ever hope to match - and they gave it an eight (of ten) rating, based, apparently, on the performance claims PRINTED ON THE BOX! (BTW - my favorite car mag is Car & Driver - they aren't quite as rowdy as they used to be, but I've seen 'em send a car back to the manufacturer, saying they didn't feel it was safe enough to actually drive in traffic - figured a wheel or a suspension arm was likely tro drop off!)

So, my post could have been condensed to "Have you done a LoadOpt from the BIOS? No - do so... Yes - we have a new anomally!"
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January 20, 2011 2:37:09 PM

thanks bilbat

don't be serious though :) 

anyway, i have try both "load opt" and "load safe" in BIOS already, but there still having same answer~
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a c 197 K Overclocking
a c 156 V Motherboard
January 21, 2011 11:39:46 AM

You could have a "glitchy" power supply. What kind of PSU?

Speaking of car magazines, in the '70's, I liked Road and Track. They used to have a sense of humor. They tested, among other things, a Mercedes Benz dump truck, a Greyhound bus, a gas powered pogo stick, an M48A3 tank (very poor gas mileage, very limited color options), and my favorite - a dog (the ten teat model as opposed to the "more highly tuned pursuit model" (male).

At the time, C & D was pretty stuffy.
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January 31, 2011 12:21:57 PM

Best answer selected by dellguyz.
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