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ASUS P8P67 / Pro question re: USB 3.0 front port

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January 18, 2011 4:17:43 PM

I'm focusing on either the P8P67 Pro or the Regular, or the ASRock Extreme 4.

A little hesitant on Asus because it seems there have been some startup glitches, but I know there are lots of people with working boards now so its not insurmountable.

1) Trying to decide whether ASUS perceived quality, 3yr warranty and potential that they'll follow along with Bios updates over the years is better than with ASRock (and worth the price differential).

2) Also the ASRock comes with the USB 3.0 front port adapter, which the ASUS doesnt (unless you buy the Deluxe). My question is for those who have the ASUS, do all the P8P67s have the SOCKET for that front port adapter, such that in the future I could theoretically pay $10 and buy one? (I assume they're a universal design). Right now I don't place a huge amount of value on the front USB 3.0 --- if I get a drive dock at some point it can always be hooked in back. What will one use a USB 3.0 for? Flash card readers? Do SD cards currently transfer at a rate which saturates USB 2.0? I don't know but hopefully you do. At this point I might not even install the bracket on my case if I got the ASRock, as my case already has front USB 2.0 ports and I'd just be adding a bay with 2 more slots for no reason. But I'm trying to figure out how much I should be valuing the "free" adapter you get with the ASRock vs not getting it with the ASUS.

Any opinions on either or both of the above are appreciated. I'm sure some of you have done similar thinking as you've been buying your mobos.

a c 78 V Motherboard
a b Ĉ ASUS
January 18, 2011 4:37:41 PM

Buy the P8P67 Deluxe version; the top end boards will have longer BIOS support than mid-range/low-end boards, but it will not be anywhere close to three years, you'll be lucky if it is 12 months. When you look at the CPU changes, chipset changes, etc., 12 months of updated BIOSes is a long time. BIOS updates are usually to fix a problem or add support for new hardware or hardware capabilities. ASUS has a longer, better history in board support than ASRock
a b V Motherboard
January 18, 2011 4:38:08 PM

hogan773 said:
I'm focusing on either the P8P67 Pro or the Regular, or the ASRock Extreme 4.

A little hesitant on Asus because it seems there have been some startup glitches, but I know there are lots of people with working boards now so its not insurmountable.

1) Trying to decide whether ASUS perceived quality, 3yr warranty and potential that they'll follow along with Bios updates over the years is better than with ASRock (and worth the price differential).

2) Also the ASRock comes with the USB 3.0 front port adapter, which the ASUS doesnt (unless you buy the Deluxe). My question is for those who have the ASUS, do all the P8P67s have the SOCKET for that front port adapter, such that in the future I could theoretically pay $10 and buy one? (I assume they're a universal design). Right now I don't place a huge amount of value on the front USB 3.0 --- if I get a drive dock at some point it can always be hooked in back. What will one use a USB 3.0 for? Flash card readers? Do SD cards currently transfer at a rate which saturates USB 2.0? I don't know but hopefully you do. At this point I might not even install the bracket on my case if I got the ASRock, as my case already has front USB 2.0 ports and I'd just be adding a bay with 2 more slots for no reason. But I'm trying to figure out how much I should be valuing the "free" adapter you get with the ASRock vs not getting it with the ASUS.

Any opinions on either or both of the above are appreciated. I'm sure some of you have done similar thinking as you've been buying your mobos.


Don't be hesitant. I understand your concern but remember ASUS sells the most and was quick out of the starting gate so you'll see more comments about them than anyone else...it is a question of numbers. The glitches were minor and most were user error. My Pro is working great and I think it is a awesome mobo.

1. ASUS is good quality stuff and has solid support and a long 3 yr warranty. If you are concerned, you can always buy over the counter return coverage for a nominal cost at many dealers (mine offered it...2yr over the counter was $29).

2. The Asus ATX boards all have the USB v3.0 hookup near the SATA ports on the mobo. The deluxe comes with the header, the Pro does not. If one ever wants to buy one, they can be had, price unknown to me. The mobo USB connection can be used to connect to an existing USB v3.0 header connection from the case or you can plug in the ASUS add-on header as mentioned.

Hope this helps.

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January 18, 2011 5:36:13 PM

treefrog07 said:
Buy the P8P67 Deluxe version; the top end boards will have longer BIOS support than mid-range/low-end boards, but it will not be anywhere close to three years, you'll be lucky if it is 12 months. When you look at the CPU changes, chipset changes, etc., 12 months of updated BIOSes is a long time. BIOS updates are usually to fix a problem or add support for new hardware or hardware capabilities. ASUS has a longer, better history in board support than ASRock


So you think ASUS will support BIOS for its $225 board for longer than for its $190 or $150 boards, even though there will undoubtedly be many more of the latter out in the installed base of customers? That sounds odd.
January 18, 2011 9:59:27 PM

Eagle Eye_54 said:


2. The Asus ATX boards all have the USB v3.0 hookup near the SATA ports on the mobo. The deluxe comes with the header, the Pro does not. If one ever wants to buy one, they can be had, price unknown to me. The mobo USB connection can be used to connect to an existing USB v3.0 header connection from the case or you can plug in the ASUS add-on header as mentioned.

Hope this helps.



Thanks.......any insight to the second part of my question re: USB 3.0. More specifically what will one actually USE it for? Do current SDHC cards have a transfer rate that is faster than USB 2.0 allows? Will this allow a mechanical HDD dock to xfer faster than it can with eSata today? Or is it just for the more distant future where one would use an SSD as a backup USB drive and want more speed than current eSata allows?

Just trying to figure out if I'm actually going to be plugging anything INTO those awesome USB 3.0 ports that I'm worried about getting (or not). If no, then I care less (much less) about getting a dock that can sit on my shelf.
a b V Motherboard
January 18, 2011 10:55:34 PM

hogan773 said:
Thanks.......any insight to the second part of my question re: USB 3.0. More specifically what will one actually USE it for? Do current SDHC cards have a transfer rate that is faster than USB 2.0 allows? Will this allow a mechanical HDD dock to xfer faster than it can with eSata today? Or is it just for the more distant future where one would use an SSD as a backup USB drive and want more speed than current eSata allows?

Just trying to figure out if I'm actually going to be plugging anything INTO those awesome USB 3.0 ports that I'm worried about getting (or not). If no, then I care less (much less) about getting a dock that can sit on my shelf.


First of all, remember that the boards do have USB v3.0 hookups on the back for things like printers, keyboards, mice, etc. Down the road, you might use a front access connection for camera hookups, backup drives and so on. If you buy or are planning to buy a new case, you might want to ensure it has USB v3.0 already on the front panel...some do. Add-on parts like the ASUS plug in part that comes with the deluxe is just that, an add-on. Something I'd avoid for cosmetic reasons, lack of free 5.25 drive space, etc.

I cannot comment of the bandwidth questions you asked, that is something for a pro to respond to. Remember that these new boards have eSATA hookups, as well as USB v3.0. So you should have all the bases covered for the foreseeable future. I replace boards every 2 or 3 years anyway so long term hookup issues are not something I worry about. If you are really agonizing about it, spend the extra $40 and buy the deluxe.


Hope this helps to some degree.
January 19, 2011 1:25:09 AM

Eagle Eye_54 said:
First of all, remember that the boards do have USB v3.0 hookups on the back for things like printers, keyboards, mice, etc. Down the road, you might use a front access connection for camera hookups, backup drives and so on. If you buy or are planning to buy a new case, you might want to ensure it has USB v3.0 already on the front panel...some do. Add-on parts like the ASUS plug in part that comes with the deluxe is just that, an add-on. Something I'd avoid for cosmetic reasons, lack of free 5.25 drive space, etc.

I cannot comment of the bandwidth questions you asked, that is something for a pro to respond to. Remember that these new boards have eSATA hookups, as well as USB v3.0. So you should have all the bases covered for the foreseeable future. I replace boards every 2 or 3 years anyway long term hookup issues are not something I worry about. If you are really angonizing about it, spend the extra $40 and buy the deluxe.


Hope this helps to some degree.


Yeah thanks - so basically there isn't a whole lot of need for USB 3.0 right now........(I realize there are ports in the back, but keyboards and mice don't need extra 3.0 bandwidth and speed!) The little front port is just a way they can differentiate the Deluxe from the Pro I guess. I'm not gonna pay up for that one feature. As you said, unless there is a need for front USB3 I prob won't even install the bracket as it just clutters the look of the case.
a b V Motherboard
January 19, 2011 2:02:42 AM

Yes, I know the mice and keyboards don't need USB v3.0 now but we don't know what is on the drawing boards for the future. I should have said external drives, complex printer/scanners and so on. Obviously there will be add-ons that use it....it always works that way with technology.

I should add that the P8P67 Deluxe does have a few more extras in it besides the USB hub. You should do a comparison on the ASUS web site to see the minor issues. There was nothing extra that it offered that I wanted so I bought the Pro. No regrets. It is a nice board and the i5-2500K works great with it. The bonus is the price is right.
a b V Motherboard
January 19, 2011 9:20:32 AM

OK I just bought my Asus P8P67 Pro motherboard. I also got myself the Intel Core i5 2500K CPU, and a set of OCZ Reaper 2 x 2GB DDR3 RAM chips @ 2000MHz.

Now I've noticed some funny ports and plugs and slots on the mainboard, and I want to know if my PSU, a Gigabyte ODIN 720W would be able to easily support this board. Would it not need any funny extra power plugs and stuff? I saw something about extra CPU power plugs and things, and now I'm starting to worry that my PSU might not be up to spec.

Can anybody help me with some extra info on this? I don't want to buy a new PSU as well, I'm broke after the purchase of all these new parts now!
a b V Motherboard
January 19, 2011 2:13:03 PM

Toxxyc said:
OK I just bought my Asus P8P67 Pro motherboard. I also got myself the Intel Core i5 2500K CPU, and a set of OCZ Reaper 2 x 2GB DDR3 RAM chips @ 2000MHz.

Now I've noticed some funny ports and plugs and slots on the mainboard, and I want to know if my PSU, a Gigabyte ODIN 720W would be able to easily support this board. Would it not need any funny extra power plugs and stuff? I saw something about extra CPU power plugs and things, and now I'm starting to worry that my PSU might not be up to spec.

Can anybody help me with some extra info on this? I don't want to buy a new PSU as well, I'm broke after the purchase of all these new parts now!


Your 720w PSU should be fine assuming it isn't too old (they loose their output power about 5-10% per year). Which funny ports and plugs are you referring to? Check on page 2-2 of your owners' manual and you'll see a diagram of the various hook-ups.

As for power hook-up, this motherboard uses standard ATX connectors,a 24 pin EATXPWR and an 8 pin EATX12V). Your PSU should have those cables on it. Depending on which video card you are operating, you may also need additional power connection for it (PCI-Express has a limit of 75 watts available for the video card and most newer GPU's need more, up to 300w and beyond). These are either 6-pin or 8 pin connectors and again, most PSU's will have these.

The rest of the connectors and hookups are for such things as USB v2 & v3 headers, eSATA headers, audio headers, fan headers, various sized PCI slots, SATA connection points (for optical and hard drives), front panel headers and so on. There is nothing unusual in this except that now they have SATA III and USB v3.0 headers.

One thing I did notice in your post was the mention of 2000 Mhz RAM. While it looks to be on the QVL, that speed RAM has been causing some issues with the new boards/CPU's. It is too late to return it? I would suggest either 1333 MHz or 1600 Mhz RAM, preferably ones that are both on the QVL and run at 1.5v rather than 1.65v. It should also be cheaper to buy thus saving you money. There is no performance benefit to 2000 Mhz RAM with this setup since the CPU will run it at 1600 Mhz by default.

Hope this helps.
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