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Question about dual channel memory and P67 board

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January 19, 2011 8:57:26 PM

Got a couple questions about dual channel memory and P67 boards (specifically the P8P67 pro board) that I just recently got. I read some comments about the hardware and noticed some people saying that the new cpu 1155's worked better with 1.5v memory rather than higher voltage ram. I know how to build a computer but my understandings of ram are limited.

So first things first.

I bought this ram to go with my P8P67 pro and i7-2600k
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

(corsair vengeance 1.5v 9-9-9-24 2x4g sticks dual channel memory with high overclock potential) For those that do not want to click the link.

here is a picture of the board in detail

http://www.newegg.com/Product/ImageGallery.aspx?CurImag...

First question, Was going with this corsair vengeance 1.5v ram a better choice than going with corsairs xms3 1.6v ram? Because I noticed that the XMS3 says 1.5-1.6 volts however it has the same specs and is exactly the same price. What's the difference between the two? Did I mess up?

Also...

For best dual channel, I want to stick these sticks in ram slots A_1 and A_2 for the dual channel right?

Or is it A_1 and B_1 slots ???

Just asking because normally I would have put it into A_1 and A_2 however i noticed in the picture on this vengeance ram that they have is separated into A_1 and B_1 on the cover. Just wondering if that was a cosmetic choice to make the picture look better or if I'm not understanding something here on what I'm doing.
January 19, 2011 9:03:15 PM

I've never heard of different voltage of RAMs being more or less than others. Sounds like rubbish to me.
And to your second question, it's 1-A and 1-B.
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January 19, 2011 9:10:51 PM

yeah I duno but some people were saying 1.5v works better with the sandybridge chips over 1.6 or higher voltage ram.
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January 19, 2011 11:24:21 PM

Sandy was designed for 1.5v RAM. That is why you are seeing a WHOLE bunch of new memory series being released right now.
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January 19, 2011 11:43:44 PM

Ah I see. I feel much better now that I got 1.5v ram then.


Just to be clear for 2 sticks of dual channel 4g ram I will need to insert them into a_1 and B_1 slots correct?
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January 20, 2011 12:26:52 AM

Shelledfade said:
Ah I see. I feel much better now that I got 1.5v ram then.


Just to be clear for 2 sticks of dual channel 4g ram I will need to insert them into a_1 and B_1 slots correct?


You did good buying the 1.5v RAM. That should be perfect for your needs.

As per page 2-5 in the P8P67 Pro manual, you need to put a two stick RAM set in Dimm sockets A-2 and B-2. This helps provide for a more stable system. Most people would tend to put them in A-1 and A-2 or A-1 and B-1. It may work but is not recommended by ASUS.

Hope this helps you and enjoy that new setup....the Sandy is a superb platform!
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January 20, 2011 9:08:20 AM

Best answer selected by Shelledfade.
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January 20, 2011 9:35:40 PM

Calling Ram "Dual Channel" is a misnomer.

Quote:
Dual-channel architecture is a technology implemented on motherboards by the motherboard manufacturer and does not apply to memory modules. Theoretically any matched pair of memory modules may be used in either single- or dual-channel operation, provided the motherboard supports this architecture.

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January 20, 2011 11:46:22 PM

anort3 said:
Sandy was designed for 1.5v RAM. That is why you are seeing a WHOLE bunch of new memory series being released right now.
I believe someone is blowing smoke at you. Previous generation (LGA-1156) processors were also designed for 1.5v RAM as well. I don't think the memory controller has been significantly changed, and Intel has recommended "no more than 1.65V" all along.

You're going to see a bunch of Previous Generation modules relabled for LGA-1155. I already discusssed this with several memory brands, so I know it's true. You're also going to see the elimination of XMP profiles that require BCLK overclocking, since Sandy Bridge doesn't deal with it very well, but that's only going to affect oddball RAM like DDR3-2000.
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January 20, 2011 11:59:56 PM

Crashman said:
I believe someone is blowing smoke at you. Previous generation (LGA-1156) processors were also designed for 1.5v RAM as well. I don't think the memory controller has been significantly changed, and Intel has recommended "no more than 1.65V" all along.



Think what you like. Just read some other forums (like overclockers) and you'll get the picture. My dealer has had to RMA dozens of 1.65v RAM dimms that were in Snady mobos over the past week. Intel recommends 1.5v but the mobo makers say it is safe with 1.65v. So much for blowing smoke.
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January 21, 2011 12:31:57 AM

Eagle Eye_54 said:
Think what you like. Just read some other forums (like overclockers) and you'll get the picture. My dealer has had to RMA dozens of 1.65v RAM dimms that were in Snady mobos over the past week. Intel recommends 1.5v but the mobo makers say it is safe with 1.65v. So much for blowing smoke.
Yes, RMA'ing defective memory and returning memory because someone doesn't know what slots to put it in or how to set it to recommended values has always been a problem, and always will be.

Just so you know, I'm using the "old stuff" exclusively in my LGA-1155 builds, with nary a problem.
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January 21, 2011 12:41:29 AM

There is no doubt that user error is a big contributor to Sandy Bridge issues this past week. I had a few of those myself but they were minor and quickly fixed. I too am using old stuff I guess...1333Mhz ValueRam is hardly leading edge! But there are issues considered serious out there. As I am sure you know, there are major differences in the architecture of these cpu's and they have not been 100% problem free. The issues are now well know to insiders and they are being dealt with. Such things as use 1.5v RAM, do not use BCLK to OC, etc etc. They have all been talked about here and likely on every other forum out there.
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January 21, 2011 12:59:51 AM

Eagle Eye_54 said:
There is no doubt that user error is a big contributor to Sandy Bridge issues this past week. I had a few of those myself but they were minor and quickly fixed. I too am using old stuff I guess...1333Mhz ValueRam is hardly leading edge! But there are issues considered serious out there. As I am sure you know, there are major differences in the architecture of these cpu's and they have not been 100% problem free. The issues are now well know to insiders and they are being dealt with. Such things as use 1.5v RAM, do not use BCLK to OC, etc etc. They have all been talked about here and likely on every other forum out there.
I should probably drop the dramatic generalizations and get more specific...

Most of the P67 memory is unchanged from P55 memory, because most of it fell within the strictest of P55's rules. Then again, "most" just means "more than half".

On the other hand, there were also some modules that required significant increases in "uncore" voltage. Because the "uncore" side now contains additional components, voltage changes would have a more profound impact even if the memory controller itself was completely unchanged. Such modules may need their XMP registers reprogrammed to work at lower "uncore" voltage, which could eliminate their top settings in some cases. Likewise, XMP registers such as 1800, 2000, and 2200 are now invalid since the BCLK cannot be significantly altered.

Now, the XMP stuff has no bearing on SPD, so a "properly programmed" old module will work in the new boards. As for XMP itself, most builders don't even know how to use it.

So what we're left with is this: Most of the new modules are unchanged except for the label on the box (the model number). Of the remaining modules, most will have old hardware but altered XMP values. There is very little new hardware, and P55 modules that don't work on P67 when using "SPD" programming weren't programed properly in the first place.
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January 21, 2011 1:29:19 AM

Crashman said:
I believe someone is blowing smoke at you. Previous generation (LGA-1156) processors were also designed for 1.5v RAM as well. I don't think the memory controller has been significantly changed, and Intel has recommended "no more than 1.65V" all along.

You're going to see a bunch of Previous Generation modules relabled for LGA-1155. I already discusssed this with several memory brands, so I know it's true. You're also going to see the elimination of XMP profiles that require BCLK overclocking, since Sandy Bridge doesn't deal with it very well, but that's only going to affect oddball RAM like DDR3-2000.



Thanks for the heads up Crashman. I should have my Sandy build in the next week or so and I just assumed with all the new 1.5v memory I keep seeing pop up that the memory controller had been changed somehow.
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January 21, 2011 1:38:52 AM

Thanks for the detailed explanation Crashman...it is starting to add up! :) 
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February 23, 2012 6:59:27 PM

This topic has been closed by Mousemonkey
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