Question about RAID 0

Hello all

The Alienware Aurora ALX has an option that choosing 2 HDDs RAID 0.

I want to use my own two 2.5" SSDs and make them RAID 0.

As we know, one 2.5" to 3.5" converter can contain two 2.5" SSDs.

If I want to make RAID 0 for the 2 SSDs, should I place 2 SSDs into one converter or should I buy 2 converters and place one SSD into each converter?

thanks in advance
12 answers Last reply
More about question raid
  1. Seeing as the SSDs don't move, and produce little heat as far as I know (might be wrong), I would suppose that putting two into one converter would work fine, otherwise it would be pointless.

    Just make sure that the motherboard that the Aurora ALX has supports RAID options, and especially 0.
  2. Lmeow said:
    Seeing as the SSDs don't move, and produce little heat as far as I know (might be wrong), I would suppose that putting two into one converter would work fine, otherwise it would be pointless.

    Just make sure that the motherboard that the Aurora ALX has supports RAID options, and especially 0.


    thanks for reply
    of course AW Aurora ALX supports raid 0.
    0\1\5\10 all are ok
  3. Then you'll be all set.
  4. Lmeow said:
    Then you'll be all set.


    No I am not..

    i give u an example:

    the 4-port USB hub

    1 usb port of a computer can provide speed of 480Mbps(max)

    then you insert the hub into a usb port

    then 1 usb port becomes 4 ports

    do you think each of the 4 ports still have 480Mbps ?

    No. total is 480.

    same situation of mine.

    If i place 2 SSDs into one converter, what will happen?
  5. What do you mean? SATA II provides around 300 MB/s bandwidth which provides far more than enough bandwidth for two 40 GB SSDs in RAID 0. Are you talking about a physical converter where you put two SSDs into one 3.5" converter which uses one connection to the motherboard? I wouldn't know how you'd put two SSDs in RAID 0 using one SATA cable. Each SSD should be connected to their own SATA II port.

    If you're referring to a specific converter, could you link me to the product?
  6. That is not a very good analogy. If you are talking about a physical convertor that allows you to mount a 2.5 drive into a 3.5 bay then that will have no bearing on potential performance. The example you have provided involves a sub system of the computer that involves several critical elements.

    I have read but have not tested that people are taking the gold mounts that screw into the case for the motherboard to bolt on to and screwing 4 of these into the 2.5 drive. Apparently this provides the extra inch required to fit a 3.5 inch bay. Simply insert screws into the mounts and the 2.5 is in place without need of a convertor. I have not tested this though. Maybe someone could confer?
  7. As Lmeow has said the drives need a dedicated SATA Port so I am assuming that in my earlier post.
  8. Lmeow said:
    What do you mean? SATA II provides around 300 MB/s bandwidth which provides far more than enough bandwidth for two 40 GB SSDs in RAID 0. Are you talking about a physical converter where you put two SSDs into one 3.5" converter which uses one connection to the motherboard? I wouldn't know how you'd put two SSDs in RAID 0 using one SATA cable. Each SSD should be connected to their own SATA II port.

    If you're referring to a specific converter, could you link me to the product?


    Thanks again for reply.

    Firstly, I don't think "SATA II provides around 300 MB/s bandwidth which provides far more than enough bandwidth for two 40 GB SSDs in RAID 0".
    Two of my SSDs are Intel x25-E 32GB.
    If RAID 0, they will reach the speed of Read 480M/s and Write 400M/s which are much faster than 300M/s you mentioned.

    Secondly, I don't know if my opinion is correct or not: see below

    You mentioned the SATA cable which reminds me a lot ... oops...someone looking for me,
  9. Lmeow said:
    What do you mean? SATA II provides around 300 MB/s bandwidth which provides far more than enough bandwidth for two 40 GB SSDs in RAID 0. Are you talking about a physical converter where you put two SSDs into one 3.5" converter which uses one connection to the motherboard? I wouldn't know how you'd put two SSDs in RAID 0 using one SATA cable. Each SSD should be connected to their own SATA II port.

    If you're referring to a specific converter, could you link me to the product?

    see
    http://www.thermaltakeusa.com/Product.aspx?C=1403&ID=1826
  10. Wamphryi said:
    That is not a very good analogy. If you are talking about a physical convertor that allows you to mount a 2.5 drive into a 3.5 bay then that will have no bearing on potential performance. The example you have provided involves a sub system of the computer that involves several critical elements.

    I have read but have not tested that people are taking the gold mounts that screw into the case for the motherboard to bolt on to and screwing 4 of these into the 2.5 drive. Apparently this provides the extra inch required to fit a 3.5 inch bay. Simply insert screws into the mounts and the 2.5 is in place without need of a convertor. I have not tested this though. Maybe someone could confer?

    yep i'm talking about a physical coonverter
  11. Well I checked out the image that shows the rear of the device and it shows two individual power and SATA connectors to attach to the motherboard. Obviously both drives will plug in individually so there is no real bottleneck that I can see. It simply allows for two drives to sit in one hotswappable bay but they have their own connectors. I cant see how there could be a bottleneck.
  12. In RAID 0, Intel X25-Es do not necessarily double the read and write speeds, also the speeds you listed are probably the maximum which will rarely be reached. Lastly, you have forgotten that each drive receives it's own connection, so that the it splits to (in your theoretical situation) 240 MB/s and 200 MB/s EACH drive, less than 300 MB/s. On Intel's website, sustained sequential read is up to 250 MB/s while sustained sequential write is up to 170 MB/s so you'll be fine. The physical converter uses individual connections as Wamphryi said, so there should be no concerns whatsoever.
Ask a new question

Read More

NAS / RAID Converter SSD Components