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Replacement/Comparable Upgrade of Q6600 with 6GB RAM

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  • Office
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May 9, 2010 4:51:04 AM

Hello,

One of my clients is presently using a Gateway DX4710 Desktop with the following specs:
Intel Core 2 Quad Q6600, 6GB DDR2, 640GB HDD.

I think this system (or any quad-core system) may not be right system for an office using typical office productivity software (Office 2003), browsing, occasional Adobe Acrobat PDF creation, CD/DVD burning, and other related applications.

This system however, is being used by the owner of a growing company on a Windows Server 2003-based network.

My question is what would be a worth replacement to upgrade this machine?

Does the following make sense?
Core i5 750 with a RAID-capable motherboard and 6GB RAM?
How much of a difference would a SATA3 drive make for this kind of office work?

Please share feedback or give me some other ideas.

Thanks,
Ram

More about : replacement comparable upgrade q6600 6gb ram

May 9, 2010 5:04:02 AM

You may need to fill out the build advice form in my signature. To answer your questions, whether you upgrade or not depends on your budget. You won't want 6GB with anything but a 1366 socket. There won't be much benefit to a SATA 6Gb/s mechanical drive.
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May 9, 2010 5:04:29 AM

according to anantech's benchmark comparison tool, it pretty much takes a Phenom-II/955(BE) x4core to edge out your old proc, in *every* category (at stock clock) ...

... I would guess that a moderately overclocked x3core would be roughly equal to Q6600.

A 965 at standard clock with retail cooler and a $100 mobo and $100 ram kit will give you a bump you can feel. ... all totalled ~$380 for cpu/ram/mobo/stock-cooler

lookie :

http://www.anandtech.com/bench/Product/53?vs=88


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May 9, 2010 5:35:20 AM

Thanks for such prompt replies. I don't know if it has to out-clock the current Q6600 CPU, the question is if upgrading, replacing for an Office PC, what would be the best (Intel) solution? I don't think it has to be Quad-core, but based on office-work requirements for the Owner, would an i3 530/i5 750 be a worth replacement? Is that too much?


APPROXIMATE PURCHASE DATE: This week BUDGET RANGE: -$1000, if possible

SYSTEM USAGE FROM MOST TO LEAST IMPORTANT: Office applications/Word Processing, Excel, Outlook 2003, browsing

PARTS NOT REQUIRED: Replacing only the system, keeping existing 23/24" LCDs (x2 in mirror mode), speakers, keyboard, etc. Currently has Microsoft Business License of Windows XP Pro x32.

PREFERRED WEBSITE(S) FOR PARTS: www.canadacomputers.com, www.newegg.ca COUNTRY OF ORIGIN: Canada

PARTS PREFERENCES: I typically use Intel CPU's and ASUS boards but may consider others.

OVERCLOCKING: No - SLI OR CROSSFIRE: No

MONITOR RESOLUTION: Currently using two 23" & 24" LCD's although I'm unsure of the resolution, possibly 1920x1200

ADDITIONAL COMMENTS: Needs to be dual-monitor capable. Some of the Asus boards that I use/have used are dual-monitor capable with DVI/VGA/HDMI outputs. Can I manage with on-board graphics or would dedicated be a lot better?

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May 9, 2010 5:37:25 AM


750 is WAY overkill ... also does NOT have integrated graphics (which are really good on the 1156 platform.
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May 9, 2010 5:41:09 AM

^ Yeah, if it's just for Office then an upgrade isn't really all that necessary.
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Best solution

May 9, 2010 5:49:46 AM

Yep ... after reviewing the benchmark comparisons, I would choose the i3-540 (not 530) as a fully commensurate CPU (to the Q6600)

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

4GB RAM Kit (DDR3x2ch) will run ~$105

mobo will run just shy of $200

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May 9, 2010 5:58:53 AM

Alvin Smith said:
Yep ... after reviewing the benchmark comparisons, I would choose the i3-540 (not 530) as a fully commensurate CPU (to the Q6600)

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

4GB RAM Kit (DDR3x2ch) will run ~$105

mobo will run just shy of $200



Thanks so much I've built a couple of i3 530's and been happy with performance. Benchmarks between Q6600 and i3 530 look good, but I'll go with the 540 if available.

He's got a license for Windows XP Pro 32-bit. Would it be worth the money to go to 64-bit? Would the difference be noticable? What other bottlenecks should I consider? WD Caviar Blue/Black hard drives?
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May 9, 2010 6:08:10 AM

Let them have a Samsung SpinPoint F3 1TB for only $75 ...

... Or a Seagate 7200.12 500GB for ~$55

Both are rock solid ...

Personally ... this would be a great opportunity to go with a Kingston 64GB SSD for ~$140 ...

... As a Boot-System drive ... it provides RELIABILITY AND CRASH TOLERANCE to the small business and NOW would be the best time to introduce, to new builds.

... When SSDs DO fail ... it is a very gradual process ... allowing months of readable backup opportunities.

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May 9, 2010 6:12:44 AM

Alvin Smith said:
Let them have a Samsung SpinPoint F3 1TB for only $75 ...

... Or a Seagate 7200.12 500GB for ~$55

Both are rock solid ...

Personally ... this would be a great opportunity to go with a Kingston 64GB SSD for ~$140 ...

... As a Boot-System drive ... it provides RELIABILITY AND CRASH TOLERANCE to the small business and NOW would be the best time to introduce, to new builds.

... When SSDs DO fail ... it is a very gradual process ... allowing months of readable backup opportunities.


I used a fair amount of Seagate (.11)'s before the issue of firmware was known. Fortunately I didn't have any issues, but I've shifted away from Seagate after that reason, dealing mostly with WD.

Is it worthwhile suggesting RAID1?
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May 9, 2010 6:21:01 AM

RAID1 ??

If YOU want to support it !!

I'd rather go with a removable drive carrier and 3x or more cheap drives for rotating and OFF-SITE backups ... If customer has the discipline and inclination.

... You may want to do a streaming backup to a web-based storage service, at nite ...

... You know the drill !

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May 9, 2010 6:23:47 AM

SSD is a WAY better way to go (for integrity) than RAID1, BTW ... accomplishes the same intent ... cheaper (to a point) and faster and even much more reliable ... not to mention, less complicated, if TRIM support is properly implemented ... no fuss.

I would sleep TWICE as well with SSD as with RAID1 ... and a big smile with every boot!

= Al =
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May 9, 2010 6:41:31 AM

Alvin Smith said:
RAID1 ??

If YOU want to support it !!

I'd rather go with a removable drive carrier and 3x or more cheap drives for rotating and OFF-SITE backups ... If customer has the discipline and inclination.

... You may want to do a streaming backup to a web-based storage service, at nite ...

... You know the drill !


Thanks Alvin, it's for the sake of redundancy/backup. I'll suggest to get an additional drive and use his current setup of Acronis to make nightly incremental backups.

..The i3-540 you sugested earlier supports integrated graphics, but the board you recommended does not. From my understanding of the Core i3's - graphics on-die work better with motherboard-integrated graphics. Is that correct? Can you think of an LGA 1156 board that supports on-board graphics? I've used Asus P7755H-M Pro on previous builds. It's the least expensive Asus 1156 board, on-board graphics but lacks some of the newer features of the Gigabyte board you recommended. This Asus doesn't have USB3 or SATA3, neither of which may be used in this environment in the foreseeable future.
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May 9, 2010 6:42:57 AM

Alvin Smith said:
SSD is a WAY better way to go (for integrity) than RAID1, BTW ... accomplishes the same intent ... cheaper (to a point) and faster and even much more reliable ... not to mention, less complicated, if TRIM support is properly implemented ... no fuss.

I would sleep TWICE as well with SSD as with RAID1 ... and a big smile with every boot!

= Al =


..Speaking of boot, should I keep Windows gest upgrading to Windows 7? What do you use/recommend?
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May 9, 2010 6:45:58 AM

Well ... The IGP is ON THE CPU ... The ports, of course, are on the mobo ...

Any gigabyte board that has an H in the model# implies HDMI port (i.e.UD3H)

Lemme re-check your "boo-boo catch" and see if I can correct.

= Al =
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May 9, 2010 6:49:38 AM

PS Win32 is fine, if you already have ... limits are 3.2 GB max RAM recognized (pretty sure) ...

... Win7-64Pro is what I would normally recommend to small businesses (and large).

Does that answer the OS question?

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May 9, 2010 6:54:12 AM

Alvin Smith said:
PS Win32 is fine, if you already have ... limits are 3.2 GB max RAM recognized (pretty sure) ...

... Win7-64Pro is what I would normally recommend to small businesses (and large).

Does that answer the OS question?


Thank you. That does answer the OS question for the most-part. I was just wondering if it's comfortable to say that Windows 7 is safe to replace XP. I'm still not sure if I should encourage a 64-bit upgrade, if that would make a significant difference?

..How much of an improvement does SSD make for day-to-day operations? I like your idea of SSD for boot drive, I guess local data storage of Outlook PST files, etc. and a larger drive for other data.
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May 9, 2010 6:59:02 AM


Yup ... Good catch ... Sorry and, glad you were on your toes ...

There is an issue with the fields in newegg power-search ... Again, my understanding is that the mobo only sports the video ports, but the IGP is on the CPU die.

... Here is ONE "fully adorned" premium solution ... with future ports, etc.

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

At a full $200, I think it not the most buisiness wise value. $140, would be MY target price, for mainstream utility.

= Al = Still lookin at mobos =
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May 9, 2010 7:22:28 AM

Thanks, that looks like an excellent choice, and a good way to try Gigabyte, from the usual Asus that I've used. How do they compare?

I'm still not sure about the regular performance enhancement of SD vs. the Samsung F3 you suggested.

Also, which PSU (or wattage) would you recommend for this build? I've used SPI 400W and Cooler Master Elite 460W, and been pretty happy with both.
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May 9, 2010 3:48:51 PM

I already said it once ... but shall reiterate ...

The main reason that I recommend qualified (TRIM) SSDs, for ALL business builds is RELIABILITY !!!

Both the MTBF and the TYPE/NATURE of failures is FAR superior, with SSD ...

While HDDs can fail (CRASH) at any time, entirely and catastrophically, SSDs will almost invariably start to manifest incremental degradation, in the form of individual write failures, at around 5 years of age.

These write failures are singular and, at first, they are quickly "mapped out" and normal operation continues, transparently (other than an error report) ...

As time goes on, these write failures will become more numerous until some pre-designated "unacceptable fail rate" is reached ...

At this point, the drives write functions are disabled permanently, and it will cease to write any more data.

BUT ... even after "total write failure" the SSD may be read from and backed up for many months, making recovery almost painless.

Fire and theft are the only true enemies of SSDs ...

... SSDs can handle 1000 times the shock (when moved or dropped) ... The president of Kingston strapped them to baseball bats and bowling pins ... It took a #4 Golf Iron to finally kill it.

SSDs can handle extreme temeratures and vibration and are safer to transport and ship.

They use far less power and do not suffer mechanical fatigue or alignment issues.

The system DOES need to be set up properly, but once AHCI is turned on, in bios, (indexing off, etc), you can ... "Just use them".

INTEL, Corsair "P" series, OCZ vertex (and vertex LTD.) as well as Kingston V+ are all great picks.

You may wish to dabble/test "on your own dime", at first, to gain personal experience, before foisting SSDs on your valued clients, but I would advise that "it is all good" ... all major issues have been worked out and we are "good to go", at this point.

As a tech who is responsible for ongoing support, I can say that I would sleep MUCH better with SSDs as system drives ... far less "catastrophic" emergencies.

... Oh, yeah ... they boot in 22 seconds and do everything else much (noticably) faster ... go figure!

= Al =

PS: Even when those inevitable write failures DO start to occur, they are quickly and transparently scrubbed, and mapped out, and re-written to a good location ... transparently, for some longish time ... NO DATA IS LOST WITH THESE FAILURES ... The drive attempts to write to a degraded region ... it can't ... so it writes to a good region and permanently marks the failed region as "bad" ... This can go on for some long time, before performance is noticably degraded.

Your customers will have plenty of warning and time to research and employ a replacement solution.

= OK ? =
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May 11, 2010 8:24:49 AM

Best answer selected by ramboaz.
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