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May 12, 2010 1:17:17 AM

Hello,


I'm possibly building a computer soon. Right now I'm weighing my options between buying a prebuilt or assembling one myself.

I only have around $1200, but I need everything, monitor, OS, and other peripherals. I can get the educational discount and receive Windows 7 Professional for $65. With the system, I need some sort of dongle or something like that to connect to the internet over a standard Wi-Fi system.

Now, this would be my first build, and I do have some concerns. If, during installation, I accidently push down on a part too hard and break a pin, can I get the part replaced? Or am I out of luck?

Thank you very much in advance.

More about : computer

a b B Homebuilt system
May 12, 2010 1:34:57 AM

I recommend building yourself. It is very straightforward and enjoyable. There's a Build Advice form in my signature that you should fill out to help us pick out some parts. There's a nice guide here by tecmo34 that should help you out with the building process as well.
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a b B Homebuilt system
May 12, 2010 9:43:11 AM

Yes with DIY you could hand pick quality hardware that won't die on you or proper casings that *you* like and even the size/form factor (Full Tower, Mid ATX, mATX, shoe boxes/cubes yada yada) to your taste unlike brand name PC makers where they dumo w/e case to you :p 

Builds mostly can be classified as:
Office/net/HTPC
Games
Serious CPU intensive tasks
or any combination of the above 3 ^^
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a b B Homebuilt system
May 12, 2010 3:02:39 PM

Like I have written before :

Why don't you build it yourself?
Reasons :
1. You don't know the components qualities of those prebuild. Same spec doesn't mean same quality.

2. The ability of being able to build your own rig is very profitable...I mean profitable... selling self built rigs gives you profit...

3. Prebuild usually more expensive with their quality, again...the specs could be the same.

4. Building rigs is just fun.

5. There will be no more PC salesmen who can cheat you after being able to build your own rig.

6. After building you rig. Installing OS and getting it running is also very profitable.....believe me...next time your PC or your friends PC is broken...you can fix it yourself...again..can be profitable...and no more ..."Mamaaaaa, my computer is broken can you call the someone to repair it?"

7. I find it embarrasing,when someone install a game and then complains that the game won't run...this happens to a friend of mine.....hellooo...he tried to install Crysis on PIII 800 + 256MB SDRAM + FX5200....This won't happen if you now your hardware..Building yourself makes that you know what is inside your computer and have the basic knowledge to understand minimum/recomended requirements of games....

Many more reasons..

BTW :
1. If you run into troubles building your PC...you got us here in this forum.. don't be afraid!
2. You can have a good self built PC with your budget.
3. About the broken parts caused by too hardly pushed...hmmm...didn't happen to me even once.. use your feeling too...and learn...brute strength won't solve all problem!

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a b B Homebuilt system
May 12, 2010 4:06:47 PM

If you manage to break something during the install, you're unlikely to be able to have it replaced.

That being said, it's rather difficult to force things so hard that you break them. Typically, there's only one right way (and it's pretty obvious) to put tab A in slot B, and if you're having to strain at all, it should be obvious that something isn't right.

Please be aware that this is a homebuilt forum, and most of the answers you get are going to be directed at building it yourself. You are likely to get many posts telling you to build it yourself. You certainly don't have to, and you can take the recommendations given and attempt to apply them to a pre-built, but it's not always going to fit quite right. The reason regulars on this forum aren't interested in pre-built computers is because typically those businesses cut corners on some of the less-visible parts, such as the power supply, RAM, and hard drives. This doesn't make them bad people, but it does mean that the parts may not be as good as if you bought them yourself and built the computer on your own.
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May 12, 2010 8:10:33 PM


Well, it looks like I'm going to build my own.

Can you guys recommend me parts and peripherals for my budget?
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May 12, 2010 9:46:50 PM

APPROXIMATE PURCHASE DATE: By the end of May BUDGET RANGE: Under $1200

SYSTEM USAGE FROM MOST TO LEAST IMPORTANT: Gaming, Programming, Watching Movies, Web Surfing
PARTS NOT REQUIRED: I need everything

PREFERRED WEBSITE(S) FOR PARTS: Newegg.com (I pay tax on Newegg though due to the fact I live in California) Amazon.com. I don't have experience with Tigerdirect. COUNTRY OF ORIGIN: California, United States
PARTS PREFERENCES: No real preference, although I probably would dislike a Powercolor part.

OVERCLOCKING: Maybe SLI OR CROSSFIRE: Maybe

MONITOR RESOLUTION: Whatever resolution the monitor you recommend has. I would like HD.
ADDITIONAL COMMENTS: I need everything, mouse, monitor, and OS for my <$1200 budget. Fortunately, I have the ability to have the educational discount on Windows 7 professional (for $65).

Thanks.
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a b B Homebuilt system
May 12, 2010 10:30:44 PM
May 12, 2010 11:15:29 PM

Looks fairly good.

Is it possible to maybe get a 5850? It would be nice, although not imperative.
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a b B Homebuilt system
May 13, 2010 12:38:01 AM

You could, but it would put you a bit over budget. On the other hand, the build I posted will support crossfire if you need to add another 5770.
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a b B Homebuilt system
May 13, 2010 1:19:33 AM

Yeah add $150.

Otherwise you can drop the board and proc and get something more like a Rana x3 3.0. Personally I would go ahead and add $150.

Otherwise it's an excellent build suggestion.
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May 13, 2010 3:30:36 AM

Am I going to need anything special to build this? Any thermal paste?

Is that CPU cooler difficult to install? Is it necessary?
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a b B Homebuilt system
May 13, 2010 4:13:41 AM

Nope, just a screwdriver. The thermal paste comes with the Hyper. It is not terribly hard to install, but imo, it is one of the harder parts to install. Nothing to worry about though.
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Best solution

a b B Homebuilt system
May 13, 2010 11:43:00 AM

$1011 AR + $65 for your OS ^^
Share
May 13, 2010 11:48:32 AM

^ No on that build. Also could you please stop posting those useless pictures and instead use links. What does ^^ mean and why do you always type it?
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a b B Homebuilt system
May 13, 2010 3:01:12 PM

batuchka's build looks pretty good to me. You could spend a little more money on the case or something, but other than that, I don't see a lot of room for improvement.
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May 13, 2010 4:17:37 PM

That does look good.

And to the other person saying no, why is it bad?

EDIT: I'm stupid. I forgot to mention I need wireless connectivity.
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a b B Homebuilt system
May 13, 2010 5:58:53 PM

His build is not bad, it's just different. You won't be able to crossfire but you will have a stronger GPU. Just my personal opinions but I'm not the biggest fan of the PSU or RAM, but they could work.

Here's a wireless adaptor.
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
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May 13, 2010 6:16:37 PM

jbakerlent said:
His build is not bad, it's just different. You won't be able to crossfire but you will have a stronger GPU. Just my personal opinions but I'm not the biggest fan of the PSU or RAM, but they could work.

Here's a wireless adaptor.
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...



I'll just be able to plug that into the computer and connect to my home's network?
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a b B Homebuilt system
May 13, 2010 6:34:39 PM

^ Correct. You'll need to install some drivers for it first - they come on a disc with it.
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a b B Homebuilt system
May 13, 2010 8:18:30 PM

I am not sure how the Hyper212 connects to the CPU, but if it is with a base and screws I find it much easier to install than the stock heatsink.

Don't be too worried about breaking things, as long as you are careful there should be no risk of snapping anything. When I first built my first computer the only time I was concerned about applying too much pressure was when installing the clip in stock heatsink, aside from that there is never a time you are pushing hard.

I don't know what american sites are like, but a place in the UK where I buy my parts actually offer 'Builders Insurance' for about £30 - if you break anything during building your computer they will replace the part. Pretty cool, never used it myself but had it been there the first time I built I may have taken it.

As for the build, I personally prefer a cheaper mobo and a better GPU. I would even happily lose XFire capability in order to have a 5850. But I always prefer one strong card over 2 weak ones
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May 14, 2010 12:12:45 AM

Is it possible to make this an i5-750 build? Just curious.

I should add there is a Fry's and Microcenter near me.
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a b B Homebuilt system
May 14, 2010 8:56:52 AM

coldsleep said:
batuchka's build looks pretty good to me. You could spend a little more money on the case or something, but other than that, I don't see a lot of room for improvement.


Thank you for your kind words ^^
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a b B Homebuilt system
May 14, 2010 9:00:06 AM

asteldian said:


As for the build, I personally prefer a cheaper mobo and a better GPU. I would even happily lose XFire capability in order to have a 5850. But I always prefer one strong card over 2 weak ones


I have lost count the number of cleints i have with "white elephant" CF/SLI mobos with overly outdated GPUs that get awfully thrashed by current gen GPUs ^^ Go for the best frames/$$ single GPU and be glad is my mantra: there is no suuch thing as a "future proof" GPU if you are constantly gaming so why get stuck with not 1 but 2 outdated GPUs later ...on top on pumping for that expensive mobo :non: 
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a b B Homebuilt system
May 14, 2010 9:05:10 AM

Yes, I agree +1. The only time when I'd really consider crossfiring is if you don't have enough money to get the better card, know that you will keep the build for a long time, and would prefer to keep the original GPU and add a second one rather than replace it with a newer one.
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a b B Homebuilt system
May 14, 2010 1:54:16 PM

i5 750 and X4 955 are not very different in performance...just choose which one you like.

You could also consider having Lynksis WMP600N for your WLAN, it is a PCI WLAN-Card. I use this under Win7 x64, and it runs well without any problem.

+1 for batuchka's specs recommendation.
+1 for single powerful GPU.
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May 15, 2010 11:22:12 PM

Well, prices have changed and now that build w/o the OS is over $1200 with Cali tax.

Any changes?
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May 17, 2010 1:43:55 AM

Are the Crosshair motherboards any good?
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May 17, 2010 2:47:45 AM

Never looked into them. What one are you looking at?
Reviewing the parts on the build above, you might be able to shave off $10 or 15 by getting cheaper RAM. Tom's hardware has a great liking for some crucial stuff which should be a bit less. You might be able to get away with a smaller PSU if you give up a wish for crossfire. I'm not a PSU expert, so I won't venture to recommend one. You could drop the aftermarket cooler for now and get it later as an upgrade, since the processor comes with one of its own. If you do give up crossfire, a much cheaper motherboard would suffice, though I would stick with a main brand one. In this regard, are usb 3 and sata 6G important to you?
I hope that these changes will bring you back under budget, and allow you to get a beefier GFX card.
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May 17, 2010 3:01:25 AM

I wouldn't consider those two to be important to me, but I think for future proofing, it is important. It is fairly important for this computer to be upgradeable and able to last for a while.

I can stretch the budget another $100-$200 I guess if I could get an Intel and NVIDIA.
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a b B Homebuilt system
May 17, 2010 6:03:06 AM

I don't want to say bad words about nVidia but at this moment I personally recommend you to stick with ATI.
Basically it is about price over performance value and power consumption efficiency, ATI wins on those categories
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May 17, 2010 11:47:13 AM

Computers have begun to meet the barrier imposed by the speed of light in achieving higher speeds. This has led to research and development in the areas of parallel computers and distributed computers
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May 17, 2010 12:42:11 PM

guanyu210379 said:
I don't want to say bad words about nVidia but at this moment I personally recommend you to stick with ATI.
Basically it is about price over performance value and power consumption efficiency, ATI wins on those categories

Also consider that while no mainbord is futureproof, AMD has a very good track record of supporting their CPU socket long before the mainboard has seen an end-of-life, so there is a very good chance that the next generation of processors will fit your mainboard with, at the very least, a BIOS update. It is already shown that LGA1156 is dead end, so upgrades to that chipset will be very short lived.

Also, another reason to consider Crossfirex is to utilize the onboard graphics. If you have a very fast discrete GPU, Crossfirex will run you onboard graphics when you aren't doing anything 3D intense (saving you on power) and fire up the discrete GPU when you start your game, etc.
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May 17, 2010 12:54:07 PM

guanyu210379 said:
Like I have written before :

Why don't you build it yourself?
Reasons :
1. You don't know the components qualities of those prebuild. Same spec doesn't mean same quality.

2. The ability of being able to build your own rig is very profitable...I mean profitable... selling self built rigs gives you profit...

3. Prebuild usually more expensive with their quality, again...the specs could be the same.

4. Building rigs is just fun.

5. There will be no more PC salesmen who can cheat you after being able to build your own rig.

6. After building you rig. Installing OS and getting it running is also very profitable.....believe me...next time your PC or your friends PC is broken...you can fix it yourself...again..can be profitable...and no more ..."Mamaaaaa, my computer is broken can you call the someone to repair it?"

7. I find it embarrasing,when someone install a game and then complains that the game won't run...this happens to a friend of mine.....hellooo...he tried to install Crysis on PIII 800 + 256MB SDRAM + FX5200....This won't happen if you now your hardware..Building yourself makes that you know what is inside your computer and have the basic knowledge to understand minimum/recomended requirements of games....

Many more reasons..

BTW :
1. If you run into troubles building your PC...you got us here in this forum.. don't be afraid!
2. You can have a good self built PC with your budget.
3. About the broken parts caused by too hardly pushed...hmmm...didn't happen to me even once.. use your feeling too...and learn...brute strength won't solve all problem!


I aggre with you
if you install any game on a PIII machine IT WILL NOT RUN!!!
Pentuim 3 machines are like from the 1500's

you are also right about building your own machine
i resently built one for 200 bucks and some spare parts
here is the specs:
AMD Athlon II x3 OCed @ 3.4ghz(core temps dont exede 65c with stock cooler!!!)
Gigibyte Mobo with ATI radeon HD 6200
500 gb WD blue
DVD-RW
1gb RAM OCed to 1200 mhz (will up grade when i get the money)
Mid-Tower case
350 Watt PSU

Keep in mind i built this for UNDER 300 dollars and it is a fast machine
with a 12000 dollar budget DUDE you've got it made!!!
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May 17, 2010 1:14:22 PM
May 17, 2010 1:17:33 PM

PLUS 65 for OS and 20 for DVD-RW = 1370 which means 170 more than your budget and you've got a computer that will last you 10 years and is SUPER future prof (until intel come out with another socket :)  )
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May 17, 2010 1:43:20 PM

Eh, I'd prefer a GPU stronger than a 4770.
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May 17, 2010 8:49:17 PM

Drailing said:
Eh, I'd prefer a GPU stronger than a 4770.


You're perfectly right in that perference.
Also justin, you forgot that he needs a screen.
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May 17, 2010 9:18:42 PM

OK, so time to post my own build. The first two parts I've borrowed from the first build posted here.

ASUS Black DVD Burner - Bulk - OEM
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
$26

SAMSUNG 2494SW Glossy Black 24" 5ms Widescreen LCD Monitor 300 cd/m2 DC 50000:1 (1000:1)
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
$230

Antec TruePower New TP-650 650W Continuous Power ATX12V V2.3 / EPS12V V2.91 SLI Certified CrossFire Ready 80 PLUS BRONZE Certified Active PFC "compatible with Core i7/Core i5" Power Supply
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
$100

The rest are my own.

GIGABYTE GA-790XTA-UD4 AM3 AMD 790X SATA 6Gb/s USB 3.0 ATX AMD Motherboard
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
$125

AMD Phenom II X4 955 Black Edition Deneb 3.2GHz 4 x 512KB L2 Cache 6MB L3 Cache Socket AM3 125W Quad-Core Processor
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
$160

G.SKILL Ripjaws Series 4GB (2 x 2GB) 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM DDR3 1333 (PC3 10666) Desktop Memory Model F3-10666CL9D-4GBRL
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
$105

Antec Three Hundred Illusion Black Steel ATX Mid Tower Computer Case
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
$60

Or at least I knew about them, and would have recommended them anyway ;) 

OK, back again.

GIGABYTE GV-R585OC-1GD Radeon HD 5850 (Cypress Pro) 1GB 256-bit GDDR5 PCI Express 2.1 x16 HDCP Ready CrossFireX Support Video Card w/ ATI Eyefinity
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
$310


TOTAL: $1116

you'll have to add in shipping yourself.
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May 18, 2010 12:28:02 AM

elel said:
OK, so time to post my own build. The first two parts I've borrowed from the first build posted here.

ASUS Black DVD Burner - Bulk - OEM
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

SAMSUNG 2494SW Glossy Black 24" 5ms Widescreen LCD Monitor 300 cd/m2 DC 50000:1 (1000:1)
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

The next I borrowed from the latest build.

RAIDMAX RX-600AF 600W ATX12V / EPS12V 80 PLUS BRONZE Certified Power Supply
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

The rest are my own.

GIGABYTE GA-790XTA-UD4 AM3 AMD 790X SATA 6Gb/s USB 3.0 ATX AMD Motherboard
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

AMD Phenom II X4 955 Black Edition Deneb 3.2GHz 4 x 512KB L2 Cache 6MB L3 Cache Socket AM3 125W Quad-Core Processor
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

G.SKILL Ripjaws Series 4GB (2 x 2GB) 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM DDR3 1333 (PC3 10666) Desktop Memory Model F3-10666CL9D-4GBRL
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Antec Three Hundred Illusion Black Steel ATX Mid Tower Computer Case
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Or at least I knew about them, and would have recommended them anyway ;) 
This isn't complete yet. I gotta go now, check back in a couple of hours and I should be able to finish it. But so far I think it comes out to just under 800 dollars, so there's allot of headroom left in your budget for awesome gfx and cooling.



My concern is with the PSU. It doesn't look all that great.
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May 18, 2010 3:11:34 AM

(edit: contents were out of date)
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May 19, 2010 2:04:44 AM

OK, there is my revised build. It is pretty close to the edge of your budget. If you need to cut back more, the screen and power supply would be where I'd do it. The power supply you have now should be able to handle crossfire 5850's (though just).
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May 22, 2010 4:12:41 AM

Best answer selected by Drailing.
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