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Ati 4890 overheat-pc restarts

Last response: in Graphics & Displays
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April 13, 2010 10:36:07 AM

hi guys
every time i play any games, after about 10 minutes my pc restarts. i have asus ati 4890 and amd phenom II 955.these are the temperature stats of my graphics card ( according to ati catalyst)

idle 69 degree celcius
load 92 and above (and then pc restarts)
then i experimented by keeping the side panel of my case open . there was a dramatic decrease in temp.
idle 62 degree celcius
load 82 degee celcius
and this time temp remained stable at abt 82 and my pc didnt restart even after half an hour.
i have a zebronics reaper case. the fan arrangement in it are:
1)120 mm side fan blowing air inside
2)80 mm side fan blowing air outside
3)80 mm exhaust fan at top
the side panel i removed had the first 2 fans. . .the case has slots for two more 120 mm fans in the front and at back.wat is my exact problem and wat should i do to rectify it.is my air circulation wrong .should i install any additional fans . any help will be highly appeciable. the cpu temperature is about 48 degree at idle and 57 degree at load and it remains the same even after keeping the side panel open.
p.s:the temp raise even if i left the ceiling fan in my room off and if the pc runs throughout the night with the ceiling an off, the next morning i find that it has restarted.also i havent done any overclocking. . i donot get any kind of flickering in games at any point even when the temp is at 95 . .and my pc is only abt 7 months old


this is how my case looks



this is the position of my graphics card fan its stock cooler is facing down towards the bottom of the case
April 13, 2010 11:24:16 AM

Try to make the bottom fan suck air in too. In general if you are trying to suck hot air out there it will just rise and get sucked into the intake fan anyway...

Sucking cool air in the bottom should also help give the card some fresh air and run it cooler.

A last option would be to increase the fan speed on the card in CCC.
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April 13, 2010 12:13:07 PM

My solution when I had a 2900XT (very hot card) was to remove the side panel and set up a 8 inch fan blowing in.

Definitely need the bottom fan in.

Is the computer stable with the side off?
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April 13, 2010 12:18:33 PM

They should both be intakes, all your doing is counteracting the flow of cooler air and either having the warm air stagnate around the card, or starving it of air. The power supply, rear, and top should all output enough air from the case. Also the card could probably do with a little dusting.
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April 13, 2010 12:59:56 PM

EXT64 said:
My solution when I had a 2900XT (very hot card) was to remove the side panel and set up a 8 inch fan blowing in.

Definitely need the bottom fan in.

Is the computer stable with the side off?


yes the pc is stable with the side off. . .thanks for the reply . i think i have to reverse the bottom fan so that it sucks air in . but then i dont have any other fan blowing air out . is it necessary then to have a rear fan which blows air out. . .
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April 13, 2010 1:01:20 PM

nukemaster said:
Try to make the bottom fan suck air in too. In general if you are trying to suck hot air out there it will just rise and get sucked into the intake fan anyway...

Sucking cool air in the bottom should also help give the card some fresh air and run it cooler.

A last option would be to increase the fan speed on the card in CCC.


thanks for the prompt reply. i think i have to reverse the bottom fan so that it sucks air in as almost everyone is stating so . but then i dont have any other fan blowing air out .how will all the warm air go out. is it necessary then to have a rear fan which blows air out. . .
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April 13, 2010 1:30:20 PM

Hey there,

As mentioned by other members, the bottom fan should be an INTAKE fan. You should also install install an EXHAUST fan on the REAR.

Finally, disassemble the fans and clean away any dust on the fan filters.

Good luck.
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April 13, 2010 1:34:08 PM

Don't worry too much about getting air out. People make the mistake of thinking, "I have 3 fans going in, I need 3 fans blowing out." This is flawed reasoning. Why? Because your PSU also blows air out, and so does your video card. So if you have equal fans performing intake and exhaust duty, you've created a negative pressure situation, which will cause the system to try and suck in air through cracks in the case. This is bad because this draws dust into the case, eventually causing those cracks to become clogged, which can lead to overheating.

Here's a great little explanation of why positive air pressure inside a case is beneficial: http://www.demcifilter.com/positive_pressure.htm
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April 13, 2010 8:16:32 PM

Funny you mention positive pressure. I generally go negative. I have no front fans I let the rear/top one(s) and side(my only intake that cools my card + chipset) one take care of getting air in the case. Since it is and open design, i have no problems with this.

I DO recommend a rear fan(you can try the side fan in the back and side and compare the temps) simply because I do not want my PSU to suck any heat it does not have to since this reduces its life and power output depending on the power supply.
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April 14, 2010 3:41:53 AM

Well I'm not talking extreme positive pressure, as in 200cfm in and 100cfm out. I mean something relatively balanced, just slightly favoring positive. More like 200cfm in, 190cfm out.

If you have a fully perforated and filtered case, using strictly negative flow can and does work. But, not all cases are the same. Properly managing air flow within each one is different and takes planning. That's why I linked DEMCi's guide.
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April 14, 2010 3:54:44 AM

For sure. I was not trying to argue with you. I have a preference to keep the noise of fans in the back and side. I have seen some HP systems with positive pressure work well.
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