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Never did a raid before - is this possible?

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June 28, 2012 3:31:23 PM

i have never set up a raid setup in my comp before as ive always used just one drive for everything. but now im looking to do a win7 boot via ssd and getting two identical regular hdds as storage.

are the two hdds able to be setup with raid 1 (identical backups) with them being the boot drives with the OS loaded on board?

and when the raid is set up, what will i see in windows? will i only see 1 hdd as well as my ssd? how will i know if the raid is actually set up or working and duplicating my data?

thanks much for your help!

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June 28, 2012 3:42:01 PM

I have ths setup. I use my SSD as the boot drive. this makes my PC start really fast. The main benefit from having an SSD is to use it as a boot drive for your OS. The RAID 1 would be used as a storage drive.

I have a boot drive SSD and a RAID 1 drive which consists of two 1 TB drives. If you only see one drive then it is working. Also Intel has a program that you can use to monitor RAID configurations.

Also... avoid using green drives in the RAID.
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a b G Storage
June 28, 2012 3:59:39 PM

If your doing raid its pointless to use say a 250 GB drive with a 1TB drive because it will only use the the small drive as the raid size. If your going to create a raid one drive with a SSD you should use two of the same size.
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a b G Storage
June 28, 2012 3:59:59 PM

I'm assuming you want to use your motherboard's chipset RAID.

Most people use a single SSD as their boot-drive and use any extra capacity to install their high-performance applications on it. Chipset RAID-1 is a decent (but not perfect) way of providing redundancy for your data. Do not think that your data will be bulletproof - you should still backup data that can't be replaced to something outside of your machine. A RAID-1 consisting of two identical HDDs can be used for anything you like but is usually used for regular or somewhat sensitive data and non-demanding applications. It would appear as a single volume.

You can install Windows on either, but I would highly suggest you install Windows on the SSD. Go into BIOS and make sure "SATA Mode" is set to "RAID". Then plug the SSD in by itself (don't plug in the HDDs yet) and install Windows on the SSD. Once Windows is fully installed, then follow the instructions in your motherboard's manual on how to setup a RAID-1.
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June 28, 2012 4:03:41 PM

baddad said:
If your doing raid its pointless to use say a 250 GB drive with a 1TB drive because it will only use the the small drive as the raid size. If your going to create a raid one drive with a SSD you should use two of the same size.


Where is the OP using a 250 GB Drive with a 1 TB drive... He says he has 2 identical HDDs..
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a b G Storage
June 28, 2012 4:22:20 PM

pacioli said:
Where is the OP using a 250 GB Drive with a 1 TB drive... He says he has 2 identical HDDs..

I was referring to what you wrote because when I first read it it look like you used two different drives, did you edit what you wrote?
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June 28, 2012 4:27:17 PM

baddad said:
I was referring to what you wrote because when I first read it it look like you used two different drives, did you edit what you wrote?

Yes I edited my post... 15 minutes before you posted...
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June 29, 2012 4:55:06 AM

good good info.

so basically what im doing is getting a 256gb ssd and then pairing it with two 320gb 7200rpm drives set in raid 1.

why not "green" drives?
and raid 1 isnt bulletproof? doh...
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June 29, 2012 9:04:05 PM

kaitanium said:
good good info.

so basically what im doing is getting a 256gb ssd and then pairing it with two 320gb 7200rpm drives set in raid 1.

why not "green" drives?
and raid 1 isnt bulletproof? doh...


If you have 256 Gb SSD I'd definitely make it your boot drive and install most programs on it too. The 320 GB drives will store quite a bit of media in a more secure manner.

'Green' drives have power saving features/programming that power the drives up and down according to use. Two Green drives will not necessarily be synced 100% in their powering up and down. With any RAID setup the drives must be doing the same thing at all times. If one drive is just a tiny bit slower in spinning up than the other drive the writes and reads will not be syncronized and data corruption will occur.

Non-Green drives are designed for performance. They only have one setting, fast! So the risk of running out of sync is greatly reduced.
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June 29, 2012 9:09:14 PM

so what happens if there is corruption on one drive but not the other? does the OS check if both drives are fully synced? from what i read, raid 1 has no rebuilding of data or checks associated with corruption
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June 29, 2012 9:25:41 PM

There are checks... The software on the RAID chip manages the error correction not the OS. The OS treats the drive like a single normal drive.
It's just that the errors are so frequent on green drives that it creates a self corrupting loop... It just gets worse and worse... The bigger the differences in drives the more the 'green' features get them out of sync.

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