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OCZ's Vertex 3 Pro: Second-Gen SandForce Perf Preview

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February 18, 2011 4:00:03 AM

Intel's X25-M revolutionized the SSD market. But then SandForce turned it upside down, coming out of nowhere to establish a dominant position. Today we see the company preview its second-generation controller, unleashed over a native 6 Gb/s interface.

OCZ's Vertex 3 Pro: Second-Gen SandForce Perf Preview : Read more
February 18, 2011 4:08:33 AM

Performance looks great but I don't think the price will be.
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February 18, 2011 4:18:51 AM

This is why i haven't bought a SSD yet. One it's freakin expensive 2 not enough capacity 3 it's freakin expensive! It'll go down next year when the world ends in 2012.
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February 18, 2011 4:33:27 AM

Price is lower then last generation. A shrink in die size means cheaper manufacturing costs, lower power usage, and better performance. Thats what happens when every hardware company shrinks their chips.
Considering this is going to have the same amount of space, its going to be a cheaper SSD.
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February 18, 2011 5:03:27 AM

500MB/s... wow
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February 18, 2011 5:53:12 AM

These are for enterprise use, that's why they are priced so high. They have features average consumers don't need. In other words, you're wasting your money if you are putting these into your home computer.
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February 18, 2011 6:31:33 AM

OCZ Vertex 3 Pro MSRP Pricing:
100GB: $525, $5.35 per GB
200GB: $775, $3.88 per GB
400GB: $1350, $3.38 per GB

Getting cheaper, but still far outside my price range given their relative capacities. Even taking their amazing performance into account, it's still going to be a difficult sell for all but the most passionate enthusiasts, pros with heavy server workloads, or hardcore idiots. You're definitely not going to be getting your moneys worth putting one of these into your gaming rig. Enterprise type applications experience the largest benefits from these types of drives, and it's probably the only application where the performance benefits balance out the higher costs.
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February 18, 2011 9:15:04 AM

The article made it perfectly clear the drive is not a drive that will be offered to consumers, gamers, and pc enthusiasts. How is OCZ going to reduce prices for consumer drives? Reduce features? Cut corners? Replace high quality components with lesser quality components? On answer is OCZ will reduc features. I'd like to know what else OCZ is going to do.
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Anonymous
February 18, 2011 9:34:57 AM

Please add a TrueCrypt benchmark to your SSD evaluations, for two reasons. First, the difficulty of truly erasing data on a flash drive makes data security more important. Second, there are drives (like Sandforce) that use compression and may behave differently when storing encrypted (high entropy) data.
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February 18, 2011 9:36:01 AM

About time
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February 18, 2011 10:51:14 AM

Presently Plextor M2-M2S offer 370-420MB/s read for what... (64gb)150$-(128gb)250$. Vextor 3 price is out of the loop, it's too expensive. At this price I can buy 2 Plextor and put them in RAID 0.
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February 18, 2011 10:58:20 AM

THANK YOU

you finaly put normal hdds in a ssd review with tests, its nice to see the comparison.

now i do hate to ask this... but until SATA 6 Gb/s hit the market big, can we get the drive also tested in a SATA 3 Gb/s configuration? this would be largely bennifitial to people to know. because im assuming that even with the 3's limited bandwidth, some operations will still be faster between the two
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February 18, 2011 12:43:41 PM

I just got a 256GB Mushkin IO SSD directly from the Mushkin store for $200.
http://www.mushkin.com/Digital-Storage/SSDs/MKNSSDIO256...

It sold out pretty fast though.

But it was under $1 per GB finally. It's not blazing like this drive but its about 250MB/s read and 180MB/s write with 20,000 IOPS. Considering it's 4x cheaper for the capacity compared to this drive I think it was worth it.
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February 18, 2011 12:46:48 PM

Didn't see the new Plextor drives when I was ordering Corsair Performance 3 128GB SSD at newEgg. Well... I'm pretty happy with it anyway. Hope the day comes soon when regular HDDs will be remember as much as music tapes today :-) and where 2TB 1GB/s SSDs are standard :) 
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February 18, 2011 1:05:08 PM

uhmm where is the C300?
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Anonymous
February 18, 2011 1:12:20 PM

You have to multiply the power (watts) by the time it took in order to get a meaningful, comparable number (energy).
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February 18, 2011 1:24:53 PM

Why did the review have comparison against the other top SATA 6 drive out there today, EG, Crucial C300? Very odd.
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February 18, 2011 1:27:06 PM

I agree, where is the Crucial C300. Go to Anandtech, they show the C300 in their review. If you own a C300 you will happy to see that it is still a relevant SSD. The Vertex 3 doesn't blow it away.
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February 18, 2011 1:42:42 PM

I second ChrisHF. Power is free. It's energy that costs money and raises temperatures inside a PC case. Please include either Joules (1 Watt = 1 Joule / second), Wh (3600 Joules) or kWh (3.6 M Joules) in your discussions about energy consumption. You always end up having to note that something uses more power but finishes faster... by graphing the relative energy consumption rather than the power consumption, you automatically resolve this confusion.

Other than that, thanks for the article. If anything, hopefully the faster high-end devices will cause lower-end devices to reduce in price just like what happens with CPUs. I can only hope.
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February 18, 2011 2:10:05 PM

I really like the performance specs but those prices are painful!
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February 18, 2011 4:09:04 PM

The diagram of flash transistor is missing the SiO2 layer
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February 18, 2011 6:22:05 PM

Impressive how intel's offering continues to be right there. I'd only trust that SSD.
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February 18, 2011 6:29:18 PM

No thanks. I'll pass on SSDs until 2013. Maybe they'll be affordable by then.
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February 18, 2011 7:10:31 PM

Over $500 for 100GB SSD? Ew! That's crazy talk. Definitely worth buying an X25M or Agility/Vertex 2 over one of these for price/performance, and $/GB.
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February 18, 2011 7:22:52 PM

These are the droids youre looking for... no seriously these drives are NOT for home use. The PRO series is just that for enterprise.
And thats definately WOWing me ... if I need to through this into the Xenserver with Netcaching for VDI deployment.. CRAP I WANT/NEED THIS!!!
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Anonymous
February 18, 2011 10:42:48 PM

I don't get a lot of these comments:
Price: It's an enterprise class drive
How will they make it cheaper: Decreased reserve space, absence of super capacitor, etc. All in the article. Not to mention the intentional inflation of prices for enterprise segment.
Cost per gig: again, enterprise class. Look at the relative costs of the vertex 2 and vertex 2 pro. There is a gap.
Absence of testing on 3gb/sec: ??? The entire point of the article was to test a drive that would totally saturate the 3gb/sec system. 3gb/sec =375MB/sec. This is the absolute max it could achieve and it would probably be within 10% of that in real use. Who cares? Why on earth would you spend the money on the drive if your system cannot utilize it. Get two of the previous generation and split the load across two connections in raid0, get a PCI-E controller card with 6gb/s, or forget about it.
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February 19, 2011 4:43:30 AM

SSD manufacturers should really start focusing on increasing the capacity and lowering the cost. These types of speeds are cool and all, but completely pointless for most applications.

The only major application that would really see a benefit from is image/video processing. Trying to capture uncompressed video is the only process which can typically actually max out a connection other than backups. Backups can be automated and run during down-time, though, so that's not much of any issue.

Of course... Uncompressed video takes up something like 400GB and hour for 720p.... Yay! A $1400 drive can hold half a movie worth of footage. God help you if you want 1080p.

Super-fast read/writes don't mean much if there isn't enough space to read/write the information. It's simply not practical.

Now IOSpeed... That can be useful for servers, no doubt, but it's obvious that there wasn't any new R&D put into that aspect since the numbers match previous generations.

I won't say this is a completely pointless advancement of the technology, it will become relevant some day, but the research is improving the wrong things.
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February 19, 2011 5:19:55 AM

italiabrainI don't get a lot of these comments:p rice: It's an enterprise class driveHow will they make it cheaper: Decreased reserve space, absence of super capacitor, etc. All in the article. Not to mention the intentional inflation of prices for enterprise segment.Cost per gig: again, enterprise class. Look at the relative costs of the vertex 2 and vertex 2 pro. There is a gap.Absence of testing on 3gb/sec: ??? The entire point of the article was to test a drive that would totally saturate the 3gb/sec system. 3gb/sec =375MB/sec. This is the absolute max it could achieve and it would probably be within 10% of that in real use. Who cares? Why on earth would you spend the money on the drive if your system cannot utilize it. Get two of the previous generation and split the load across two connections in raid0, get a PCI-E controller card with 6gb/s, or forget about it.


well lets look at it this way, if i re wrote that drive 100gb a day, every day, it would last close to 7 years.

computers however, only last 2-4 years depending on your build.

lets say im on year 3 of a high end build. ill probably replace the computer entirely within 2 years.

windows craps out, or something along those lines, so i decided to get a new boot drive. do i get a 3gb/sec or a 6gb/sec, knowing that in within 2 years i will get a 6gb/sec system?

this is a hypothetical, but a real world reason for geting a 6gb/sec over a 3gb/sec
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February 19, 2011 4:23:09 PM

falchardPrice is lower then last generation. A shrink in die size means cheaper manufacturing costs, lower power usage, and better performance. Thats what happens when every hardware company shrinks their chips.Considering this is going to have the same amount of space, its going to be a cheaper SSD.



Die shrink of NAND flash chips tends to have less write cycles and a bit less performance but reduced cost.
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February 19, 2011 10:20:11 PM

When it comes to a SSD, I am only concerned with life time durability and random 4k read & write. Got a 30gb kingston ssd for like $68 last year and is holding up nicely as a paging drive.
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February 20, 2011 12:53:47 PM

I'll stick by 2 X 1TB 7200rpm HDD's in RAID0 thanks ... 2TB of space ... less than $180.

Until SSD's can come a lot closer to HDD's in terms of price and size ... they are out for me.

Plus, I don't see they last long enough to warrant the cost.


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February 20, 2011 5:05:20 PM

Bigmac80This is why i haven't bought a SSD yet. One it's freakin expensive 2 not enough capacity 3 it's freakin expensive! It'll go down next year when the world ends in 2012.


You can get a 120 Gig Vertex 2 for $170USD to $200USD and it is very worth it. No more excuses!
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February 20, 2011 5:07:02 PM

You could buy two Vertex 120 gigs for cheaper than the 100 or 200 gig and have more space and less cost in RAID.

Yeah I know they're not enterprise!
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Anonymous
February 21, 2011 2:44:37 PM


Odd that you would compare an Enterprise drive (OCZ) against a consumer
grade drives (Crucial and Intel X25M.

"...we find that the Porsche is quicker and more nimble than the Prius." Not very useful.

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February 21, 2011 7:28:54 PM

Didn't anyone notice the Agility 2 being faster than the Vertex 2? Isn't it supposed to be the other way round?
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