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Liquid Nitrogen Overclocking, Inc., Resolved Intel Hardware Bug

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February 1, 2011 12:13:33 PM

Liquid Nitrogen Overclocking, Inc., has announced a hardware solution for all of those plagued by the Intel P67 motherboards' SATA II bug. News of Intel's intended massive recall of approximately 8 million motherboards spread at the end of January, and on February 1, 2011, LNO made their announcement public.

(and from the "Read More..." button)

Liquid Nitrogen Overclocking made an announcement on February 1, 2011, that it has resolved the hardware bug plaguing the Intel P67 motherboards identified as having SATA II problems. For $250 it can fix any motherboard, provided that the customer pays for shipping their system to one of their authorized locations. All motherboards would then be guaranteed by a one year warranty, free from any SATA II defects as described by the Intel annoucements.

In order to qualify for the hardware fix, you must send your computer to an Authorized Liquid Nitrogen Overclocking Partner Participation Center.
a b V Motherboard
February 1, 2011 12:24:04 PM

Opportunistic ripoff?

Why don't we just attach our SATA drives to the SATA 3.0 ports and wait for our free replacements?
February 1, 2011 12:31:31 PM

Millions of boards are in the process of being sent back to Intel, and Sandy Bridge systems will soon disappear. They came up with a hardware SOLUTION, not just plugging SATA devices of one kind into a port of a different kind.
a b V Motherboard
February 2, 2011 1:44:03 AM

Um, $250 to repair boards that the manufacturers are replacing for free? Hell most 1155 boards don't even cost near $250. What a stupid scam.

a b K Overclocking
a b V Motherboard
February 2, 2011 3:04:34 AM

What a dumb idea.. 250 and we will fix your board you can get fixed for free.
February 2, 2011 11:51:46 AM

Well Liquid Nitrogen Overclocking is still selling Sandy Bridge systems with their hardware solution in place. I don't think you can even get Sandy Bridge systems anywhere else now.
February 2, 2011 11:55:57 AM

mavroxur said:
Um, $250 to repair boards that the manufacturers are replacing for free?


For those who want their boards fixed NOW and not MONTHS FROM NOW.

And it looks like it is $175, which includes return shipping (which is probably from $60 to $80 depending on the size of your system and the shipping container).

Some people might need all of their SATA II ports, and this is apparently the only solution for them.

Liquid Nitrogen Overclocking is the only company still selling Sandy Bridge systems right now, and their 5.0 GHz computers are the fastest you can get anywhere.

a c 207 Ĉ ASUS
a b K Overclocking
a b å Intel
a c 716 V Motherboard
February 2, 2011 1:55:30 PM

solidliquid said:
... has announced a hardware solution for all of those plagued by the Intel P67 motherboards' SATA II bug. News of Intel's intended massive recall of approximately 8 million motherboards spread at the end of January, and on February 1, 2011, LNO made their announcement public...

I don't want to be the one to get you banned from Tom's but enough! :fou: 

I get Google pointing!

Go sell your Snake Oil somewhere else! - Go Away!!! :hello: 
February 2, 2011 2:07:47 PM

jaquith said:


Go sell your Snake Oil somewhere else! - Go Away!!! :hello: 


You didn't say what size Snake Oil bottle you wanted.

Can I interest you in a medium?

:) 
a b V Motherboard
February 2, 2011 6:54:36 PM

solidliquid said:
For those who want their boards fixed NOW and not MONTHS FROM NOW.

And it looks like it is $175, which includes return shipping (which is probably from $60 to $80 depending on the size of your system and the shipping container).

Some people might need all of their SATA II ports, and this is apparently the only solution for them.

Liquid Nitrogen Overclocking is the only company still selling Sandy Bridge systems right now, and their 5.0 GHz computers are the fastest you can get anywhere.





You know they're actually not repairing the problem, right? It's a work-around. The only "repair" would be to replace the P67 chipset with a revised one that doesn't have the problem. This company isn't reworking motherboards and replacing chipsets, i'm sure of that. You want to know why? Because Intel hasn't shipped any revised chips yet! So how could they be replacing bad P67's if the good ones havent shipped yet? All they're doing is either A) undervolting the PCH or B) providing better cooling for the PCH. It's a crutch at best. The problem is internal to the PCH and can be mitigated with either of those two methods. The only way to *fix* it would be to replace it.
a b V Motherboard
February 2, 2011 7:06:42 PM

Intel estimated 5% to 15% failure rate over three years, right?

So: Send me your motherboard and $175. I will send it back to you. If the SATA ports fail within 1 year, I will honor my guarantee and refund your money.

Notice that I didn't do anything with the board, but I would still make money on this scheme.

Please note that I have very carefully not suggested that LNO is working on this business model, just floating an idea.
a c 207 Ĉ ASUS
a b K Overclocking
a b å Intel
a c 716 V Motherboard
February 2, 2011 7:31:45 PM

It's "For $250 it can fix any motherboard" ; for that I'll send you a brand new one -- collect $250 for putting it in the mail to ASUS/GA/MSI/Etc. Plus as an added 'Bonus' extend your warranty, and only charge you a mere $75 during the warranty period for a 'handling fee' ;) 

BTW - I'm backlogged until March/April so HURRY UP!!!
February 3, 2011 12:14:10 AM

mavroxur said:
You know they're actually not repairing the problem, right? It's a work-around. The only "repair" would be to replace the P67 chipset with a revised one that doesn't have the problem. This company isn't reworking motherboards and replacing chipsets, i'm sure of that. You want to know why? Because Intel hasn't shipped any revised chips yet! So how could they be replacing bad P67's if the good ones havent shipped yet? All they're doing is either A) undervolting the PCH or B) providing better cooling for the PCH. It's a crutch at best. The problem is internal to the PCH and can be mitigated with either of those two methods. The only way to *fix* it would be to replace it.


I emailed them and asked them to elaborate on their hardware solution.

The are installing a board with ports for you to plug your SATA II devices into.

Maybe instead of hurling generalizations at a company that is obviously working to solve a problem, you could have done the same thing and gotten to the truth of the matter.
February 3, 2011 12:18:11 AM

jaquith said:
It's "For $250 it can fix any motherboard" ; for that I'll send you a brand new one -- collect $250 for putting it in the mail to ASUS/GA/MSI/Etc. Plus as an added 'Bonus' extend your warranty, and only charge you a mere $75 during the warranty period for a 'handling fee' ;) 

BTW - I'm backlogged until March/April so HURRY UP!!!


It's $175, not $250.

At least $60 of that has to be for the return shipping, which they agree to cover.

That puts the cost at $115.

The board must cost money to build.

Someone has to install it, someone that actually gets paid. Therefore, they need to cover this cost.

That must take time, and they must have already spent considerable money on it.

I would guess their profit margin is pretty lean on this one, wouldn't you?

So why throw stones at someone who is helping the Sandy Bridge customers?
a b V Motherboard
February 3, 2011 2:10:32 AM

solidliquid said:
I emailed them and asked them to elaborate on their hardware solution.

The are installing a board with ports for you to plug your SATA II devices into.

Maybe instead of hurling generalizations at a company that is obviously working to solve a problem, you could have done the same thing and gotten to the truth of the matter.


solidliquid said:
It's $175, not $250.

At least $60 of that has to be for the return shipping, which they agree to cover.

That puts the cost at $115.

The board must cost money to build.

Someone has to install it, someone that actually gets paid. Therefore, they need to cover this cost.

That must take time, and they must have already spent considerable money on it.

I would guess their profit margin is pretty lean on this one, wouldn't you?

So why throw stones at someone who is helping the Sandy Bridge customers?

They'll be paying something like $20 or less for the board, so their profit margin will be more like 400%-500%. Not very low at all, actually more like very high.

BTW, I hope you have their permission to use their photo as your avatar.
February 3, 2011 2:15:16 AM

PreferLinux said:
They'll be paying something like $20 or less for the board, so their profit margin will be more like 400%-500%. Not very low at all, actually more like very high.


So their custom-made hardware board cost them $0?

Wow, you really are a genius.
a b V Motherboard
February 3, 2011 2:36:59 AM

SolidLiquid must work on commission. He's nothing short of a white knight for them. They're a con artist company, charging a con artist fee.


/thread

a b V Motherboard
February 3, 2011 2:47:53 AM

solidliquid said:
So their custom-made hardware board cost them $0?

Wow, you really are a genius.

Where do you get $0? I never said that. And custom made? That is the biggest and stupidest joke of the century. It would be a standard board that anyone can buy, and the cheapest one available at that. Anyone who thinks it is a custom made board must have loose rocks in their head.
a b K Overclocking
February 3, 2011 9:17:24 AM

Your advertising is not appreciated. I suggest you cease if you want to keep posting on this forum. Also I hate to break it to you but every one of your links are No-Follow, so filling every thread you post in with links is not going to provide you with any notable backlinking benefits.
February 5, 2011 1:58:01 PM

PreferLinux said:
Where do you get $0? I never said that. And custom made? That is the biggest and stupidest joke of the century. It would be a standard board that anyone can buy, and the cheapest one available at that. Anyone who thinks it is a custom made board must have loose rocks in their head.


Why don't you tell us how you computed your "profit margin" calculation. Starting with the $175 fee mentioned.
February 5, 2011 2:00:52 PM

randomizer said:
Also I hate to break it to you but every one of your links are No-Follow, so filling every thread you post in with links is not going to provide you with any notable backlinking benefits.


I have no idea what you are talking about.

I posted an announcement, no different than any other announcement that has been made regarding a product recall.

A company has a hardware solution in place for those who need access to all of their ports, NOW, not months from now.

A solution is a solution is a solution.

If you want a component-level hardware repair done for free, wait for the Intel fix.

Of course, by then, the Ivy Bridge will be just about coming out, and you will be able to overclock them to 5.8 or 5.9 GHz on air.
a b V Motherboard
February 5, 2011 4:44:10 PM

solidliquid said:

A company has a hardware solution in place for those who need access to all of their ports, NOW, not months from now.

A solution is a solution is a solution.

If you want a component-level hardware repair done for free, wait for the Intel fix.




And the company you're pushing apparently doesn't even do a hardware fix, they just give you a PCI-e SATA controller for $175, according to your earlier post. If they modded the board in any way, shape, or form it would be half-way acceptable (not really, it's still a ripoff), but sending you a board back with some cheap-o pcie to sata board is rubbish.
a b K Overclocking
February 6, 2011 4:01:56 AM

solidliquid said:
I have no idea what you are talking about.

Then you better get an idea of what I'm talking about. Posting announcements does not require 2-3 links to your website in the same post. I've checked your post history and a large percentage point to that site. It's advertising and it's not acceptable. You can throw excuses around all you want but that doesn't change anything.
a b V Motherboard
February 6, 2011 5:21:50 PM

solidliquid said:
Why don't you tell us how you computed your "profit margin" calculation. Starting with the $175 fee mentioned.

Why don't you use your brain?
February 8, 2011 5:39:55 PM

mavroxur said:
And the company you're pushing apparently doesn't even do a hardware fix, they just give you a PCI-e SATA controller for $175, according to your earlier post. If they modded the board in any way, shape, or form it would be half-way acceptable (not really, it's still a ripoff), but sending you a board back with some cheap-o pcie to sata board is rubbish.


Well, it looks like even Intel is going with this recommendation now -- using a PCI to supplement their defective motherboard.

http://news.cnet.com/8301-17938_105-20030936-1.html

So send me a bcc of your email to Intel, telling them that it is rubbish. Will you do that for me?
a b V Motherboard
February 8, 2011 6:52:46 PM

solidliquid said:
Well, it looks like even Intel is going with this recommendation now -- using a PCI to supplement their defective motherboard.

http://news.cnet.com/8301-17938_105-20030936-1.html

So send me a bcc of your email to Intel, telling them that it is rubbish. Will you do that for me?





The only difference is that Intel isn't charging you $175 for the expansion card, like the company you keep pushing as being the best thing since sliced bread.
a c 207 Ĉ ASUS
a b K Overclocking
a b å Intel
a c 716 V Motherboard
February 8, 2011 7:07:17 PM

LET THIS POST DIE!!!
February 8, 2011 7:10:11 PM

mavroxur said:
The only difference is that Intel isn't charging you $175 for the expansion card, like the company you keep pushing as being the best thing since sliced bread.


I am not "pushing" anything. And it's not $175 for the expansion card.

It's $175 to open the box that it's shipped it, take apart the unit, purchase the card, install the card, connect the proper SATA II and III connections as needed, test the unit, re-assemble the unit, re-package the unit, and ship it back to the customer.

Figure $60 to $80 for shipping, figure $60 for the card, that's $120 to $140 there, so a paultry $35 to $55 labor charge is a drop in the bucket.

a b V Motherboard
February 9, 2011 4:54:59 AM

solidliquid said:
I am not "pushing" anything. And it's not $175 for the expansion card.

It's $175 to open the box that it's shipped it, take apart the unit, purchase the card, install the card, connect the proper SATA II and III connections as needed, test the unit, re-assemble the unit, re-package the unit, and ship it back to the customer.

Figure $60 to $80 for shipping, figure $60 for the card, that's $120 to $140 there, so a paultry $35 to $55 labor charge is a drop in the bucket.




Sooooooo maybe i'm missing something, but that seems like a lot of steps to send the customer their motherboard back with a pci-e to sata card. A $20 card for $175? No matter how much glitter and diamonds you put on bullshit, it's still bullshit.


February 9, 2011 12:03:45 PM

mavroxur said:
Sooooooo maybe i'm missing something, but that seems like a lot of steps to send the customer their motherboard back with a pci-e to sata card. A $20 card for $175? No matter how much glitter and diamonds you put on bullshit, it's still bullshit.


Where do you get your $20 card estimate from?

I said $60 for the card, not $20 for the card.

The shipping cost had the $20 spread, from $60 to $80, depending on the weight of the fully assembled system and how far it was shipped.

So, Einstein, $60 to $80 + $60 for the card would mean a sum of $120 (in the case of $60 + $60) to $140 (for $80 + $60).

The company performing the installation must pay for the return shipping and the card.

Now, genius, we take $175 and then subtract $140, and you get $35 in that case. See how that works? It's called math.

Now you try it.

Take $175, then subtract $120, and you get $55. See how that works?

Bear in mind, from this $35 to $55 service fee, you still have to pay the technician for their time.

So, you see, there's not much profit being made, is there? It's more of a service to people who are already out of luck and need all of their SATA II ports.

And, since Intel is now recommending the same exact solution, I guess that means your claim of it being b.s. sounds a little idiotic, does it not?

You don't need to answer. You're wrong, and you will only continue posting to demonstrate how much of a gadfly you really are.
a b V Motherboard
February 9, 2011 5:52:32 PM

What idiot would think you need to pay $60-$80 for shipping??? Here, I could send it anywhere in the country for $25 both ways.
a b V Motherboard
February 9, 2011 6:03:12 PM

solidliquid said:
Where do you get your $20 card estimate from?

I said $60 for the card, not $20 for the card.

The shipping cost had the $20 spread, from $60 to $80, depending on the weight of the fully assembled system and how far it was shipped.

So, Einstein, $60 to $80 + $60 for the card would mean a sum of $120 (in the case of $60 + $60) to $140 (for $80 + $60).

The company performing the installation must pay for the return shipping and the card.

Now, genius, we take $175 and then subtract $140, and you get $35 in that case. See how that works? It's called math.

Now you try it.

Take $175, then subtract $120, and you get $55. See how that works?

Bear in mind, from this $35 to $55 service fee, you still have to pay the technician for their time.

So, you see, there's not much profit being made, is there? It's more of a service to people who are already out of luck and need all of their SATA II ports.

And, since Intel is now recommending the same exact solution, I guess that means your claim of it being b.s. sounds a little idiotic, does it not?

You don't need to answer. You're wrong, and you will only continue posting to demonstrate how much of a gadfly you really are.








What "installation" is required with a PCI-e SATA card? You send them your motherboard, they send you back your board, packaged with a PCI-e SATA card. They can't "install" it because your board isn't even in a system. They are scam artists. They just ship you a cheap-o SATA card, pretend they saved you, charge you out the ass because you are an idiot, and tell you to have a nice day. You can plug in random numbers for shipping, handling, consulting, installation, technical time, services fees, gratuity, tags, tax, title, license, permit fee, waste disposal fee, core charge, bridal registry fee, and whatever other fees I left out, but it's still a ripoff.



a b K Overclocking
February 10, 2011 12:16:34 AM

This thread has long outlived its usefulness.
!