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[Help] Need advice on timing and speed

Last response: in Memory
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February 3, 2011 12:09:45 AM

Hey, I had 4 gigs of ddr2 pc 6400 running at 6-6-6-18 400mhz and want to upgrade to 4 more gigs.

So I bought 4 gigs that run at 5-5-5-15 @ 400mhz

The problem is, my old ram supports 5-5-5-15 timing but at a lower frequency (333mhz) so now I'm running at 5-5-5-15 @ 333mhz instead of 400mhz which the new ram supports

So, my question is should I return this ram and get ram that basically is the same as my old to get 6-6-6-18 @ 400mhz or keep what I have which is 5-5-5-15 @ 333mhz


Also, I am over clocking but not by a lot (the numbers I'm giving you are stock numbers).

More about : advice timing speed

a c 251 } Memory
February 3, 2011 9:56:52 PM

I would run the ram at 6-6-6-18 400MHz which your slower ram is. The new ram should not have issues with that. Then a difference in those ram speeds is minimal and since you are overclocking so your ram speed is probably more than 333MHz you might have a stable setting as is with good timings.
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February 4, 2011 4:18:08 AM

Windows 7, right?
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February 5, 2011 1:56:06 AM

rolli59 said:
I would run the ram at 6-6-6-18 400MHz which your slower ram is. The new ram should not have issues with that. Then a difference in those ram speeds is minimal and since you are overclocking so your ram speed is probably more than 333MHz you might have a stable setting as is with good timings.


So wait, you got me a little confused, are you telling me to change my timings on my new ram to match my old ram timings to get 400mhz? Or saying since I'm overclocking to just leave it at 5-5-5-15?

Btw I'm getting 384MHz with overclocking


henryvalz said:
Windows 7, right?


Correct
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a c 251 } Memory
February 5, 2011 11:15:44 AM

If it is running stable at 384MHz with the fast timings then I would leave it at that. Ram often has issues with running faster clock than it is spect for and it has issues with running faster timings than the is specified for the speed rating. You are pretty close to the 400MHz and faster timings than the slower ram is advertised for.
If you where running at stock you could have relaxed the timings on the faster ram to match the slower one at 400MHz. (if it was in AUTO for memory in BIOS that is what is supposed to happen)
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February 5, 2011 12:23:24 PM

rolli59 said:
If it is running stable at 384MHz with the fast timings then I would leave it at that. Ram often has issues with running faster clock than it is spect for and it has issues with running faster timings than the is specified for the speed rating. You are pretty close to the 400MHz and faster timings than the slower ram is advertised for.
If you where running at stock you could have relaxed the timings on the faster ram to match the slower one at 400MHz. (if it was in AUTO for memory in BIOS that is what is supposed to happen)





Hmmm, alright. But what if I were to take back the new ram to match my old ram's timings to get 400MHz stock, and OC to about 470MHz

Would it be worth it? Or is 5-5-5-15 @ 384MHz better than 6-6-6-18 @ 470MHz?
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a c 251 } Memory
February 5, 2011 12:27:38 PM

the 6-6-6-18@470 would be faster but there is no guaranty that the ram would stay stable that much over its rated speed, you might have to relax timings further.
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a c 347 } Memory
February 5, 2011 4:07:11 PM

Mixing RAM is generally not a good idea; the following is the recommended Frequency & CAS timings:

400 MHz 6-6-6-18 - OLD
400 MHz 5-5-5-15 - NEW
=================
400 MHz 6-6-6-18 - COMBO ; the only concern is voltage which needs to be the same. Running the combined at the lower {faster} CAS is not recommended and might cause errors.

In any case, after modifying the CAS and Frequencies in the BIOS I strongly recommend running 4-passes of Memtest. Create a bootable CD/DVD {ISO/zip} http://www.memtest.org

If you produce errors then exchange the new RAM for 'matching': Frequency, CAS, Voltage & Type. Ideally, is another set from the same RAM Mfg & same part-number if possible.
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