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INTERNET CONNECTION!!!

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  • Connection
  • Internet Connection
  • Networking
  • Product
Last response: in Networking
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February 26, 2010 11:49:28 AM

Frustrated as all hell because, as a current IT student - I SHOULD know how to troubleshoot this one, please help:

Can't connect to the internet at home. It's a machine I bring to school with me and I can connect fine with that via the school's gateway and manually assigning it an IP address.

At home - nothing. I have a wireless router connected to the computer with a modem. I've changed the TCP/IP settings to obtain the necessary addresses automatically.

I've pinged the loopback address and all is well there. I've ipconfigged (it's a word) and everything looks good there.

My firefox settings are on 'auto detect proxy settings.'

The LAN and wireless connections are 'connected and firewalled' but not receiving a whole hell of a lot of packets.

I recently tried to install the Linksys wireless adapter and that's when I started having real issues. I'd like to have it wirless just because I have 2 Mac laptops and and old Dell that use its connection. (er, at one time did....)

What's the best approach for me here? I could just use the LAN and use the hardwire connection, but then how would I access the internet on the other machines?

I appreciate any help and thanks very much, in advance.

More about : internet connection

February 26, 2010 12:26:23 PM

Go to a command window and run ipconfig, report the results.
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February 26, 2010 12:36:34 PM

Clarify your setup - is this right?

ISP <---> modem (cable modem?) <----> PC <-----> wireless router

and you're trying to connect to the wireless router? It sounds like you're trying both wired and wireless, pick one.

How are you getting IP settings onto the laptop - DHCP, manual, something else?

You need to troubleshoot 1 step at a time. Can you connect to the router? Is the PC routing/sharing the internet connection?
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Related resources
February 26, 2010 12:52:25 PM

Ethernet adapter Local Area Connection 5
Media state........: media disconnected

Ethernet adapter Local Area Connection 4:
Conenction- specific DNX Suffix : hsd1.ma.comcast.net.
IP Addres :192.168.1.101
Subnet Mask : 255.255.255.0
Default Gateway : 192.168.1.1



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February 26, 2010 1:03:17 PM

eibgrad said:
Go to a command window and run ipconfig, report the results.



Ethernet adapter Local Area Connection 5
Media state........: media disconnected

Ethernet adapter Local Area Connection 4:
Conenction- specific DNX Suffix : hsd1.ma.comcast.net.
IP Addres :192.168.1.101
Subnet Mask : 255.255.255.0
Default Gateway : 192.168.1.1
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February 26, 2010 1:27:35 PM

gtvr said:
Clarify your setup - is this right?

ISP <---> modem (cable modem?) <----> PC <-----> wireless router

and you're trying to connect to the wireless router? It sounds like you're trying both wired and wireless, pick one.

How are you getting IP settings onto the laptop - DHCP, manual, something else?

You need to troubleshoot 1 step at a time. Can you connect to the router? Is the PC routing/sharing the internet connection?


(sorry, that other post was in response to another member)

YES, that is the correct setup and it is a cable modem.
I'd prefer to do wireless so that my other machines can connect.
IP settings on laptop are DHCP - I believe. I'm not at the actual laptop.
Router is on and working and I am able to connect to its interface by typing the old 192.168.1.1 in the address bar
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February 26, 2010 1:32:44 PM

SCSI Folk said:
Ethernet adapter Local Area Connection 5
Media state........: media disconnected

Ethernet adapter Local Area Connection 4:
Conenction- specific DNX Suffix : hsd1.ma.comcast.net.
IP Addres :192.168.1.101
Subnet Mask : 255.255.255.0
Default Gateway : 192.168.1.1



This appears to be the wired connection (and looks right). I thought that connection worked and you were having problems w/ a wireless adapter?

As gtvr stated, you need to be PRECISE in how devices are connected, for example:

[cable/dsl modem](lan)<--wire-->(wan)[wireless router](lan)<--wire-->(lan)[pc]

The above is a typical wired internet connection from a pc to the Internet via a router

We need to know if there's anything about you setup that is significantly different, some intervening device perhaps we're not seeing, etc.
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February 26, 2010 1:35:42 PM

SCSI Folk said:
(sorry, that other post was in response to another member)

YES, that is the correct setup and it is a cable modem.
I'd prefer to do wireless so that my other machines can connect.
IP settings on laptop are DHCP - I believe. I'm not at the actual laptop.
Router is on and working and I am able to connect to its interface by typing the old 192.168.1.1 in the address bar


ISP <---> modem (cable modem?) <----> PC <-----> wireless router

If that's correct, why isn't the router connected to the modem and everyone accessing the Internet via the router??

As in:

ISP<--->cable modem<----> wireless router<-----> PC
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February 26, 2010 1:50:03 PM

eibgrad said:
This appears to be the wired connection (and looks right). I thought that connection worked and you were having problems w/ a wireless adapter?

As gtvr stated, you need to be PRECISE in how devices are connected, for example:

[cable/dsl modem](lan)<--wire-->(wan)[wireless router](lan)<--wire-->(lan)[pc]

The above is a typical wired internet connection from a pc to the Internet via a router

We need to know if there's anything about you setup that is significantly different, some intervening device perhaps we're not seeing, etc.


The router is connected to the modem & PC
And obviously, the phone and cable are coming into the modem.
I do have the USB connected Linksys wireless adapter. But nothing out of the ordinary.

I have no connection right now. I'm about to ask a dumb question, so please go easy on me...while I would prefer the LAN because of its somewhat faster connections, speeds...I do have other machines that used that wireless router to connect to the internet. If I'm using LAN on that machine, there' no way the my other computers can pick up internet connection via my router, right? (that was the dumb question)

Could it be physical? the RJ 45 connectors, the router itself? when I click on Open Available Networks, they look good. They say 'connected, firewalled...etc' The TCP/IP settings look OK.

Again, I'm not home, maybe if I were sitting in front of it I could answer your questions better.

Thanks.
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February 26, 2010 1:58:53 PM

SCSI Folk said:
The router is connected to the modem & PC
And obviously, the phone and cable are coming into the modem.
I do have the USB connected Linksys wireless adapter. But nothing out of the ordinary.

I have no connection right now. I'm about to ask a dumb question, so please go easy on me...while I would prefer the LAN because of its somewhat faster connections, speeds...I do have other machines that used that wireless router to connect to the internet. If I'm using LAN on that machine, there' no way the my other computers can pick up internet connection via my router, right? (that was the dumb question)

Could it be physical? the RJ 45 connectors, the router itself? when I click on Open Available Networks, they look good. They say 'connected, firewalled...etc' The TCP/IP settings look OK.

Again, I'm not home, maybe if I were sitting in front of it I could answer your questions better.

Thanks.


ISP<--->cable modem<----> wireless router<-----> PCs/laptops (wired and wireless)

If the above is how you are connected, then you CAN use wired and wireless at the same time, not an issue.
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February 26, 2010 2:01:01 PM

OK, then what am I doing wrong, since I can't connect using either?!
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February 26, 2010 2:04:34 PM

SCSI Folk said:
OK, then what am I doing wrong, since I can't connect using either?!


You've replied in the affirmative when asked about two different configurations:

ISP<--->cable modem<---->wireless router<-----> PC

ISP<--->cable modem<---->PC<-----> wireless router

These are completely different! You can't possibly have BOTH configurations at the same time. 99.99% of ppl are using the first configuration.

So until you tell use DEFINITIVELY which is the one you're using, we can't solve the problem.
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February 26, 2010 2:11:14 PM

Sorry for the confusion. Since I've begun taking classes, I have more questions about things and have become more curious and until recently - thought I was grasping things! (which is probably why I'm taking Networking + again)

Anyway,
I have been using the 1st one:
ISP<--->cable modem<---->wireless router<-----> PC

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February 26, 2010 2:19:47 PM

SCSI Folk said:
Sorry for the confusion. Since I've begun taking classes, I have more questions about things and have become more curious and until recently - thought I was grasping things! (which is probably why I'm taking Networking + again)

Anyway,
I have been using the 1st one:
ISP<--->cable modem<---->wireless router<-----> PC


Great. Now to clarify a couple other things:

1. When your PC is connected via wire to the router, does it work or not?

2. When your PC is connected via wireless to the router, does it work or not?
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February 26, 2010 2:23:17 PM

No and no.
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February 26, 2010 2:25:36 PM

SCSI Folk said:
No and no.


Using a wired connection from the PC to the router, use ipconfig /all and report the results.
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February 26, 2010 2:34:32 PM

I can't right now. I'm not home. I'll definitely try it later.
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February 26, 2010 2:37:57 PM

SCSI Folk said:
I can't right now. I'm not home. I'll definitely try it later.



OK. Once you've done that, then connect the PC by wire directly to the modem (bypassing the wireless router), reboot the modem, try to establish the network connection again, run ipconfig /all, and post the results (obscure the last couple nodes of the public IP address if you like).

NOTE: Sometimes the modem won’t immediately UNBIND the MAC address of the router, so it may take a few minutes and perhaps several reboots of the modem before it allows the PC’s MAC address to be bound instead.
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February 26, 2010 3:10:20 PM

Claiming more ignorance here: how would I reboot the modem when I do it?

Is it just unplugging, wait, plug it back in or is there a 'reset' button?

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February 26, 2010 3:36:28 PM

SCSI Folk said:
Claiming more ignorance here: how would I reboot the modem when I do it?

Is it just unplugging, wait, plug it back in or is there a 'reset' button?


Pulling the power plug is just fine. Just wait for 60 secs or so then plug it back in.
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February 26, 2010 4:05:03 PM

First thing I would do actually, is find out if you can connect from the PC (wired) to the router. You have an IP address assigned to connection 4.

open your browser, go to http://192.168.1.1 - this is your router. See if you get a page (probably will ask for admin logon). If you can get to your router, but not the internet, it's probably an issue with the router config (or your ISP connection)
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February 26, 2010 4:10:22 PM

gtvr said:
First thing I would do actually, is find out if you can connect from the PC (wired) to the router. You have an IP address assigned to connection 4.

open your browser, go to http://192.168.1.1 - this is your router. See if you get a page (probably will ask for admin logon). If you can get to your router, but not the internet, it's probably an issue with the router config (or your ISP connection)



To be honest; when I learned how to do MAC filtering and turn off broadcasting, etc. and started playing with the router config, that's when I started having issues. First it was the laptop that wouldn't connect to the router. I did try that this past Sunday and I was able to gain access to the router interface.

If that's the case, how should I config the router?
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Best solution

February 26, 2010 4:22:05 PM

If you CAN get to the router interface, clear out all filtering. Heck, try reset to defaults if you're not sure what you've done. Start with broadcasting SSID, no encryption, etc for wireless, see if you can make it work that way. Or, focus on the wired connection first. Just get it working at a minimal level, if possible.

THEN worry about not broadcasting SSID, see if it works. Add encryption, see if it works. Try one thing at a time, and reverse it or dig deeper if that causes problems.
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February 27, 2010 7:25:43 AM

gtvr has it right but, if I may try to be of some help?

please don't take me for arrogant, I just would like to help and also cover all the bases at the same time. I own & run a buisness in wich I specialize in Home and small office networking. I've been in buisness for 4 years and been in the buisness of networking for over 10 years and I think I can help...

do exactly this in this order.

1.) reset the router to the factory defults. I wouldnt worry about the web page on the router just yet. just get a papper clip and bend one end striat so you can push the RESET button on the BACK OF THE ROUTER. They usualy require you to push and hold the button till the lights go out and quickly come back on and let go.. Now you router is back to factory settings. LEAVE IT THAT WAY FOR NOW

2.) Un plug all the hard wires(Ethernet Cables/ R-J45) from everything

3.) Now go to the computer that you plan to have hard wired to the router. Go to the network adapter properties / TCP/IP (TCP/IP 4 IN VISTA OR WIN 7) / properties and make sure that these are the settings:

Obtain IP adress automatically
Obtain DNS server address automatically
(and on the advanced tab)
DHCP should be enabled

4.) Turn your MODEM off, wait a few seconds, turn it back on, let it connect. Now plug an ethernet cable from the computer you where just at to the modem and you should have internet. if you do, proceed to the next step. if not, your problem is in the cable or phone line and you have to troubleshoot that first

5.) Disconnect the cable again and turn off the ROUTER and MODEM. no need to turn off the computer.

6.) run an ethernet cable from your MODEM to the ROUTER. On the router MAKE SURE you plug it in to the port labled "WAN" or "MODEM" or it will just be highlighted diffrent from all the others.


7.) run an ethernet cable from the COMPUTER we worked on to the ROUTER and plug that one into any of the ports labled "LAN" or the ones that are numbered.

8.) turn on the MODEM first and let it connect. Then turn on the ROUTER. your computer should say "Local area connection now connected"

9.) Back to the computer. Open Internet Explorer. it probably will say "Cannot Display webpage" dont sweat it. In internet Exp. go to TOOLS / INTERNET OPTIONS / CONNECTIONS TAB / LAN SETTINGS and check the box that says "automatically detect settings" (nothing else should be checked) click APPLY and close Internet Exp.

10.) Open Internet exp. and type the IP address of thr ROUTER in the address bar. I believe gtvr is correct in that Linksys' defult address is 192.168.1.1 but if not you will be able to find it in the paperwork or CD that came with the router. if you can't get to the router's web page then you have a bad cable ( even if it says your connected!) replace it now.

note: I set up all kinds of diffrent brands of routers/access points as I do this profesionally as a trade skill. Diffirent brands have diffirent links and tabs to configure their routers but they all basically do the same thing so bare with me...


11.) There will be way to set up the connection. we must go there first.

if you have a Cable system then your connection type should be "Dynamic IP" or "DHCP" (even if your cable company provided you with a static IP because your modem handels all of that)

if you have DSL or phone line broadband, setting that up is a little different.
First you have to type the address of the MODEM to access it's web page and set it to "BRIDGED MODE"
Then you can go to the ROUTER'S web page and your connection type will be "PPPoE" it will be a dynamic ip connection also and you will have to enter your Username & Password for your ISP because when you add a router to that system the Router controls how the modem dials out

Wich ever system you use, after you set up your router for that system Click "SAVE AND REBOOT" in the router's webpage and when the router reboots your connection should be good to go.

OH, adn P.S. There really is no need to hide or not broadcast you SSID. All that does is make it hard for you to connect your computers. If your concern is Security... I can hack your network from your street curb weather you broadcast it or not. As long as you have a good firewall and you have WPA Personal or better security with a good password you should be fine. I could hack that too but it would take entirely too long and too much thinking. A hacker would just move on to the dummy down the street who has a wireless router and doesn't know how to even create a password on it or he has WEP security...
anyways good luck man hpoe that solves it. Ill check back too see if it did
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March 1, 2010 12:12:41 PM

106241,24,512164 said:
gtvr has it right but, if I may try to be of some help?

please don't take me for arrogant, I just would like to help and also cover all the bases at the same time. I own & run a buisness in wich I specialize in Home and small office networking. I've been in buisness for 4 years and been in the buisness of networking for over 10 years and I think I can help...

"arrogant"? well...no, not at all. that just tells me you know what you're doing.

i actually did that saturday night before i saw your reply. everything does work fine now. i was able to get on to the router interface using 192.168.1.1.

so for the best possible security use WPA? when you say "use a good password", for what exactly? you don't necessarily mean a good password for the router, do you?

i hope you're one of the good guys: you got me worried when you say you can "hack into this..." and "hack into that..."!!

thanks for the help.
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March 1, 2010 12:14:55 PM

gtvr said:
If you CAN get to the router interface, clear out all filtering. Heck, try reset to defaults if you're not sure what you've done. Start with broadcasting SSID, no encryption, etc for wireless, see if you can make it work that way. Or, focus on the wired connection first. Just get it working at a minimal level, if possible.

THEN worry about not broadcasting SSID, see if it works. Add encryption, see if it works. Try one thing at a time, and reverse it or dig deeper if that causes problems.



i'm in. thanks for the advice. i actually reset the router saturday night, and followed your instructions doing one thing at a time.
for a small wireless home network, how do you suggest i configure my settings for the best possible security?

thanks.

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March 1, 2010 5:15:21 PM

Make sure you can not manage the router from the WAN port, only LAN. Yes, set a decent pwd for the router anyways.

For wireless settings, you can probably google all kinds of good guides, but I'd say don't broadcast SSID, and use encryption (WPA with a decent passphrase - doesn't need to be memorable because you're not typing it in each time). Use some characters, numbers, etc - write it down someplace secure, if you have to. jk*^6i43589nJL543kdda - something completely random. To be more specific, it'd depend on what encryption your router & laptop support.
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March 2, 2010 1:03:04 PM

Yes, Im glad you caught that gtvr. It is verry important that you set the router so that you can only manage it from the LAN side of your network.

and yes I am totaly one of the good guys. It is very crucial in my buisness that I know how to hack systems and networks and get pass firewalls in order to set up the proper security configurations for my clients. thats all! I don't go around hacking into peoples stuff.

also, I didn't mean to be missleading when I said you don't have too hide the SSID broadcast. It does add a level of security. what I simply meant was that it still would be secure if you did "assuming that you did set up at least a WPA personal encryption and ALSO that you had at least the the defult Linksys firewall turned on as well."

sorry gtvr, wasn't trying to under mind your advice
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March 2, 2010 1:14:09 PM

of course. i understand, in fact when i take my security classes, they'll more or less 'teach' us how to hack just for thoses reason you mentioned.

but i did mean to ask, how you would you set your router so that you can manage it only from the LAN? are there other not so secure ways?

thanks again.
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March 2, 2010 5:13:59 PM

jrock - I never considered that you were trying to cause any problems. You've posted some stuff I missed, as well.

SCSI - "how you would you set your router so that you can manage it only from the LAN?" - should be one of the settings on your router, when you go to the web management pages. Not sure if that's what you're asking.

"are there other not so secure ways?" - sure. You could allow it to be managed from the WAN port. That means, if you accessed that IP address (it's a pubilc IP on the WAN side) it would pop up and ask for your username/pwd. If someone guessed it, or found some vulnerability, then they could do all kinds of bad stuff to it.

You can do some things like change the port it listens on, rather than shut it off, but that's called "security through obscurity" and generally insufficient. It would just depend on which ports someone was scanning if they found it.
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March 3, 2010 3:50:50 AM

Please Note: not all linksys routers have the option to manage it from the outside WAN port. If you don't then don't worry about it. you cant. but, moast do so it will usualy be a check box labeled somthing like
"enable WAN or REMOTE MANAGEMENT" naturally, you would have to uncheck the box to disable it....
It probly is already dissabled as a defult setting being that you reset the router to defult.

I would just try to find it just to make sure it is dissabled

If I knew your MODEL # I could give you exact directions to it.

Linksys has an exact simulation of every models web utility on their website so I would be able to go and look at your web utility and go through all the settings and tell you how to configure it.

save you some time and trouble
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March 4, 2010 11:09:35 AM

gtvr said:
jrock - I never considered that you were trying to cause any problems. You've posted some stuff I missed, as well.

SCSI - "how you would you set your router so that you can manage it only from the LAN?" - should be one of the settings on your router, when you go to the web management pages. Not sure if that's what you're asking.

"are there other not so secure ways?" - sure. You could allow it to be managed from the WAN port. That means, if you accessed that IP address (it's a pubilc IP on the WAN side) it would pop up and ask for your username/pwd. If someone guessed it, or found some vulnerability, then they could do all kinds of bad stuff to it.

You can do some things like change the port it listens on, rather than shut it off, but that's called "security through obscurity" and generally insufficient. It would just depend on which ports someone was scanning if they found it.


Now I'm just ready to throw the router out the window. Everything was fine over the weekend. Until I connected my machine back up last night (I take it school on Tuesdays and Thursdays). Couldn't get in via the wirless connection at all.
I disconnected the wireless Linksys adapter and I was in via the LAN connection. I'm no expert, but to me that sounds like a hardware issue, no? the router or the adapter? I've had them for 7 years at least. Do you think they might be malfunctioning?
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March 4, 2010 11:55:23 AM

Old laptop, PC card wireless adapter, not built in? That doesn't work, but you can plug the laptop in and it does work?

There's no way to tell from here which one it is, without more info. You said you have Mac laptops that connect - are either of those wireless, and does that still work? Does the laptop work wirelessly anywhere else (maybe a Starbucks or something to test it).
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March 4, 2010 12:16:58 PM

what you don't remember this thread from last week?! how dare you! (kidding).

adapter not built in. laptop can't connect using my connection - i select it, but no page loads (so i grab another unsecured nearby wireless connection and i'm on the 'net that way). but that's neither here nor there and besides, i'd rather use my own.

i've yet to try to plug the laptop in. i'll do that later tonight probably and get back.
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March 5, 2010 1:02:19 PM

laptop can connect when hard wired. i don't think i've ever had the opportunity to try either laptop at any other location that may have WiFi like a Starbuck's.

Linksys interface is now set to WEP key setting ON
broadcasting my SSID (which i've changed from the default, obviously)

as i'm writing this, all seems well now. we'll see when i disconnect this machine tomorrow for class and hook it back up when i get home...
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March 5, 2010 1:08:58 PM

SCSI Folk said:
what you don't remember this thread from last week?! how dare you! (kidding).


I'm getting old, I can't remember what I did 5 minutes ago. :sleep: 

I remember the thread, didn't go back and read the whole thing though.
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March 7, 2010 11:23:08 AM

Sounds like adapter problems to me. If it works when your security is WEP but not WPA then it is OUTDATED! (very very old) You said, 7 years! It's not capable of WPA as that was not established yet. got a laptop I bought in 2005 with a built in card and it will detect my network but IT WILL NOT CONNECT WITH WPA ENCRYPTION! And it is 802.11 b/g compliant.

first thing I would try is:
Go to the card manufacturer's website and see if you can get a firmware update and updated drivers for it and install that.

if it's not supported anymore or you can't then you have two choices:

1. Leave the router set to WEP encryption :kaola:  and deal with the lack of good security.

or

2. Replace the card for a new one wich will have WPA compatiblities and have a secure network again.

Here is a link for a new one with the best price on the web
http://www.geeks.com/details.asp?invtid=DWA-110&cat=NET
P.S. They sell for WIN 2000 or higher but D-Link has full MAC support & drivers for it on there website.
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March 8, 2010 12:49:58 PM

Yes, it is old. And you're right, it doesn't have WPA!

Right now I have my main PC hardwired. 2 laptops that use the wireless connection to get on the interweb. But now I think it's a settings issue because one laptop is connected to my wireless conection, but not the other one (a 4 year old MacBook). I'm using WEP encryption password key and I'm pulling my hair out trying to figure out what's going wrong there.
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March 8, 2010 1:49:33 PM

another question: i can have one PC hardwired using a LAN connection, have the router connected to that PC and 'modem' but still have other machines using its wireless connection, yes?

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March 8, 2010 3:49:03 PM

SCSI Folk said:
another question: i can have one PC hardwired using a LAN connection, have the router connected to that PC and 'modem' but still have other machines using its wireless connection, yes?

Should be no problem. Basically, you're asking about using wired & wireless functionality of the router at the same time?
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March 8, 2010 4:03:14 PM

gtvr said:
Should be no problem. Basically, you're asking about using wired & wireless functionality of the router at the same time?


Exactly. For some dumb reason, all this time, I was using my main PC via a wireless connection with a wireless adapter. Considering that connection had always been hard wired until I started getting other computers for the home over the years, I should just use the LAN connection for my 'main computer'.

Anyway, the LAN connection is working great, I'm on the internet, but only 1 of my 2 laptops are connecting using the wireless connection. I've changed my SSID, enabled broadcasting, using MAC filtering, it only has WEP encryption for security (it's an old router) and used the WEP key generator to, well generate the password.

Since I can connect with one laptop, would that mean it's a matter of configuring the other laptop's settings accurately?

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March 9, 2010 11:36:10 AM

I think we've discussed whether its settings or something broken. Did you try removing ALL restrictions - including encryption?

Are you sure the network type is compatible (that is, 802.11g for all devices)?
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March 9, 2010 11:47:26 AM

gtvr said:
I think we've discussed whether its settings or something broken. Did you try removing ALL restrictions - including encryption?

Are you sure the network type is compatible (that is, 802.11g for all devices)?



We did discuss how to approach it earlier and that worked just fine.

I realized what I was doing: I enabled MAC filtering, but didn't check the box next to the MAC address of that particular laptop I had entered. I checked it, saved the settings and almost immediately I was online with the laptop.


I think I'm good. Hopefully next time I'm on this forum it's to help someone else out.

Thanks again for all your help.

Talk to further on, down the road.
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March 16, 2010 12:17:28 PM

Best answer selected by SCSI Folk.
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