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How much gb will i use to listen to a 2 hour radio show on the internet

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February 26, 2010 3:57:49 PM

I want to listen to a football match, and I think it will be for about 3 hours, what with all the build up and the autopsy afterwards of the match, how much in GB will I use to do this. The radio station is in the UK.

Thanks Steve.
February 26, 2010 5:43:59 PM

Depends on the bitrate (32kbps, 64kbps, 128kbps, etc.).

Let's assume 64kbps,

64,000 (bits per second) x 10,800 secs = 691,200,000 total bits / 8 (bits per byte) = 86,400,000 total bytes = 86MB = 0.086GB

NOTE: One kb is actually 1024 bits, but I rounded to 1000 bits for simplicity/clarity sake.
February 26, 2010 6:10:33 PM

Do you have a data cap? A quick calculation shows that 3 hours of audio will take
20.52 MiB @ 16kbs
41.03 MiB @ 32kbs
82.06 MiB @ 64kbs
164.12MiB @ 128kbs

edit: sorry, corrected the wrong way. These are now corrected for what your file manager will show.
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February 26, 2010 6:21:30 PM

Actually, 1 kb is 1000 bits, 1 kib is 1024 bits, 1kB is 1000 bytes, 1 kiB is 1024 bytes, which is what your file manager shows. This is even more confusing than conventional v physical current in schematics.
February 26, 2010 6:50:10 PM

elel said:
Actually, 1 kb is 1000 bits, 1 kib is 1024 bits, 1kB is 1000 bytes, 1 kiB is 1024 bytes, which is what your file manager shows. This is even more confusing than conventional v physical current in schematics.


The problem is, no one abides by any of these standards with any consistency (just ask Western Digital or Seagate). So to say 1kb *is* 1000 bits is pretty much meaningless. I assure you the use of 64kbps (which is common terminology in Internet radio, whether you or I agree with it) is NOT based on 1000, but 1024. In the real world, it's more important to understand what it *does* means in the current context than what it *should* mean (imo). The latter is a losing battle.

And here I was, adding clarification to my original post knowing that if I didn’t, someone would point out my “error”, and what happens? I get corrected anyway! :lol: 
February 27, 2010 2:58:37 AM

eibgrad said:
Depends on the bitrate (32kbps, 64kbps, 128kbps, etc.).

Let's assume 64kbps,

64,000 (bits per second) x 10,800 secs = 691,200,000 total bits / 8 (bits per byte) = 86,400,000 total bytes = 86MB = 0.086GB

NOTE: One kb is actually 1024 bits, but I rounded to 1000 bits for simplicity/clarity sake.


Thanks a lot I can now listen to Leeds United's matches on BBC radio Leeds

Cheers

Steve.
!