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Cat5 connector hookup

Last response: in Networking
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February 27, 2010 4:31:01 PM

Ok, so if the hookups are the same for each end of the cable, why the crossover of the wires? They are still one-for-one, unlike Rs-232 where you cross send and receive at one end

More about : cat5 connector hookup

February 27, 2010 6:06:18 PM

Thanks Grumpy, but I didn't want to know how the cable was made. About all I got from the article was twisted pairs and crosstalk, which I knew, except for at the connector. If I assume the only reason for breaking out the GRN GRN-WHT pair is for additional crosstalk prevention. I would doubt a few micrometers would do the trick. I am guessing now that this cabling is more like RS-422 in that it is Differential (+/-)

BBQSmoker
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February 27, 2010 6:55:48 PM

Yep that's 422, but it still does not explan the twist or non twist of GRN GRN-WHT between the two EIA standards.
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March 1, 2010 11:06:32 AM

crossover is for talking hub-hub (or switch-switch) - crosses the send/receive. I think you can even do direct PC to PC but I'm not sure.
Straight through is for PC-switch.

Is that what you're asking?
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March 1, 2010 12:20:46 PM

Nope. I am asking why go to the trouble of crossing the GRN GRN-WHT pair in a standrd cable.

Look, in RS232 cable you cross one pair at one end of the cable (just example not actual pin number):

1 Send 2
2 Rec 1

In Eia 568B:

1 to 1 ORG-WHT
2 to 2 ORG
3 to 3 GRN
4 to 4BLU-WHT
5 to 5 BLU
6 to 6 GRN-WHT
7 to 7 BRN
8 to 8 BRN-WHT

One to one with the GRN GRN-WHT pair twisted. Not that it matters, just makes it easier to makeup if it is without that twist. But knowing EIA there must be a reason. Just want to know why.
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March 1, 2010 5:10:10 PM

Maybe I'm missing something, but in your post, and what I'm seeing online, there is no cross of grn / grn-wht

Otherwise, your listing would be

1 to 1 ORG-WHT
2 to 2 ORG
3 to 6 GRN
4 to 4BLU-WHT
5 to 5 BLU
6 to 3 GRN-WHT
7 to 7 BRN
8 to 8 BRN-WHT
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March 1, 2010 5:30:00 PM

If normal segmentation were followed the cabling would be:
(i.e: Each pair would be placed in order)

1 ORG-WHT
2 ORG
3 GRN-WHT
4 GRN
5 BLU-WHT
6 BLU
7 BRN-WHT
8 BRN

Thus GRN and GRN-WHT are out of their order. As I said it really doesn't change anything, I just like to know why things are as they are. Everything I have read leads to keeping noise off, but nothing really states that.

BBQSmoker
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March 1, 2010 5:32:40 PM

In order for a crossover cable to connect two computers for example, you have to cross the send and receive wires so the send wire on one end goes to the receive wire on the other. So in a crossover cable one end is 568A and the other is 568B. Both wiring configs can be used for straight through cables - 568A to 568A or 568B to 568B will both work. It's also best to only use one standard when wiring network ports or you're bound to cause problems in the future.
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March 1, 2010 8:55:35 PM

ok, now I understand what you are asking. It's not really a crossover as the term is used in networking. Maybe "shift" is a better term.
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March 2, 2010 12:22:59 PM

Right it is a term as is used when you make up cables, you "crossover one wire or set of wires to reah another point. LOL!
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