Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

Is windows built-in raid "safest" if hardware fails?

Last response: in Storage
Share
July 8, 2012 3:03:41 AM

I just want to build a mirror (Raid 1) using two hdd's in an external enclosure (using port multiplier card).

My concern is with preserving the data in case of hardware failure. If the enclosure or port multiplier card fails, can I just take one (both) of the hdd's to another win 7 machine and have my data intact? This seems like the most secure raid, though the performance would be poor compared to hardware raid.

I also have the option of using card's built-in raid (fairly certain it's software) or Gigabyte mobo's raid (last resort since I'm currently using AHCI drivers).

Any reason I shouldn't go with windows 7's raid?
July 11, 2012 10:02:32 AM

I'm not sure, but hardware raid is a lot safer when compared to on board raid, so you will probably have a better chance of your card not failing then your motherboard failing.
m
0
l
July 11, 2012 11:47:32 PM

antamo said:
I'm not sure, but hardware raid is a lot safer when compared to on board raid, so you will probably have a better chance of your card not failing then your motherboard failing.

thanks, that's good to know. I'll probably use win raid vs. the card's though.]

Now I'm just wondering if there's a way to make a software raid using drives in an external enclosure that can be moved and recognized when connected to a different computer?
I'm guessing portability is impossible unless the enclosure itself includes hardware raid.
m
0
l
Related resources
July 13, 2012 3:10:11 AM

It would need to be the same "hardware" raid card, which you could take out and place inside another computer and this will allow you to use your data, but if you use software RAID you can't as it's only for that motherboard so to connect those devices to a new computer you would have to reformat your drives to make it visible but you would lose all your data.

I don't think what you're trying to achieve is possible, it would just be better to buy 2 big sized external HDD's and then copy the same information between each other so you have a backup without using RAID, but it would be a lot of work to always have the same files :p 

Hopefully that answers your question.
m
0
l
July 14, 2012 9:13:55 PM


antamo said:
It would need to be the same "hardware" raid card, which you could take out and place inside another computer and this will allow you to use your data, but if you use software RAID you can't as it's only for that motherboard so to connect those devices to a new computer you would have to reformat your drives to make it visible but you would lose all your data.

I figured that would be the case for raid using a card, but was hoping that the raid available with Windows OS might be an exception. I doubt it.
antamo said:
I don't think what you're trying to achieve is possible, it would just be better to buy 2 big sized external HDD's and then copy the same information between each other so you have a backup without using RAID, but it would be a lot of work to always have the same files :p 

Hopefully that answers your question.

thanks, that's pretty much the decision I reached: avoiding raid and looking into automated software backups between an external drive and one inside the pc. A new search is born :ouch: 
m
0
l
July 15, 2012 8:24:44 AM

That's what I have kinda decided to do but instead, I have same sized HDD and then by using acronis backup I will have a copy of it on the other HDD it's like RAID 1 but no RAID.
m
0
l
!