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Problem (I Dont know what it is) [Updated]

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May 22, 2010 10:25:51 PM

Ok so I built a computer about a year ago and my CPU died recently (AMD Athlon dual core AM2+ I forget the name) so I bought another one to replace it (AMD 1055t 6 core AM3) but when I installed it and no matter where i plugged in my monitor nothing showed up

CPU Specs

Nvidia nForce 750a SLI
AMD 1055t 6 core 2.80 GHz AM3
2 1TB Seagate HDDs (Raid 0)
4GB Corisair DDR2 RAM
Nvidia GeForce 9800 GT OC (BFG)
Nvidia GeForce 9600 GT (XFX)
PCIe x1 Firewire card
PCI USB 2.0 Card
Ultra 1000w Modular PSU
Generic brand DVD-RW drive
Gateway 19in 1440x900 monitor

I have plugged in the monitor in both video cards and in the on-board graphics and nothing shows up. I heard that I needed to update my BIOS to use the new CPU but I would think I would at least be able to see the BIOS to know what to update with. If someone would be kind enough to help me troubleshoot the problem I would be greatful.

Thank you for reading and please help!

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~[UPDATE]~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Ok so I got a processor that I know works on the mobo. I put it in and all went well. I updated the BIOS and it said "Process competed normally" or something similar. After this I reset my CMOS settings and restarted again. After this I turned off my computer, installed the new processor, and restarted. (Note: My keyboard normally flashes before the computer boots up) When I turned on the computer this time I heard everything. but my keyboard didn't flash and the monitor was still blank. So I put in the older processor again and this time the keyboard flashed (so I guess the CPU knows what plugged in) but the monitor stayed blank. So now I don't know if I did something wrong or if my new CPU is bad or if my mobo is bad.

Could someone please help again!! Thank you!

More about : problem dont updated

a b B Homebuilt system
May 22, 2010 10:38:00 PM

If you need a BIOS update to use a new CPU, you have to use an older CPU to update it. And you don't actually do it in the BIOS, you do it from either a DOS floppy or from withing windows.

Since your previous one was an AM2+ socket CPU, it should be within AMD's 3 year warranty. I'd suggest just RMAing that one and waiting to get it back.
May 22, 2010 11:18:29 PM

I probably will end up doing that but before I RMA it I want to solve this monitor problem. I don't think the CPU is the problem but I may be wrong.
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a b B Homebuilt system
May 22, 2010 11:31:27 PM

If the motherboard is really fine it simply doesn't know what you just plugged into it. It's nothing like any CPU it's had in it or put in for it. If you've never BIOS updated it probably doesn't even know what AM3 CPU's are.

Most likely there is no monitor issue. It's not like it would just magically run.
May 22, 2010 11:41:59 PM

False_Dmitry_II said:
If the motherboard is really fine it simply doesn't know what you just plugged into it. It's nothing like any CPU it's had in it or put in for it. If you've never BIOS updated it probably doesn't even know what AM3 CPU's are.

Most likely there is no monitor issue. It's not like it would just magically run.


Oh, I just noticed that my keyboard wasn't on either. So I guess it doesn't know anything is plugged in. So I'll have to update BIOS first.

And if you wouldn't mind me asking, how would I go about doing that?
a b B Homebuilt system
May 23, 2010 12:14:53 AM

My first question would be why do you think your CPU went bad? It is really, really, really, and I mean really rare for a CPU to have anything go wrong with it. Unless of course you were overclocking it like crazy, cranking up the voltage, etc.
Go to your motherboards website, see if there is a BIOS update available for your board that will support the CPU you want to install. You should have done this before you ran out and bought a CPU that may or may not work on your board. The directions to update the BIOS are in your manual. If you don't have it, you can download it from the motherboard web site. Better make sure you know what you are doing, and once again I wonder, why did your last CPU go bad? If you have done something that damaged the CPU, you likely damaged more than just the CPU because like I said, CPU's just don't go bad. It simply does not happen.
May 23, 2010 12:53:54 AM

jitpublisher said:
My first question would be why do you think your CPU went bad? It is really, really, really, and I mean really rare for a CPU to have anything go wrong with it. Unless of course you were overclocking it like crazy, cranking up the voltage, etc.
Go to your motherboards website, see if there is a BIOS update available for your board that will support the CPU you want to install. You should have done this before you ran out and bought a CPU that may or may not work on your board. The directions to update the BIOS are in your manual. If you don't have it, you can download it from the motherboard web site. Better make sure you know what you are doing, and once again I wonder, why did your last CPU go bad? If you have done something that damaged the CPU, you likely damaged more than just the CPU because like I said, CPU's just don't go bad. It simply does not happen.


Well what happened was, I tried to overclock and it went fine for a while but my CPU cooler stopped working (don't know how maybe plug got pulled out) and when I went in to check on it I pulled out the CPU and it was literally melted. I am never overclocking after this indecent.

Ok, so I got the BIOS update file and I read the manual and I couldn't find anything about installing the new bios. But it came in a ISO file and I don't think those work with floppys. I don't know if the BIOS has its own flashing software built in or if I need Windows but it does have an option to enable and disable flash protection.
a b B Homebuilt system
May 23, 2010 1:16:38 AM

Well you'd have to disable the protection while you're updating it. I'd leave it on normally though, there are some virus' that can actually attack that. It being an iso means they deigned to give you some way to actually run it outside of windows. I wish it happened more often. Just burn it to a CD and boot it once you can.

Oh, and since you melted it with overclocking don't bother trying to RMA it. Overclocking isn't covered.

What you'll have to do is go buy some random CPU that you know will work in it, update the BIOS, put then six core in. Once that's working you can sell the CPU you used to flash it. Sorry to say but nobody takes returns on CPU's.
May 23, 2010 1:22:25 AM

False_Dmitry_II said:
Well you'd have to disable the protection while you're updating it. I'd leave it on normally though, there are some virus' that can actually attack that. It being an iso means they deigned to give you some way to actually run it outside of windows. I wish it happened more often. Just burn it to a CD and boot it once you can.

Oh, and since you melted it with overclocking don't bother trying to RMA it. Overclocking isn't covered.

What you'll have to do is go buy some random CPU that you know will work in it, update the BIOS, put then six core in. Once that's working you can sell the CPU you used to flash it. Sorry to say but nobody takes returns on CPU's.


Aww... no RMA. Oh well, I think it was only like a $60 CPU anyway. So crap working CPU, flash, then sell. Got it. I'll probably get one tonight or tomorrow and update the thread with details on how it goes.

Thank you so much.
May 24, 2010 10:02:07 PM

I've updated my status with the computer. Please help!
a b B Homebuilt system
May 24, 2010 10:40:55 PM

You may need to manually set RAM information in the BIOS since you reset your CMOS settings. What exact RAM kit do you have? Have you tried booting with each stick of RAM installed by itself so you can get into the BIOS and change settings?
May 25, 2010 12:09:44 AM

shortstuff_mt said:
You may need to manually set RAM information in the BIOS since you reset your CMOS settings. What exact RAM kit do you have? Have you tried booting with each stick of RAM installed by itself so you can get into the BIOS and change settings?


I have 2 sticks of Corsair XMS2 2GB DDR2. So are you suggesting only using one stick of ram with my new processor or the one I know works? And what RAM settings are you speaking of? I have never seen any RAM settings in my BIOS unless I just missed them.
May 25, 2010 12:52:26 AM

shortstuff_mt said:
You may need to manually set RAM information in the BIOS since you reset your CMOS settings. What exact RAM kit do you have? Have you tried booting with each stick of RAM installed by itself so you can get into the BIOS and change settings?


OK, so with my new processor I tried all different RAM/Slot combination's possible and none of them booted up.
May 25, 2010 7:22:11 AM

No more suggestions? I really need this fixed please.
a b B Homebuilt system
May 25, 2010 2:49:44 PM

Like I said, if you actually were able to kill a processor, you likely did damage to your motherboard as well. Were you able to successfully flash a new BIOS to the board, or is the board still dead?
May 25, 2010 3:17:16 PM

jitpublisher said:
Like I said, if you actually were able to kill a processor, you likely did damage to your motherboard as well. Were you able to successfully flash a new BIOS to the board, or is the board still dead?


I was able to flash my BIOS so I don't think the board is dead. And as I said before everything worked with the older processor that I bought to flash it. I think the problem is something else.
a b B Homebuilt system
May 25, 2010 5:11:04 PM

Doing damage does not equal instant death. Maybe it just took that long for it to catch up with it. Maybe the new CPU actually has too high a TDP and that killed it. Maybe the flash didn't really go right.

My dad's mobo had an option within the BIOS to flash it. He used it. It then said successful. It then proceeded to never turn on again. He went to the support forums and as a sticky on the top of it the topic read more or less : "FOR THE LOVE OF GOD, DON'T use the BIOS flash within the BIOS, it WILL BRICK your board!"
It's an MSI and he literally had to RMA it because of that.

You did say that it no longer turns on with the one you used to flash in it.
May 25, 2010 6:41:31 PM

I don't think the TDP is too high, the board says its good up too 140W and the CPU is 125W. And I didn't use onboard BIOS flashing, I used a bootable CD to flash it (unless that is flashing within BIOS)

And how can I tell that my mobo is actually dead besides it not booting. Because there is this little LED number matrix display on my motherboard and It flashes numbers like temp and stuff and It has been running normally even though I cant boot, and the fans seem to fluctuate with temperature like they should normally. But I am far from an expert so I doubt these things mean anything.

But to the point, are there any ways to see if your mobo is truly damaged beyond repair besides it just not booting?
a b B Homebuilt system
May 25, 2010 8:02:12 PM

Well it sounds like it has a boot code on it then, try looking up what they mean and what it's stopping at.

Other than that I'm sure there is something to actually test a motherboard but hobbyists like us certainly don't have it.

You can try to RMA the mobo, and see what they say. Just tell them that you BIOS flashed it because you wanted to use the six core CPU. That it doesn't seem to work after that. They'll probably fix it or possibly even just flash it correctly (which was the point I was trying to make, a message saying successful doesn't necessarily mean that it didn't go horribly wrong.) and then send it back to you.

I had to send mine in once because it just sorta stopped working. They sent it back and were like "nothings wrong with it" and I was like wha? but it worked. Then I noticed that the BIOS was the newest version.
May 25, 2010 8:09:38 PM

False_Dmitry_II said:
Well it sounds like it has a boot code on it then, try looking up what they mean and what it's stopping at.

Other than that I'm sure there is something to actually test a motherboard but hobbyists like us certainly don't have it.

You can try to RMA the mobo, and see what they say. Just tell them that you BIOS flashed it because you wanted to use the six core CPU. That it doesn't seem to work after that. They'll probably fix it or possibly even just flash it correctly (which was the point I was trying to make, a message saying successful doesn't necessarily mean that it didn't go horribly wrong.) and then send it back to you.

I had to send mine in once because it just sorta stopped working. They sent it back and were like "nothings wrong with it" and I was like wha? but it worked. Then I noticed that the BIOS was the newest version.



Ok, I'll try RMAing it but who should I RMA it to? The manufacturer or from where I bought it because I bought it I think more than a year ago and I don't think the store will take it.
a b B Homebuilt system
May 25, 2010 10:51:50 PM

The manufacturer.
May 26, 2010 12:09:06 AM

False_Dmitry_II said:
The manufacturer.


Thank you, I'm contacting them now.
!