Do I need a HDD and an SSD in my desktop? (Gaming purposes)

Do I need to put an SSD drive in my P.C along with a HDD or can i choose one, and if so which will be better for gaming?
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More about desktop gaming purposes
  1. All a SSD really does for gaming is quicker load times. Usually you would get a SSD for the OS and a few games and then a HDD for storage space since its a lot cheaper.
    Reply to kurjack
  2. Right. It only helps level loads for gaming, but it helps them a lot. If you need to store images/music/movies I'd get one of each. Otherwise, just the biggest SSD you can afford (well, up to 256GB - after that, I'd say you may be clinging to too many old games).
    Reply to J_E_D_70
  3. Yes do want that for few reasons. But u can get away with that. If u have a fast HDD.

    This one deals with small files just fine and that's what u need.


    SAMSUNG 830 Series MZ-7PC128B/WW 2.5" 128GB SATA III MLC Internal Solid State Drive (SSD)

    was: $144.99 -> $129.99 ->$89.99 - use coupon code EMCYTZT1880

    FREE SHIPPING

    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820147163&nm_mc=AFC-C8Junction&cm_mmc=AFC-C8Junction-_-na-_-na-_-na&AID=10446076&PID=1727683&SID=170911
    Reply to nikorr
  4. Quote:
    Do I need to put an SSD drive in my P.C along with a HDD or can i choose one, and if so which will be better for gaming?


    NO. You do not need both drives, but many enjoy using both. An alternative for you if you have not already purchased is to buy a hybrid drive, and get the best of both worlds (to an extent) for much less money.

    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16822148837

    Edit...That Samsung above my post is a HELL of a good deal though.
    Reply to Cjsparky
  5. I have one of those Samsung 830s, a 256gb one, and it's great.
    Reply to Rericksen
  6. Game loading SSD vs HDD:
    The difference isn't as much as you might think. I've seen actual reviews and tried it myself.

    When a game first starts, there are sometimes cut scenes that can't be cancelled as well as the CPU and GPU sorting out the textures etc.

    The games I tested varied from about 5% to 25% faster loading and that's comparing a hard drive to a 3xRAID0 (max 700MBytes/second).

    It surprised me too.

    The Windows experience is a different story. I had a failed SSD and temporarily went back to a 300GB Velociraptor. Fast, right? My system felt sluggish booting and opening apps despite my 8GB of RAM.

    That Samsung 830 is a great SSD. It's not just about performance; many of the SSD's have short-term and long-term issues. I watched a blog with PC Perspective and they covered SSD's and the conclusion was: best is Intel/Samsung but Samsung 830 wins for price.
    Reply to photonboy
  7. Guess your mileage may vary. I had a velociraptor and didn't get into BF3 maps until everyone else was already taking flags. Now I'm waiting on them. In Skyrim, sometimes the loading text that's about a sentence long disappear before I can read the whole thing. And my SSD is "old."
    Reply to J_E_D_70
  8. SSD are great but if your on a budget its better with a normal hard DRive alone, just be sure that the drive has alot of cache, like 64mb cache so it runs smooth
    Reply to dosdecarnitas
  9. It's not worth paying the extra $90+ for 10 seconds.
    Reply to amuffin
  10. amuffin said:
    It's not worth paying the extra $90+ for 10 seconds.


    Depending on what you are doing, that 10 seconds adds up over the course of a day very quickly.
    Reply to Cjsparky
  11. Then people shouldn't be spending that time gaming :P
    Reply to amuffin
  12. amuffin said:
    Then people shouldn't be spending that time gaming :P


    Got it! Thanks! OK all, Wanting to sell my SSD Vertex 3. Looking for a sucker to double down on my obvious bad purchase decision!
    Reply to Cjsparky
  13. ^ LOL. I only use my PC for gaming and surfing and would not trade my "old" SSD for anything. Will never own another mechanical drive in my gaming rigs (other PC for media is a different story).
    Reply to J_E_D_70
  14. Limited writes ftw!
    Reply to amuffin
  15. Average user will never reach the end of limited writes. Even on old SSD.
    Reply to nikorr
  16. Windows writes a ton of files :P
    Reply to amuffin
  17. And that's good, amufffin, since that will eventually force me to buy a bigger, faster SSD. I love it! Great ploy by the SSD makers.
    Reply to J_E_D_70
  18. 8.13 TB=8325.12 of writes and still @ 100%

    Its only 50GB and its bit old today with SATA2 interface.

    Reply to nikorr
  19. 15044hrs = 626.83 days of run time.
    Reply to nikorr
  20. nikorr said:
    15044hrs = 626.83 days of run time.
    And the power on count is 729 so that fits rather well for a machine that is on for most of each day for approximately 2 years. One of my older machines has similar stats.

    The statistic of note is down the list - E7 SSD life left = 100%

    To answer the OP - yes, an SSD can make a game changing difference for some games. In EVE online entering space from a station leaves you vulnerable until your environment has loaded. That loading time is shorter from an SSD. Under certain game scenarios a 5 second difference can mean remaining intact or losing your ship and being in your pod.


    Q
    Reply to Flying-Q
  21. amuffin said:
    It's not worth paying the extra $90+ for 10 seconds.


    Holy Crap! This makes the most sense to me lol!
    Reply to ToastyDonuts
  22. ToastyDonuts said:
    amuffin said:
    It's not worth paying the extra $90+ for 10 seconds.


    Holy Crap! This makes the most sense to me lol!


    That comment was almost THREE YEARS ago. It's not very relevant now. You can buy a 250GB SSD for roughly $100 that not only helps for Windows but quite a few games as well. Many people would buy a 120GB SSD just for Windows (plus applications); the extra $40 or so for most or all of their games is rather a small price to pay.

    It's worth noting you can have a STEAM game folder on each drive thus choose to install (or move) only the games that benefit most to the SSD (such as Skryim due to the frequent loading of dungeons, map points etc).
    Reply to photonboy
  23. photonboy said:
    ToastyDonuts said:
    amuffin said:
    It's not worth paying the extra $90+ for 10 seconds.


    Holy Crap! This makes the most sense to me lol!


    That comment was almost THREE YEARS ago. It's not very relevant now. You can buy a 250GB SSD for roughly $100 that not only helps for Windows but quite a few games as well. Many people would buy a 120GB SSD just for Windows (plus applications); the extra $40 or so for most or all of their games is rather a small price to pay.

    It's worth noting you can have a STEAM game folder on each drive thus choose to install (or move) only the games that benefit most to the SSD (such as Skryim due to the frequent loading of dungeons, map points etc).


    Could you help me with a dilema regarding SSD/HDD's?

    i have a 2TB hdd that i have all my files on which i want to remove without copying any files from it. So i was going to just get another HDD to replace it but then I looked into SSD's.

    Would I be able to reinstall Windows (the OS) onto the SSD, but make it so that everything else goes to the HDD? How would i configure that?
    Reply to Rtoder209
  24. How's ur PC now
    Reply to JusticeF
  25. J_E_D_70 said:
    Right. It only helps level loads for gaming, but it helps them a lot. If you need to store images/music/movies I'd get one of each. Otherwise, just the biggest SSD you can afford (well, up to 256GB - after that, I'd say you may be clinging to too many old games).


    What about if I have a HYBRID SSD+HHD?
    Reply to Michael360Katrina
  26. Michael360Katrina said:
    J_E_D_70 said:
    Right. It only helps level loads for gaming, but it helps them a lot. If you need to store images/music/movies I'd get one of each. Otherwise, just the biggest SSD you can afford (well, up to 256GB - after that, I'd say you may be clinging to too many old games).


    What about if I have a HYBRID SSD+HHD?



    As a single unit it's called an SSHD, but most only have 8GB of flash memory. The firmware makes a decision on what files will give the best experience (such as boot files) but there's still only 8GB. Better than only an HDD but not as good as a full SSD.

    Another option was Intel's SRT (Smart Response Technology) which just added an SSD to use as a cache in the same manner as above but it's a separate unit. It was mainly used when SSD's cost a lot more so having 30GB SSD's as a cache was common.

    But, it's generally best to have a 120GB or higher capacity SSD for Windows/apps then use an HDD(s) for most everything else, including making a backup IMAGE of the Windows SSD in case something goes wrong (failure of SSD or corrupted data).
    Reply to photonboy
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