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Laptops with good display quality?

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Anonymous
a b D Laptop
October 8, 2004 5:36:53 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

Hi all,

Do you have any recommendations as to laptops with magnificent TFT displays?

My eyes tend to be a little "sensitive" to things I stare at for up to 8-12
hrs a day, so to me the quality of the display is *the* most important
feature of a laptop.

Currently I carry a chunky 5-yr old Inspiron 7500, but sadly it is overly
ripe for replacement...
So, which of todays laptops can measure up to this aged beauty in terms of
display contrast, brightness and clarity?
Optimally it should be in the range "carryable desktop-replacement slash
mobile workstation", with at least 15" display.

I have tried an Acer Travelmate 8005, but after a weekend of working
overtime it is giving me the headaches.

Anyone got first-hand experience with these for instance:
* Dell Precision M60
* IBM Thinkpad T42P
* Hewlett Packard NC8000
* Dell Inspiron 8600C

Regards,
Kristian
October 8, 2004 5:36:54 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

My mom has a nc8000, and I've used an 8600 before. The nc8000 display has
nothing special about it, just a regular lcd. The 8600 has a nice widescreen
ultrasharp screen, which has better response times and viewing angles. If
you want a really nice screen, i suggest you look into a notebook that has a
glassy coating, such as the sony x-brite screen. Every manufacturer offers a
notebook with this type of screen, but the names differ. I know that the
Toshiba M30 series offers so, so does the T42P from IBM.
"Kristian Berge Nessa" <kristian.nessa.zaphodbeeblebrox@hatteland.com> wrote
in message news:2sncemF1m1drsU1@uni-berlin.de...
> Hi all,
>
> Do you have any recommendations as to laptops with magnificent TFT
> displays?
>
> My eyes tend to be a little "sensitive" to things I stare at for up to
> 8-12
> hrs a day, so to me the quality of the display is *the* most important
> feature of a laptop.
>
> Currently I carry a chunky 5-yr old Inspiron 7500, but sadly it is overly
> ripe for replacement...
> So, which of todays laptops can measure up to this aged beauty in terms of
> display contrast, brightness and clarity?
> Optimally it should be in the range "carryable desktop-replacement slash
> mobile workstation", with at least 15" display.
>
> I have tried an Acer Travelmate 8005, but after a weekend of working
> overtime it is giving me the headaches.
>
> Anyone got first-hand experience with these for instance:
> * Dell Precision M60
> * IBM Thinkpad T42P
> * Hewlett Packard NC8000
> * Dell Inspiron 8600C
>
> Regards,
> Kristian
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
October 8, 2004 6:05:01 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

There are not the differences in display quality that there used to be.
They are all pretty good. There are some differences in brightness,
contrast ratio and response time, but for non-gaming and non-video
applications, even the worst are probably good enough to meet your
requirements. I can't imagine why any laptop would give you a headache,
unless you are watching movies or playing action games.


Kristian Berge Nessa wrote:

> Hi all,
>
> Do you have any recommendations as to laptops with magnificent TFT displays?
>
> My eyes tend to be a little "sensitive" to things I stare at for up to 8-12
> hrs a day, so to me the quality of the display is *the* most important
> feature of a laptop.
>
> Currently I carry a chunky 5-yr old Inspiron 7500, but sadly it is overly
> ripe for replacement...
> So, which of todays laptops can measure up to this aged beauty in terms of
> display contrast, brightness and clarity?
> Optimally it should be in the range "carryable desktop-replacement slash
> mobile workstation", with at least 15" display.
>
> I have tried an Acer Travelmate 8005, but after a weekend of working
> overtime it is giving me the headaches.
>
> Anyone got first-hand experience with these for instance:
> * Dell Precision M60
> * IBM Thinkpad T42P
> * Hewlett Packard NC8000
> * Dell Inspiron 8600C
>
> Regards,
> Kristian
Related resources
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
October 8, 2004 6:33:26 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

Dan wrote:

> My mom has a nc8000, and I've used an 8600 before. The nc8000 display has
> nothing special about it, just a regular lcd. The 8600 has a nice
> widescreen ultrasharp screen, which has better response times and viewing
> If you want a really nice screen, i suggest you look into a
> notebook that has a glassy coating, such as the sony x-brite screen. Every
> manufacturer offers a notebook with this type of screen, but the names
> differ. I know that the Toshiba M30 series offers so, so does the T42P
> from IBM.

This is very interesting. I've seen the XBrite tag while looking on some
sony laptops, but since I was at the time unable to find any conclusive
information as to what it really *was*, I just assumed it was marketing
mumbo-jumbo...

Might this also be what the mysterious Dell tag "Ultrasharp (tm)" means?

Kristian
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
October 8, 2004 6:33:27 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

All laptop displays are digitally interfaced, and thus all of them are
"perfectly" sharp. The only differences in digitally interfaced
displays are:

-brightness
-contrast ratio
-response time
-viewing angle

In fact, contrast ratio is over-rated, once you are at about 450:1 (or
maybe even down to 250:1), further improvements don't matter much.

And response time only matters for viewing motion images (movies or
games), but not for word processing, spreadsheets, most web browsing.

Wide viewing angle can actually be a drawback in some applications where
you want privacy.

And even high brightness can work against you if you can't dim it.


Kristian Berge Nessa wrote:

> Dan wrote:
>
>
>>My mom has a nc8000, and I've used an 8600 before. The nc8000 display has
>>nothing special about it, just a regular lcd. The 8600 has a nice
>>widescreen ultrasharp screen, which has better response times and viewing
>>If you want a really nice screen, i suggest you look into a
>>notebook that has a glassy coating, such as the sony x-brite screen. Every
>>manufacturer offers a notebook with this type of screen, but the names
>>differ. I know that the Toshiba M30 series offers so, so does the T42P
>>from IBM.
>
>
> This is very interesting. I've seen the XBrite tag while looking on some
> sony laptops, but since I was at the time unable to find any conclusive
> information as to what it really *was*, I just assumed it was marketing
> mumbo-jumbo...
>
> Might this also be what the mysterious Dell tag "Ultrasharp (tm)" means?
>
> Kristian
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
October 8, 2004 6:42:22 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

Sorry, I see now that you were in fact referring to the *Dell* 8600 i
mentioned, with a "ultrasharp" display.... That kind of answers my
question, yea. ;D

But thanks again!

Kristian
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
October 8, 2004 8:36:27 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

Barry Watzman wrote:

> There are not the differences in display quality that there used to be.

Well, that's what I thought too.
Which was why my employer was able to "trick" me into trying the Travelmate
in the first place...

But when I put my 5+ year old laptop side-by-side with the brand new
replacement, there can't be any doubts. They are like night & day, the OLD
one being "day".

And upon reading Matthew Barnard's thread on his "Returned Acer 8006LMi" I
was happy to discover that I was not the only one with such experiences.

> They are all pretty good. There are some differences in brightness,
> contrast ratio and response time, but for non-gaming and non-video
> applications, even the worst are probably good enough to meet your
> requirements. I can't imagine why any laptop would give you a headache,
> unless you are watching movies or playing action games.

Well, I for one believe working full days staring at a screen is actually
pushing the limits harder than occasionally watching movies or playing
games...

Regards,
Kristian
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
October 9, 2004 1:48:41 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

You will find the best displays on
Panasonic, Sharp and Fujitsu units.

Everything else is downhill from there.



dk


"Kristian Berge Nessa" <kristian.nessa.zaphodbeeblebrox@hatteland.com> wrote
in message news:2sncemF1m1drsU1@uni-berlin.de...
> Hi all,
>
> Do you have any recommendations as to laptops with magnificent TFT
displays?
>
> My eyes tend to be a little "sensitive" to things I stare at for up to
8-12
> hrs a day, so to me the quality of the display is *the* most important
> feature of a laptop.
>
> Currently I carry a chunky 5-yr old Inspiron 7500, but sadly it is overly
> ripe for replacement...
> So, which of todays laptops can measure up to this aged beauty in terms of
> display contrast, brightness and clarity?
> Optimally it should be in the range "carryable desktop-replacement slash
> mobile workstation", with at least 15" display.
>
> I have tried an Acer Travelmate 8005, but after a weekend of working
> overtime it is giving me the headaches.
>
> Anyone got first-hand experience with these for instance:
> * Dell Precision M60
> * IBM Thinkpad T42P
> * Hewlett Packard NC8000
> * Dell Inspiron 8600C
>
> Regards,
> Kristian
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
October 9, 2004 1:49:53 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

In article <41674379$1@news.meer.net>, Dan Koren <dankoren@yahoo.com> wrote:
>
>You will find the best displays on
>Panasonic, Sharp and Fujitsu units.
>
>Everything else is downhill from there.


The apple laptops screens are great.


>
>
>
>dk
>
>
>"Kristian Berge Nessa" <kristian.nessa.zaphodbeeblebrox@hatteland.com> wrote
>in message news:2sncemF1m1drsU1@uni-berlin.de...
>> Hi all,
>>
>> Do you have any recommendations as to laptops with magnificent TFT
>displays?
>>
>> My eyes tend to be a little "sensitive" to things I stare at for up to
>8-12
>> hrs a day, so to me the quality of the display is *the* most important
>> feature of a laptop.
>>
>> Currently I carry a chunky 5-yr old Inspiron 7500, but sadly it is overly
>> ripe for replacement...
>> So, which of todays laptops can measure up to this aged beauty in terms of
>> display contrast, brightness and clarity?
>> Optimally it should be in the range "carryable desktop-replacement slash
>> mobile workstation", with at least 15" display.
>>
>> I have tried an Acer Travelmate 8005, but after a weekend of working
>> overtime it is giving me the headaches.
>>
>> Anyone got first-hand experience with these for instance:
>> * Dell Precision M60
>> * IBM Thinkpad T42P
>> * Hewlett Packard NC8000
>> * Dell Inspiron 8600C
>>
>> Regards,
>> Kristian
>
>


--
Al Dykes
-----------
adykes at p a n i x . c o m
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
October 9, 2004 1:53:03 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

I would bet the Acer she looked at was either
1) set to display at a non-native resolution or
2) does not have an updated driver

"Barry Watzman" <WatzmanNOSPAM@neo.rr.com> wrote in message
news:4166A2EC.4090407@neo.rr.com...
> All laptop displays are digitally interfaced, and thus all of them are
> "perfectly" sharp. The only differences in digitally interfaced
> displays are:
>
> -brightness
> -contrast ratio
> -response time
> -viewing angle
>
> In fact, contrast ratio is over-rated, once you are at about 450:1 (or
> maybe even down to 250:1), further improvements don't matter much.
>
> And response time only matters for viewing motion images (movies or
> games), but not for word processing, spreadsheets, most web browsing.
>
> Wide viewing angle can actually be a drawback in some applications where
> you want privacy.
>
> And even high brightness can work against you if you can't dim it.
>
>
> Kristian Berge Nessa wrote:
>
> > Dan wrote:
> >
> >
> >>My mom has a nc8000, and I've used an 8600 before. The nc8000 display
has
> >>nothing special about it, just a regular lcd. The 8600 has a nice
> >>widescreen ultrasharp screen, which has better response times and
viewing
> >>If you want a really nice screen, i suggest you look into a
> >>notebook that has a glassy coating, such as the sony x-brite screen.
Every
> >>manufacturer offers a notebook with this type of screen, but the names
> >>differ. I know that the Toshiba M30 series offers so, so does the T42P
> >>from IBM.
> >
> >
> > This is very interesting. I've seen the XBrite tag while looking on some
> > sony laptops, but since I was at the time unable to find any conclusive
> > information as to what it really *was*, I just assumed it was marketing
> > mumbo-jumbo...
> >
> > Might this also be what the mysterious Dell tag "Ultrasharp (tm)" means?
> >
> > Kristian
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
October 9, 2004 4:03:35 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

On or about 10/8/2004 7:36 AM, it came to pass that Kristian Berge Nessa wrote:
> Hi all,
>
> Do you have any recommendations as to laptops with magnificent TFT displays?
>
> My eyes tend to be a little "sensitive" to things I stare at for up to 8-12
> hrs a day, so to me the quality of the display is *the* most important
> feature of a laptop.
>
> Currently I carry a chunky 5-yr old Inspiron 7500, but sadly it is overly
> ripe for replacement...
> So, which of todays laptops can measure up to this aged beauty in terms of
> display contrast, brightness and clarity?
> Optimally it should be in the range "carryable desktop-replacement slash
> mobile workstation", with at least 15" display.
>
> I have tried an Acer Travelmate 8005, but after a weekend of working
> overtime it is giving me the headaches.
>
> Anyone got first-hand experience with these for instance:
> * Dell Precision M60
> * IBM Thinkpad T42P
> * Hewlett Packard NC8000
> * Dell Inspiron 8600C
>
> Regards,
> Kristian
As the still happy owner of a Dell Inspiron 7000 with the 15 inch screen I fully
understand your satisfaction with the display. If machine weight or the need to
play games is your primary issue for an upgrade, then yes I agree replace your
system. However if you simply need a bit more performance then I suggest the
following: max out the memory; install a faster and larger hard drive such as a
5400 or 7200rpm with 8 or 16 meg buffer, this will provide the biggest
performance gain on this machine; if you are adventurous install a faster CPU.
You can also easily upgrade the CD with a CD/RW DVD combo or DVD writer.
Combined with an OS update you won't believe it's the same machine and the cost
will be far less than purchasing a new replacement.

Arn
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
October 9, 2004 2:56:32 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

arnb wrote:

> As the still happy owner of a Dell Inspiron 7000 with the 15 inch screen I
> fully understand your satisfaction with the display. If machine weight or
> the need to
> play games is your primary issue for an upgrade, then yes I agree
> replace your
> system. However if you simply need a bit more performance then I suggest
> the following: max out the memory; install a faster and larger hard drive
> such as a 5400 or 7200rpm with 8 or 16 meg buffer, this will provide the
> biggest performance gain on this machine; if you are adventurous install a
> faster CPU. You can also easily upgrade the CD with a CD/RW DVD combo or
> DVD writer. Combined with an OS update you won't believe it's the same
> machine and the cost will be far less than purchasing a new replacement.
>
> Arn

Thanks for the tips, I truly wish it were that simple. :) 
I keep getting all sorts of weird errors, suddenly the keyboard stops
working, the entire machine just locks up, the HDD is ridden with bad
sectors, APM is broken and ACPI is barely working (since I updated the
BIOS), and so forth.

Signs that, when added together, led me to the conclusion that it was time
for a change...

And no, it's no gaming machine, it's my work laptop, but my latest
adventures in C++ do take an average 2 minutes to compile, so a bit more
oomph is certainly be welcome.

Regards,
Kristian
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
October 9, 2004 3:04:31 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

Joe Davis wrote:

> I would bet the Acer she looked at was either
> 1) set to display at a non-native resolution or
> 2) does not have an updated driver

Uhm... It's a *he*... :D 
....And *he* wonders how someone that hasn't even figured out how not to top
post has been able to so accurately deduce my lack of intelligence that
this someone is willing to place a bet on it... :p 
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
October 9, 2004 4:07:08 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

"Kristian Berge Nessa" <kristian.nessa.zaphodbeeblebrox@hatteland.com> wrote
in message news:2spnsvF1olj4oU1@uni-berlin.de...
> Joe Davis wrote:
>
> > I would bet the Acer she looked at was either
> > 1) set to display at a non-native resolution or
> > 2) does not have an updated driver
>
> Uhm... It's a *he*... :D 
> ...And *he* wonders how someone that hasn't even figured out how not to
top
> post has been able to so accurately deduce my lack of intelligence that
> this someone is willing to place a bet on it... :p 

Sorry about the pronoun, but I had investigated that model when it came out
(did not buy it). That Acer gets generally good reviews for screen
resolution (it has a 128 MB graphics card, and the screen is usually
described as "sharp"; a lot of gamers like it for its graphics/video
capability). However, native resolution is 1400 x 1050, which a lot of
folks don't like and reset to smaller (and blurier) values.

That model also had know issues with the display driver when it first came
out. I was really responding to Barry's comment about the similarity among
screens.
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
October 10, 2004 8:50:18 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

My wife is the same way. After much research, we settled on a thinkpad with
IBM FlexView screen technology (only available on a few models with their
largest screens). It's brighter, clearer, and allows a clear viewing range
from side to side of almost 170 degrees.

If this isn't enough (that is, if no screen technology is enough to
compensate for your visual problem), try ZoomText from AI Squared (software
add-on for enlarging and/or improving the contrast of a screen display
beyond the capabilities built-in to Windows).

hth,

Chip


"Kristian Berge Nessa" <kristian.nessa.zaphodbeeblebrox@hatteland.com> wrote
in message news:2sncemF1m1drsU1@uni-berlin.de...
> Hi all,
>
> Do you have any recommendations as to laptops with magnificent TFT
> displays?
>
> My eyes tend to be a little "sensitive" to things I stare at for up to
> 8-12
> hrs a day, so to me the quality of the display is *the* most important
> feature of a laptop.
>
> Currently I carry a chunky 5-yr old Inspiron 7500, but sadly it is overly
> ripe for replacement...
> So, which of todays laptops can measure up to this aged beauty in terms of
> display contrast, brightness and clarity?
> Optimally it should be in the range "carryable desktop-replacement slash
> mobile workstation", with at least 15" display.
>
> I have tried an Acer Travelmate 8005, but after a weekend of working
> overtime it is giving me the headaches.
>
> Anyone got first-hand experience with these for instance:
> * Dell Precision M60
> * IBM Thinkpad T42P
> * Hewlett Packard NC8000
> * Dell Inspiron 8600C
>
> Regards,
> Kristian
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
October 10, 2004 11:09:12 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

"Al Dykes" <adykes@panix.com> wrote in message
news:ck7g41$9r9$1@panix5.panix.com...
> In article <41674379$1@news.meer.net>, Dan Koren <dankoren@yahoo.com>
wrote:
> >
> > You will find the best displays on
> > Panasonic, Sharp and Fujitsu units.
> >
> > Everything else is downhill from there.
>
> The apple laptops screens are great.
>


Did you notice how many recalls Apple
had lately for their screens? Not to
mention that the people who ask about
notebooks in general usually mean PC,
not Apple.



dk
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
October 11, 2004 7:01:59 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

My Suggestion is one of the VGN A-Series from SONY.

My Girlfriend had an new ACER with great Technical Features, but
after
watching me work with my SONY TR1 for a few months she gave her ACER
up for a Sony Vaio VGN-A115M
(the 15" one with 1280X800 resolution).

The main reason was the bright and sharp X-Black Screen of the SONY.
The VGN A Series Laptops even have an ambient light sensor which dims
the screen automatically.
My girlfriend loves that Function and the great screen. (She has to
work for several hours every day)


look here for the Various SONY Laptops available :
http://www.pcnolle.de/sony.htm

I think you should have a closer look at the Sony Vaio VGN-A115S with
XGA.
It has the traditional screen ratio (1024x768) and a 15" Display. The
Centrino Prozessor
has more than enough Power and the advantage is that it hardly ever
needs the cooling fan.

The outstanding Feature of the X-Black screen is the brighness
and the polarized glossy coating which reduces glare, but doesn't
show the grey shade of the classic anti glare coatings. The only time

the screen has to capitulate is a great amount of undirected light
(bright light through clouds). Normal sunlight is no problem.

WARNING: ADDICTIVE! :D 
February 14, 2007 3:24:37 PM

I just got my new dell 9400 with 17" wxga+ display and it is terrible. The brightness/contrast sucks, the color looks washed out, there appears to be grain or artifacts even though the resolution is pretty high compared to what im used to; the screen is 1400x900. Looking at the screen straight on and the display gets progressivly darker towards the bottom,,, im getting headaches after only a few hours. I coudl go on and on about how upset i am with this display; forget about trying to edit photos i cannot tell the screen artifacts from those in the actual photo. THIS is not the TrueLife display, however, and im curious as to how this model compares?
February 23, 2007 4:13:37 PM

if you dont care about what os you want to use... get a macbook core 2 duo. the screen is superb for the same price of a window laptop... besides... if you run bootcamp... you can also run window on it
!