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SSD vs HDD for recording high quality video?

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Anonymous
July 10, 2012 5:39:25 PM

Hi, I'm looking to buy a separate drive only to record 1080p video with. I was searching around google and see a few posts about HDDs being better than SSDs for recording due to the idea that SSDs don't have good/much better sequential write speeds. That does not make sense to me as they are advertised and benched much higher. Is this a concept with some of the first few generations of SSDs that had much lower speeds or is this a true fact still? What about 10k RPM drives vs SSDs?
July 10, 2012 5:44:05 PM

Well i would go for an HDD for recording 1080p video because of the amount of space for the price. You can get 2TB on an HDD for less the price of a 256GB SSD.
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a b G Storage
July 10, 2012 5:49:42 PM

Also SSD not that awasome in writing, it had great response in reading data but not at writing it... (at least if u compare it with the $/Gb from normal HDD)

For videos size is the matter even simple 3 min video could sized up to 500mb it will eat up the SSD space very quickly (depend the sound channel, color deph, etc)

edit:
If the use of SSD just for the sake of recording but not store it, it can be justify...

I never tried before but, if we increase the size of Memory (ram) as temporary buffer before writing it to disk, aren't those serve the same idea but cheaper to implement..?
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Anonymous
July 10, 2012 6:08:42 PM

That would be the point of the second drive. Only recording.
Price is not really a concern up to within reason, I know the argument on $ is made obviously to go for the HDDs but in terms of performance is it true that HDDs perform the same/better for writing compared to new gen SSDs?
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a b G Storage
July 10, 2012 6:17:21 PM

In that case SSD will win if the price is not concerned.... (no doubt about that)
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a b G Storage
July 10, 2012 6:17:36 PM

-double post- deleted
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Anonymous
July 10, 2012 6:20:08 PM

What's with all the random forum posts i see around google stating the SDDs fail for recording then? False information or just older generation issues?
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a b G Storage
July 10, 2012 6:54:57 PM

First gen SSD had many firmware issue, (right now it much better)

SSD performance will drop in line with free space it had, usually by clearing the space will return the performance but TRIM need time to work...
(U need to keep the size of the data in check, it kindda hard when u recording and U still need adequeted sized SSD)

by recording it means it will eat up the lifetime of ssd (since ssd depends on how much data writen to it, constan writing huge recorded data is stressing the ssd)

That the general idea, I think u already knew that. but I'll try look up with the post u mentioned.... (Other than not big enough, I can't think of why it will fails)

As my question about using memory as buffer before writing it to disk, is anyone can confirm if it could increase the performance since memory is fast?

edit:
I'll let the other verify this problems. since as much i work with ssd and videos only just editing and converting but not directly recoding it..

(the recording i ever do just recording for CCTV security system where size will gone very fast SSD is not an option)
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a c 812 G Storage
July 10, 2012 10:39:54 PM

Writting to an SSD is now much faster than an HDD but you will not see any difference in speed because you can only write as fast as you can send the HD stream. Since both HDD & SSD are fast enough to hangle this stream neither one will have an advantage.

SSD will have a huge advantage in system responsiveness and playback esp when you jump around in the video
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a c 353 G Storage
July 10, 2012 11:27:38 PM

^ Valid point. Recording or playback of 1080P does not exceed HDD throughput, So in this caser the SSD would ofter no advantage even thoug it is considerably faster. The SSD would run circles around the the HDD when "working" with the video files once it has been recorded.
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Anonymous
July 11, 2012 3:30:45 AM

In terms of noticing lag while recording, an SSD would be the above all HDDs though, correct? Or are you basically saying no difference at all between a HD and SSD? I understand that the output quality will not change. But i'm talking about performance while recording
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Anonymous
a b G Storage
July 11, 2012 3:37:13 AM

Anonymous said:
In terms of noticing lag while recording, an SSD would be the above all HDDs though, correct? Or are you basically saying no difference at all between a HD and SSD? I understand that the output quality will not change. But i'm talking about performance while recording

Quote:
Writting to an SSD is now much faster than an HDD but you will not see any difference in speed because you can only write as fast as you can send the HD stream. Since both HDD & SSD are fast enough to hangle this stream neither one will have an advantage.


the HD will keep up. if you are having lag while recording, is the same disk being shared with the OS or software?
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a b G Storage
July 11, 2012 3:48:38 AM

RetiredChief said:
^ Valid point. Recording or playback of 1080P does not exceed HDD throughput, So in this caser the SSD would ofter no advantage even thoug it is considerably faster. The SSD would run circles around the the HDD when "working" with the video files once it has been recorded.


well, if you're working with it, then RAMdisk, gigs are cheap, amirite?
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a c 353 G Storage
July 11, 2012 3:09:43 PM

s looniam stated, use a dedicated HDD, NOT the same HDD that OS, and Programs and games are on.

As to Ramdisk, yes they are about 10 times faster than an SSD it is also about 6 to 7 Xs more expensive as an SSD (Gigs/$$$ ie around 50 Bucks for 8 gigs vs $100 for 128 gigs). Then there is size, He did not mention typical size of a recording, but 1080P blue ray file can be anywheres from about 13 gigs -> 40 gigs per Hr and a half. Posibliy would need to disable autosave as that would inturn write to disk (at HDD speed).
Have Played around with Ramdisk (upto 8 gig size).
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a c 353 G Storage
July 12, 2012 1:52:18 PM

That sould work.
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Anonymous
July 12, 2012 7:43:15 PM

I don't think you can return HDs once you open them, can you? I need to know if it would work for sure :S
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a b G Storage
July 12, 2012 7:57:46 PM

Depends where you bought it, read the fine print or ask customer service where you are buying it from. if you can't be bothered to read.

Typically yes minus a fee such as 15% for working but didn't fit your needs. Exchanges for not-working usually are free.

Usually it's Software that can't be returned (but you may work with the software vendor for potential refund)
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Anonymous
July 12, 2012 8:28:55 PM

I always thought that you couldn't return hard drives because you're in a way physically changing the product. Was looking under the warranty information and couldn't find it anywhere, but yes there is a return policy for it (was somewhat separate information). I'll purchase it and give it a go.
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Anonymous
July 28, 2012 5:20:11 AM

So I ended up getting a WD black 1TB. It just doesn't work. Not a chance. 1080p will screw me pretty badly in-game. The recording turns out great, but it bogs me down incredibly much. What the heck does it take?
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Anonymous
a b G Storage
July 28, 2012 7:06:36 AM

ah, what do you mean "in game"?
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Anonymous
July 28, 2012 8:28:09 AM

As in, it chops up badly. The recording is flawless, but in-game is not very enjoyable. I'm settling for 720p, but I was expecting 1080p with all the information being put out on the net like "Hard drive will be fine". It's clearly not. I've tried afterburner, fraps, dxtory. None work with 1080p unless you make the quality way too horrible. Unless I'm doing something extremely wrong, I wouldn't know what though.
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Anonymous
a b G Storage
July 28, 2012 8:34:02 AM

Anonymous said:
As in, it chops up badly. The recording is flawless, but in-game is not very enjoyable. I'm settling for 720p, but I was expecting 1080p with all the information being put out on the net like "Hard drive will be fine". It's clearly not. I've tried afterburner, fraps, dxtory. None work with 1080p unless you make the quality way too horrible. Unless I'm doing something extremely wrong, I wouldn't know what though.

i'll put it another way, what are you doing while recording? why would you think afterburner, fraps, or dxtory would help?
if you are running a buttload of programs while recording, it not a hard drive issue you have but a RAM/cpu problem.
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Anonymous
July 28, 2012 8:37:52 AM

I'm recording in-game footage. That is it. When recording, it chops up badly, because the hard drive can NOT keep up with 1080p at good quality. It just can't. It's not a CPU/RAM problem and has nothing to do with my rig unless I'm doing something extremely wrong when recording or people actually record to drives like this and are able to stand playing games like that. It's miserable. I've tried different games, different recording software, it makes no difference. 720p works across the board. 1080p is not bearable for any decent gamer unless you're watching replays to record. At least not in my situation.
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Anonymous
a b G Storage
July 28, 2012 8:49:22 AM

Anonymous said:
I'm recording in-game footage. That is it. When recording, it chops up badly, because the hard drive can NOT keep up with 1080p at good quality. It just can't. It's not a CPU/RAM problem and has nothing to do with my rig unless I'm doing something extremely wrong when recording or people actually record to drives like this and are able to stand playing games like that. It's miserable. I've tried different games, different recording software, it makes no difference. 720p works across the board. 1080p is not bearable for any decent gamer unless you're watching replays to record. At least not in my situation.

ah, if your game play is being laggy or choppy, that has nothing to do with the hard drive. you can see for yourself by looking at the load on your cpu; if it is hitting 100% the whole time, there is the problem. also check the ram usage.
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Anonymous
July 28, 2012 9:19:23 AM

The gameplay while recording is choppy because the hard drive can't keep up. It has nothing to do with the system otherwise. Its not like I'm using old hardware here. Get an external or slower drive and see for yourself. Gameplay will immediately become unbearable unless you decrease the resolution or quality unless you're already recording on low settings.

And no my resources are not even close to being used up.
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Anonymous
a b G Storage
July 29, 2012 3:59:53 PM

the thing is gaming does not use the HD unless you are loading a level and since you are using a separate drive also it isn't a involved. there is little difference in the data being written to the disk 1080p vs 720p
Uncompressed video
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Anonymous
July 30, 2012 3:48:19 AM

I understand that. But right there it even points out.

8 bit @ 1920 x 1080 @ 29.97fps = 119 MB per/sec, or 417 GB per/hr.
10 bit @ 1920 x 1080 @ 29.97fps = 158 MB per/sec, or 556 GB per/hr.

My drive goes to 120 MB/sec, I doubt that's a 100% stable write speed. So that's pushing it way too close, which is probably why 1080 is laggy to me. Or if not. I don't understand how people are getting playable framerates and recording at 1080p. Both my card and CPU are overclocked as high as I can get them on a very efficient air setup. The only thing I could change would be to make my 1090t into a 3750k. But I don't see how that would make my frames go from really choppy to crystal clear, even though it is somewhat of a decent step up in hardware.
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a b G Storage
July 30, 2012 3:05:06 PM

OOT:
As i know 10 bit decoding could save lots of space if u compare with 8 bit one, so i'm confused with wiki term about 8 bit - 10 bit...

back to topic... The only fastest storage i can think of is RAM....,

I would try couple of idea, like

- schedule core 1-4 for the games and core 5-6 for the recording soft.
- change the sata port of ssd and hdd so they don't use shared connection (one conected to SB, other one to Jmicron) or the other way around (keep them conected in SB).

see if anything changes/helps?


As i know recording game is much harder than recording tv show (that maybe people who said hdd will fine assume it was for recording tv show). Most of tv show is recorded by intercept the data between the source and the tv/monitor, recording games means the source and the recorder is the same machine.



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November 27, 2012 9:25:12 PM

Hi ,
Ive been trying to look for a good setup myself and I was just wondering if, in your case ,is it the recorded footage that is laggy /choppy or the gameplay itself ?

Are you trying to play the game on the display/monitor of the computer that is recording? or a direct tv connection to your console?

As I would suppose there would be some kind of a display lag on the monitor(which is attached to the cpu that is recording).

So to fix this you would need some kind of a signal splitter so that you have a direct connection from the console to the tv/display you intend to play on and the recording equipment(ie is your computer)
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