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New CPU, mobo and power supply, now not booting

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  • Power Supplies
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July 29, 2010 6:34:21 AM

I just recently (today) installed a new mobo:

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

A new CPU:

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

and a new power supply:

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

I also have an nVidia 9400 GT video card (PCI).

These parts are running off of an HP Pavillion a1020n.

So, I installed these parts today and plugged everything in. When I powered on my computer the blue light (power button) comes on, the fans begin spinning, the hard drive sounds okay, but there is no video signal (it is not the monitor, I checked that already). Could it be that I received a DOA CPU? I'm at a loss here and am hoping that someone has some semblance of an idea. Thanks for any help you can give me.

More about : cpu mobo power supply booting

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July 29, 2010 7:03:12 AM

It just doesn't boot ? Do you hear any beeps or not ?
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July 29, 2010 7:07:15 AM

I think I can hear a beep, but with the fans running it's kind of hard to tell. I noticed that apparently my CPU can only run with the most recent BIOS settings... if, God forbid, this board doesn't have the latest settings, is there any hope?
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a c 172 à CPUs
a c 144 ) Power supply
July 29, 2010 7:09:46 AM

We need a :sigh: smiley.

OK. you had a working computer and you upgraded a bunch of parts at once and now it doesn't work. Yes?

First rule of upgrades: As much as possible, upgrade one component at a time. That way, if something goes wrong, you have a starting point.

Hindsight, yes? :)  The first thing you should have done was to change the PSU. Then if your formerly working system doesn't, you know what's wrong.

Motherboard and CPU pretty much need to be changed as a single unit. But CPU's are rarely bad.

Work through our standard checklist and troubleshooting thread:
http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/261145-31-read-postin...
yes? I mean work through, not just read over it.

Step 2. is a very common mistake.

Breadboard - that will isolate any kind of case problem.
http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/262730-31-breadboardi...

The breadboarding thread has a paragraph about how to build and test a PC in stages.

Breadboard with just motherboard, CPU & HSF, case speaker, and PSU. You do have a case speaker installed, right? If not, you really, really need one. If your case or motherboard didn't come with a system speaker, you can buy one here:
http://www.cwc-group.com/casp.html

You can turn on the PC by momentarily shorting the two pins that the case power switch goes to.

You should hear a series of long, single beeps indicating memory problems.
Silence indicates a problem with (in most likely order) the PSU, motherboard, or CPU.

At this point, you can sort of check the PSU. Try to borrow a known good PSU. If you cannot do that, use a DMM to measure the voltages. Measure between the colored wires and either chassis ground or the black wires. Yellow wires should be 12 volts. Red wires: +5 volts, orange wires: +3.3 volts, blue wire : -12 volts, violet wire: 5 volts always on. Tolerances are +/- 5% except for the -12 volts which is +/- 10%.

The gray wire is really important. It should go from 0 to +5 volts when you turn the PSU on with the case switch. CPU needs this signal to boot.

You can turn on the PSU by completely disconnecting the PSU and using a paperclip or jumper wire to short the green wire to one of the neighboring black wires.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5FWXgQSokF4&feature=yout...

This checks the PSU under no load conditions, so it is not completely reliable. But if
it can not pass this, it is dead. Then repeat the checks with the PSU plugged into the computer to put a load on the PSU.

If it looks like the PSU is good, install a memory stick. Boot. Beep pattern should change to one long and several short beeps indicating a missing graphics card. Silence or long single beeps indicate a problem with the memory.

Insert the video card and connect any necessary PCIe power connectors. Boot. At this point, the system should POST successfully (a single short beep). Notice that you do not need keyboard, mouse, monitor, or drives to successfully POST.

Now start connecting the rest of the devices starting with the monitor, then keyboard and mouse, then the rest of the devices, testing after each step.
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a b à CPUs
a b ) Power supply
July 29, 2010 7:11:43 AM

EDIT: NVM.
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July 29, 2010 7:15:05 AM

Lmeow said:
I checked MSI's website and the MSI G31TM-P21 does not support the Pentium Dual Core E6700 unfortunately - only the E6300 in the Pentium Dual Core E6000 series.


The funny thing is that in the book provided in the box the motherboard came in, it says it is supported...
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a b à CPUs
a b ) Power supply
July 29, 2010 7:17:28 AM

Sorry, didn't see it actually was supported on the site, temporary lapse of thinking sorry - happens pretty often these days? :( 

What BIOS version do you have? It requires v46 - your board may only have been shipped with BIOS v40, v41 or v45.

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July 29, 2010 7:20:46 AM

Lmeow said:
Sorry, didn't see it actually was supported on the site, temporary lapse of thinking sorry - happens pretty often these days? :( 

What BIOS version do you have? It requires v46 - your board may only have been shipped with BIOS v40, v41 or v45.


No worries :D  I'm thinking this might be the problem. How can I check?
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a c 172 à CPUs
a c 144 ) Power supply
July 29, 2010 7:26:35 AM

GAAAH! And I looked at the G31 board. :( 

Try to RMA the motherboard and get a Gigabyte GA-G41M-ES2L motherboard.
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

It's about the same price and does support all the latest LGA775 CPU's. And you will be able to do a fair amount of overclocking. :) 

Unfortunately, we are seeing the same problem with Intel boards that we have been seeing with AMD boards - compatibility problems. An older board may support a newer CPU with a BIOS upgrade, or not at all.
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a c 172 à CPUs
a c 144 ) Power supply
July 29, 2010 7:29:34 AM

shloopo said:
No worries :D  I'm thinking this might be the problem. How can I check?

Your old CPU chip should work to both check and download and upgrade to the newer BIOS.
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July 29, 2010 7:29:57 AM

jsc said:
GAAAH! And I looked at the G31 board. :( 

Try to RMA the motherboard and get a Gigabyte GA-G41M-ES2L motherboard.
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

It's about the same price and does support all the latest LGA775 CPU's. And you will be able to do a fair amount of overclocking. :) 

Unfortunately, we are seeing the same problem with Intel boards that we have been seeing with AMD boards - compatibility problems. An older board may support a newer CPU with a BIOS upgrade, or not at all.


This is exactly what I'm going to do! Glad we came to the same conclusion.

Thanks so much guys. I'm going to see what I can do and report back ASAP.

Thanks again!
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