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Losing space on partition

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July 13, 2012 12:36:56 AM

When I built this system, I purchased a 1.5 TB hd. I set aside 50GB for system files thinking that would be plenty. After a few years or so this has slowly but surely filled up.
I tried removing some (150GB) extra space in "D", as this was storage space, and adding to "C", but this would not work. I ended up buying a new 2 TB hd and my college teacher used Gparted and I guess cloned my "C" drive to my "F"..(which is the 150GB I removed from D). The "F" drive which in management reads as 150GB is actually only 50GB.

I am all but out of C space. can someone please help me relieve this pressured space on my drives?

I boot from "C".
"F" is a copy of "C".
"C", "D" and "F" are partitions of a single drive.
"G" and "H" are partitions of a second drive.

please help

Win7 Professional 64-bit
AMD Athalon II X4 620 processor 2.60 GHz
6.00 GB RAM





More about : losing space partition

a c 143 G Storage
July 13, 2012 2:48:10 AM

1) Check the size of your System Restore. It can be at times set at 100%, so it will continue to fill up system restore points. I would recommend keeping it at around 1%.

2) Do a Disk Clean through Windows to delete all your "temporary" files that can keep adding up without you knowing it.

These two should help clean up any unneeded files. Another option is to adjust your Page File to free up space but I wouldn't really recommend that with 6 GB of RAM without verifying your RAM usage.
July 13, 2012 2:57:43 AM

If F is a copy of C, why is it on the same drive? That doesn't make sense.

What I would do..

Move everything from your D and F to your new drive H, then delete the D and F partitions..

Then extend the C drive into the unused space. You can't extend the partition if there is another active partition.. but if there is unused space you can. Once you get it to what you want , create a new D (and F?) partition with what is left, and move the stuff back if you need to.
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a b G Storage
July 13, 2012 3:15:57 AM

1938757,1,1258874 said:
When I built this system, I purchased a 1.5 TB hd. I set aside 50GB for system files thinking that would be plenty. After a few years or so this has slowly but surely filled up.
I tried removing some (150GB) extra space in "D", as this was storage space, and adding to "C", but this would not work. I ended up buying a new 2 TB hd and my college teacher used Gparted and I guess cloned my "C" drive to my "F"..(which is the 150GB I removed from D). The "F" drive which in management reads as 150GB is actually only 50GB.

I am all but out of C space. can someone please help me relieve this pressured space on my drives?

I boot from "C".
"F" is a copy of "C".
"C", "D" and "F" are partitions of a single drive.
"G" and "H" are partitions of a second drive.

please help

Win7 Professional 64-bit
AMD Athalon II X4 620 processor 2.60 GHz
6.00 GB RAM

To solve your problem there are two methods:
Method A- from your screenshot it shows that there are a lot of free space in your "D", maybe you have used the snap-in disk management to release some free space, but you can not add them into your "C" drive, the "extend volume" was grayed out, this problem is caused by the limitation of the disk management, if you want to extend one partition, the unallocated space must be at the end of the target partition, for example: if you want to increase "C", there must be an unallocated space at the end of "C", however, when you release some unallocated space from "D" the unallocated space is at the end of "D" not "C" therefore, you could not add it into "c". To solve this problem, we need other partition software which enable you to "move partition" (then you could move the unallocated space at the end of "C"). The Gparted, AOMEI Partition Assistant Home, and other partition software contains this function. Here is an article about how to solve extend volume grayed out in Windows 7 disk management

Method B-Clone your system partition to "H" and then boot it from Disk 1 (NEW disk), note to apply this method you need to clone both (system reserved partition and C to your partition "H")


a b G Storage
July 13, 2012 3:16:02 AM

Download easeus partition manager. It's free. Delete the F partition. Move D to the end of the drive, and create unused space adjacent to the C partition. Extend the c partition
July 14, 2012 8:23:00 PM

unksol said:
Download easeus partition manager. It's free. Delete the F partition. Move D to the end of the drive, and create unused space adjacent to the C partition. Extend the c partition



Thank you to Unskol and Quiesionboy.
Unskol I had already installed and tried to use Easeus Manager, but never knew how to really use it. It reaffirms my belief that my college computer teacher needs to start looking for another job because I explained the same thing to him with pictures and he opted to just clone the HD rather than move the "D" and merge the "C" with the unallocated space behind it.

Everything is warm and fuzzy and has loads of free space now, thank you both so very much.
a c 363 G Storage
July 15, 2012 2:17:37 AM

The root of the problem is that, although Windows can expand a Partition into Unallocated Space right after the Partition in most cases, it will NOT do this job if the Partition is the boot Partition (containing your OS) OR if the Partition contains the Swap File. This is just Windows being extra cautious to not corrupt a boot Partition and leave you with a dead PC.

There are third-party utilities like Easeus and Partition Magic that will do these jobs for you. However, it is REALLY recommended that you protect yourself from a messed up HDD by making a complete backup before you start, just in case you have to restore it all and try again.

What your college teacher probably did is a common mistake in using cloning software. Many of those tools default to making the cloned copy Partition the SAME SIZE as the original, which is often NOT what you want, and certainly OP did not want that. You can use the cloning software's menus to change the Destination Partition to some other size that you choose, but it appears the teacher did not know about that.
July 15, 2012 5:40:21 AM

Paperdoc said:
The root of the problem is that, although Windows can expand a Partition into Unallocated Space right after the Partition in most cases, it will NOT do this job if the Partition is the boot Partition (containing your OS) OR if the Partition contains the Swap File. This is just Windows being extra cautious to not corrupt a boot Partition and leave you with a dead PC.

There are third-party utilities like Easeus and Partition Magic that will do these jobs for you. However, it is REALLY recommended that you protect yourself from a messed up HDD by making a complete backup before you start, just in case you have to restore it all and try again.

What your college teacher probably did is a common mistake in using cloning software. Many of those tools default to making the cloned copy Partition the SAME SIZE as the original, which is often NOT what you want, and certainly OP did not want that. You can use the cloning software's menus to change the Destination Partition to some other size that you choose, but it appears the teacher did not know about that.



these are the things I want to learn. It has been like pulling teeth trying to get my head around advanced networking, and this teacher is not any help at all. if I could manage to get my A+ and a Win7 or some sort of cert for that Id be happy, I can leave the networking to smarter, higher end minded people...I just love building and tweaking computers.

again thank you for this venue to get help.
!