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Difference between 2 Mushkin 120GB SSD's?

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July 13, 2012 5:58:38 PM

I am buying the last parts for my new tower today and was looking over the SSD forum. I heard that the Mushkin's seem to be very good, especially the Chronos Deluxe versions, but i noticed a huge difference in price between 2 different Mushkin Chronos Deluxe 120GB drives.

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
This one if $115 while...

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
this one is $185.

$70 is a pretty big price difference especially for the same size. Other then the 4k random writes, I can't really see much of a difference. Can someone please enlighten me what the differences are?
a c 504 G Storage
July 13, 2012 6:17:20 PM

One drive has higher IOPS than the other (85,000 vs. 90,000)

Click on the "Details" tab for each drive and look under "Performance".
July 13, 2012 6:29:40 PM

Yes, I saw that, I even mentioned that as that was what my 4k random writes was commenting on.

My question is, is a difference of 5,000 IOPS worth $70 or is there other things that the $185 drive has that makes it the better buy? I'm new to SSD's and am trying to learn why there is such a huge price difference between 2 Mushkin Chromos Deluxe 120GB drives.
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a c 504 G Storage
July 13, 2012 6:36:29 PM

To me personally it isn't worth paying $70 for an extra 5k in IOPS performance. :) 
July 13, 2012 6:55:30 PM

cin19 said:
MKNSSDCR120GB-MX is synchronous-mode MLC NAND.

MKNSSDCR120GB-DX is toggle mode MLC NAND.

toggle is the highest speed NAND. Check the company web-site: http://www.mushkin.com/Digital-Storage/SSDs.aspx

Which is the best, the toggle or the synchronous? I would like to get the one which will be most reliable.
a c 116 G Storage
July 13, 2012 7:11:25 PM

Toggle
July 13, 2012 8:51:30 PM

How does it compare to the Samsung 830?

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a c 116 G Storage
July 13, 2012 10:00:19 PM
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Get the samsung 830 120G, that is the best buy and most reliable and you will love it.

http://www.tigerdirect.com/applications/SearchTools/ite...
July 13, 2012 10:29:29 PM

Does that have the toggle NAND?
a c 257 G Storage
July 14, 2012 8:22:58 AM

Yes, Samsung uses its own toggle NAND. Toggle NAND is expensive so prices are a little higher.

I maintain the ssd database listed in the sticky at the very top of this forum section. Here is the link:

http://www.johnnylucky.org/data-storage/ssd-database.ht...

Scroll down to the Samsung section and you'll see links to technical reviews of the 830.
July 14, 2012 5:04:00 PM

JohnnyLucky said:
Yes, Samsung uses its own toggle NAND. Toggle NAND is expensive so prices are a little higher.

I maintain the ssd database listed in the sticky at the very top of this forum section. Here is the link:

http://www.johnnylucky.org/data-storage/ssd-database.ht...

Scroll down to the Samsung section and you'll see links to technical reviews of the 830.


Thank you :) 
July 14, 2012 5:04:12 PM

Best answer selected by wildkitten.
a b G Storage
July 14, 2012 5:13:47 PM

Dereck47 said:
To me personally it isn't worth paying $70 for an extra 5k in IOPS performance. :) 


dont listen to this guy
a c 257 G Storage
July 14, 2012 5:58:47 PM

cbrunnem said:
dont listen to this guy


In real world use what is the difference in performance between 80,000 IOPS and 85,000 IOPS? Considering that only a few games sometimes hit a peak of 40,000 IOPS for a brief period would a gamer notice the difference?

The marketing department at OCZ thoroughy abused the IOPS benchmark when the Vertex 3 Max IOPS was introduced. OCZ tricked consumers into thinking that more IOPS are better. Over in the enterprise side of the market IOPS is actually a benchmark used to determine how many and what type of storage devices are required for a server in an enterprise network. That's is completely different from an ssd in a desktop pc at home. When comments about IOPS were posted in this forum I kept asking what individuals were doing that required 85,000 IOPS. Nobody could answer that question. They simply believed more is better.

a c 105 G Storage
July 14, 2012 6:06:57 PM

As was pointed out, the Deluxe DX uses premium toshiba toggle mode flash, the other doesn't. This flash lasts 2-3 times as long and is much faster (tier 1 versus Tier 3 in THG rankings)

http://www.tweaktown.com/reviews/4328/mushkin_chronos_d...

Other than a few really oddball entries, SF-2281 'consumer' SSDs come in three flash flavors. Starting on the low end, you have IMFT 25nm asynchronous flash, a budget flash used in the Agility 3, Force 3, Chronos (non-Deluxe model) and a few other drives that in our testing perform at around the same level as last year's SF-1200 controlled drives when filled to 50 percent capacity. .....

Synchronous flash, also called ONFi 2.x is really the first step for enthusiasts, especially now that prices have really dropped. The final flash type used is 3Xnm Toggle Mode flash from Toshiba, a form of ONFi 2.x without the JEDEC classification. 25nm IMFT is rated for around 5K P/E cycles and 3Xnm Toshiba Toggle Mode flash is rated for around twice as many. Even though we are talking about writing a lot of data for a very long time, the 3Xnm flash will still last even longer.

At this time there are very few consumer SSDs that use Toshiba Toggle Flash; you can count those available in the US on one hand - Vertex 3 Max IOPS Edition, Patriot WildFire, OWC Mercury Extreme Pro 6G (240GB capacity size only) and what we looked at today, the Mushkin Enhanced Chronos Deluxe. That said, the Chronos Deluxe is in a very limited class of products right from the gate.

For an extra $15, ($200 price tag) you can double the capacity to 240 GB and see a significant speed increase

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Simply put, on a price / performance / longevity basis, I don't see anything coming close to the Chronos Deluxe 240 GB

Patriot Wildfire is $400
Vertex 3 Max IOPS is $380
Samsung 830 is $275
Intel 520 is $325
Plextor M3 - $250
a b G Storage
July 14, 2012 6:19:20 PM

JohnnyLucky said:
In real world use what is the difference in performance between 80,000 IOPS and 85,000 IOPS? Considering that only a few games sometimes hit a peak of 40,000 IOPS for a brief period would a gamer notice the difference?

The marketing department at OCZ thoroughy abused the IOPS benchmark when the Vertex 3 Max IOPS was introduced. OCZ tricked consumers into thinking that more IOPS are better. Over in the enterprise side of the market IOPS is actually a benchmark used to determine how many and what type of storage devices are required for a server in an enterprise network. That's is completely different from an ssd in a desktop pc at home. When comments about IOPS were posted in this forum I kept asking what individuals were doing that required 85,000 IOPS. Nobody could answer that question. They simply believed more is better.


the guys said that the only difference was the IOPS which is far from true. the read and writes will be different in real world as well.
a c 504 G Storage
July 14, 2012 6:49:05 PM

The advertised Read/Write speeds for the Mushkin Enhanced Chronos Deluxe MX are 560/520.
The advertised Read/Write speeds for the Mushkin Enhanced Chronos Deluxe are 560/515.

You’re not going to recognize a 5MB/s difference in real life performance.

a b G Storage
July 14, 2012 6:58:48 PM

haha you can not rely on reported numbers. the MX is slower then the DX and its not a 5mb/s difference
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