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Minolta Dualscan IV- Will 126 Slides damage the scanner Ph..

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Anonymous
December 12, 2004 7:06:10 AM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.scanners,rec.photo.digital,rec.photo.equipment.35mm,rec.photo.film+labs (More info?)

Help
I have just purchased a Minolta Dualscan IV and have not even installed it
yet. Most of my slides are 35mm but a few are 40 years old and came from a
Kodak Instamatic camera that used 126 Film and some I think are 120 square
Slides from an old twin reflex camera that take up all most all of the slide
save for about 3/8 inch. I know that the scanner was not made for this
older film and may not be able to scan the full slide and that is OK but
will putting this slide in the scanner damage the optics or the scanner
Physically?
Thank you in advance for anyone's thought and guidance on this issue.
Mike
Anonymous
December 12, 2004 7:06:11 AM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.scanners,rec.photo.digital,rec.photo.equipment.35mm,rec.photo.film+labs (More info?)

In this specific case, it shouldn't -- I've got the Scan Elite II, which
basically uses the same feed mechanism. 126 film fits, but gets masked at
the top and the bottom by the holder, and the negative is shorter than a
standard 35mm. The film is the same size, though.

That other film should be OK -- never tried it, but unless it's hanging
out, or so lose it could fall into the scanner you should be ok.

On 11-Dec-04 23:06, Mike Koperskinospam wrote:
> Help
> I have just purchased a Minolta Dualscan IV and have not even installed it
> yet. Most of my slides are 35mm but a few are 40 years old and came from a
> Kodak Instamatic camera that used 126 Film and some I think are 120 square
> Slides from an old twin reflex camera that take up all most all of the slide
> save for about 3/8 inch. I know that the scanner was not made for this
> older film and may not be able to scan the full slide and that is OK but
> will putting this slide in the scanner damage the optics or the scanner
> Physically?
> Thank you in advance for anyone's thought and guidance on this issue.
> Mike
>
>
Anonymous
December 12, 2004 7:06:11 AM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.scanners,rec.photo.digital,rec.photo.equipment.35mm,rec.photo.film+labs (More info?)

I haven't actually used this scanner but I can't imagine 126 slides or 127
"super slides" damaging it as long as they aren't badly bent. If the slide
fits into the same physical space as a 35-mm slide, it should go in and out
just fine. This is based on my experience with other Minolta and Nikon
scanners; I haven't actually used the one you mention.

I rather wish 127 hadn't died out... I never got to use it.

--
Clear skies,

Michael A. Covington
Author, Astrophotography for the Amateur
www.covingtoninnovations.com/astromenu.html


"Mike Koperskinospam" <nospammkoperskinospam@kc.rr.com> wrote in message
news:SsPud.133245$T02.82710@twister.rdc-kc.rr.com...
> Help
> I have just purchased a Minolta Dualscan IV and have not even installed it
> yet. Most of my slides are 35mm but a few are 40 years old and came from
> a
> Kodak Instamatic camera that used 126 Film and some I think are 120 square
> Slides from an old twin reflex camera that take up all most all of the
> slide
> save for about 3/8 inch. I know that the scanner was not made for this
> older film and may not be able to scan the full slide and that is OK but
> will putting this slide in the scanner damage the optics or the scanner
> Physically?
> Thank you in advance for anyone's thought and guidance on this issue.
> Mike
>
>
Anonymous
December 12, 2004 1:41:25 PM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.scanners,rec.photo.digital,rec.photo.equipment.35mm,rec.photo.film+labs (More info?)

Mike Koperskinospam wrote:

> Help
> I have just purchased a Minolta Dualscan IV and have not even installed it
> yet. Most of my slides are 35mm but a few are 40 years old and came from a
> Kodak Instamatic camera that used 126 Film and some I think are 120 square
> Slides from an old twin reflex camera that take up all most all of the slide
> save for about 3/8 inch. I know that the scanner was not made for this
> older film and may not be able to scan the full slide and that is OK but
> will putting this slide in the scanner damage the optics or the scanner
> Physically?

If you can get the film to be well held within the film holder and there is no
chance of it slipping or popping out and getting into the mechanics of the
scanner, then it should work fine.

--
-- r.p.e.35mm user resource: http://www.aliasimages.com/rpe35mmur.htm
-- r.p.d.slr-systems: http://www.aliasimages.com/rpdslrsysur.htm
-- [SI] gallery & rulz: http://www.pbase.com/shootin
-- e-meil: there's no such thing as a FreeLunch.
Anonymous
December 12, 2004 7:46:46 PM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.scanners,rec.photo.digital,rec.photo.equipment.35mm,rec.photo.film+labs (More info?)

"Mike Koperskinospam" <nospammkoperskinospam@kc.rr.com> wrote in message
news:SsPud.133245$T02.82710@twister.rdc-kc.rr.com...
> Help
> I have just purchased a Minolta Dualscan IV and have not even installed it
> yet. Most of my slides are 35mm but a few are 40 years old and came from
> a
> Kodak Instamatic camera that used 126 Film and some I think are 120 square
> Slides from an old twin reflex camera that take up all most all of the
> slide
> save for about 3/8 inch. I know that the scanner was not made for this
> older film and may not be able to scan the full slide and that is OK but
> will putting this slide in the scanner damage the optics or the scanner
> Physically?
> Thank you in advance for anyone's thought and guidance on this issue.
> Mike
>
>
It won't hurt the scanner by putting 126 film into a 35 mm film strip
holder.

Here is a comparsion of 126 film to 35 mm film and 126 film in a Minolta
Scandual IV film holder.
http://www.carlmcmillan.com/Temp

You can scan one frame of 126, move the 126 so that the next frame is fully
in the frame area. Of the six frames that are available, at least one of the
126 frames will show in one of the 35 mm frames with the top of the 126 film
cut off by the 35 mm film holder.

There is also a Kodak Catalog listing of 70 mm film for somebody else.

--
CSM1
http://www.carlmcmillan.com
--
Anonymous
December 13, 2004 5:10:13 AM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.scanners,rec.photo.digital,rec.photo.equipment.35mm,rec.photo.film+labs (More info?)

In rec.photo.digital Michael A. Covington <look@www.covingtoninnovations.com.for.address&gt; wrote:
>I haven't actually used this scanner but I can't imagine 126 slides or 127
>"super slides" damaging it as long as they aren't badly bent. If the slide
>fits into the same physical space as a 35-mm slide, it should go in and out
>just fine. This is based on my experience with other Minolta and Nikon
>scanners; I haven't actually used the one you mention.

>I rather wish 127 hadn't died out... I never got to use it.

I have a Dualscan IV. The only way I know to scan slides
is to put them into the special holder supplied with the
scanner. These hold a 35mm mounted slide in either the
horizontal or vertical positions.

The holder, however, only allows a 35mm area to be exposed to
the scanner.

I doubt that 126 or 127 slides will fit into the scanner.
Sorry, I don't have any that size so that I can't test it
for sure.

---- Paul J. Gans
Anonymous
December 13, 2004 5:10:14 AM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.scanners,rec.photo.digital,rec.photo.equipment.35mm,rec.photo.film+labs (More info?)

"Paul J Gans" <gans@panix.com> wrote in message
news:cpitm5$9iu$1@reader1.panix.com...

> I have a Dualscan IV. The only way I know to scan slides
> is to put them into the special holder supplied with the
> scanner. These hold a 35mm mounted slide in either the
> horizontal or vertical positions.
....
> I doubt that 126 or 127 slides will fit into the scanner.
> Sorry, I don't have any that size so that I can't test it
> for sure.

They are in 2x2-inch cardboard mounts; that is also one of the options for
mounting 110 slides.

That's why I think there's no danger, although the scanner will not be able
to see the whole frame of the 126 or 127 slide. In fact, the holder will
guarantee that the slide or film doesn't bump into anything.
Anonymous
December 13, 2004 12:41:52 PM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.scanners,rec.photo.digital,rec.photo.equipment.35mm,rec.photo.film+labs (More info?)

35mm slides, image measures 24x36mm, slide mount is 2x2 inches.
127 super slides, image is 38mmx38mm, slide mount is 2x2 inches.
126 slides, image measures 26x26mm, slide mount is 2x2 inches.
828 slides, image is 28x40mm, slide mount is 2x2 inches.

You should be able to scan a 24x36mm maximum area from any of these formats
on a 35mm scanner. A medium format scanner could scan the whole image.

--
darkroommike

----------
"Paul J Gans" <gans@panix.com> wrote in message
news:cpitm5$9iu$1@reader1.panix.com...
> In rec.photo.digital Michael A. Covington
<look@www.covingtoninnovations.com.for.address&gt; wrote:
> >I haven't actually used this scanner but I can't imagine 126 slides or
127
> >"super slides" damaging it as long as they aren't badly bent. If the
slide
> >fits into the same physical space as a 35-mm slide, it should go in and
out
> >just fine. This is based on my experience with other Minolta and Nikon
> >scanners; I haven't actually used the one you mention.
>
> >I rather wish 127 hadn't died out... I never got to use it.
>
> I have a Dualscan IV. The only way I know to scan slides
> is to put them into the special holder supplied with the
> scanner. These hold a 35mm mounted slide in either the
> horizontal or vertical positions.
>
> The holder, however, only allows a 35mm area to be exposed to
> the scanner.
>
> I doubt that 126 or 127 slides will fit into the scanner.
> Sorry, I don't have any that size so that I can't test it
> for sure.
>
> ---- Paul J. Gans
>
>
Anonymous
December 13, 2004 12:41:53 PM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.scanners,rec.photo.digital,rec.photo.equipment.35mm,rec.photo.film+labs (More info?)

Mike King wrote:
> 35mm slides, image measures 24x36mm, slide mount is 2x2 inches.
> 127 super slides, image is 38mmx38mm, slide mount is 2x2 inches.
> 126 slides, image measures 26x26mm, slide mount is 2x2 inches.
> 828 slides, image is 28x40mm, slide mount is 2x2 inches.
>
> You should be able to scan a 24x36mm maximum area from any of these
> formats on a 35mm scanner. A medium format scanner could scan the
> whole image.
>

I think you may get more than 24x36mm on some scanners: my primitive but
effective HP PhotoSmart (second version) scanned the full image area of
127 film (if that is what Instamatics used), much to my delight.

--
Frank ess
Anonymous
December 13, 2004 8:14:16 PM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.scanners,rec.photo.digital,rec.photo.equipment.35mm,rec.photo.film+labs (More info?)

"Frank ess" <frank@fshe2fs.com> wrote in message
news:xJ-dnejV3amWWiDcRVn-qw@giganews.com...
> Mike King wrote:
>> 35mm slides, image measures 24x36mm, slide mount is 2x2 inches.
>> 127 super slides, image is 38mmx38mm, slide mount is 2x2 inches.
>> 126 slides, image measures 26x26mm, slide mount is 2x2 inches.
>> 828 slides, image is 28x40mm, slide mount is 2x2 inches.
>>
>> You should be able to scan a 24x36mm maximum area from any of these
>> formats on a 35mm scanner. A medium format scanner could scan the
>> whole image.
>>
>
> I think you may get more than 24x36mm on some scanners: my primitive but
> effective HP PhotoSmart (second version) scanned the full image area of
> 127 film (if that is what Instamatics used), much to my delight.
>
> --
> Frank ess
>

127 Film size varies with the number of frames on the roll.
16 frames 1 13/16 x 1 9/16 inches
12 frames 1 5/8 x 1 5/8 inches
8 frames 1 5/8 x 2 1/2 inches.
127 Super Slide, 2 x 2 mount. Aperture is 38 mm x 38 mm.

126 (the Instamatic Cartridge)
12 or 20 frames.
Frame size is 28 mm x 28 mm. Negatives.
When mounted in a 2 x 2 slide mount the Aperture is 26.5 mm x 26.5 mm.

All of the above from Kodak photographic products 1977-1978. A catalog.

If you have postive film mounted in a 2 x 2 slide mount, some film scanners
will have no problem with whatever film that fits in a 2 x 2 mount.

However my Minolta Scandual IV Slide holder has a 1 1/2 x 1 inch window for
the image.

--
CSM1
http://www.carlmcmillan.com
--
Anonymous
December 13, 2004 8:14:17 PM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.scanners,rec.photo.digital,rec.photo.equipment.35mm,rec.photo.film+labs (More info?)

CSM1 wrote:
> "Frank ess" <frank@fshe2fs.com> wrote in message
> news:xJ-dnejV3amWWiDcRVn-qw@giganews.com...
>> Mike King wrote:
>>> 35mm slides, image measures 24x36mm, slide mount is 2x2 inches.
>>> 127 super slides, image is 38mmx38mm, slide mount is 2x2 inches.
>>> 126 slides, image measures 26x26mm, slide mount is 2x2 inches.
>>> 828 slides, image is 28x40mm, slide mount is 2x2 inches.
>>>
>>> You should be able to scan a 24x36mm maximum area from any of these
>>> formats on a 35mm scanner. A medium format scanner could scan the
>>> whole image.
>>>
>>
>> I think you may get more than 24x36mm on some scanners: my primitive
>> but effective HP PhotoSmart (second version) scanned the full image
>> area of 127 film (if that is what Instamatics used), much to my
>> delight. --
>> Frank ess
>>
>
> 127 Film size varies with the number of frames on the roll.
> 16 frames 1 13/16 x 1 9/16 inches
> 12 frames 1 5/8 x 1 5/8 inches
> 8 frames 1 5/8 x 2 1/2 inches.
> 127 Super Slide, 2 x 2 mount. Aperture is 38 mm x 38 mm.
>
> 126 (the Instamatic Cartridge)
> 12 or 20 frames.
> Frame size is 28 mm x 28 mm. Negatives.
> When mounted in a 2 x 2 slide mount the Aperture is 26.5 mm x 26.5 mm.
>
> All of the above from Kodak photographic products 1977-1978. A
> catalog.
> If you have postive film mounted in a 2 x 2 slide mount, some film
> scanners will have no problem with whatever film that fits in a 2 x 2
> mount.
> However my Minolta Scandual IV Slide holder has a 1 1/2 x 1 inch
> window for the image.
>

Thank you.

I have a few more film strips of equal width, that take up very nearly
the entire width of the film, square frames. They are out of reach right
now. The fellow who sold them to me via eBay didn't remember what kind
of camera he used. Here's a couple:
http://www.fototime.com/BEF369D6F3A3264/orig.jpg

http://www.fototime.com/F6E45CE734FC74A/orig.jpg



Now that I look at the images, it seems to me they are not different
from the (known) Instamatics I mentioned.



--

Frank ess
Anonymous
December 15, 2004 3:06:44 AM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.scanners,rec.photo.digital,rec.photo.equipment.35mm,rec.photo.film+labs (More info?)

To everyone that responded to this thread a big THANK YOU is in order. I
have learned the hard way when you buy something it is good idea to go to
the Products web site and read the FAQ's. Now for the bad news, So I
installed the scanner Software first and did everything by the book and then
guess what the scanner was DOA Dead On Arrival Or also Known as Out Of Box
Failure the scanner would never see or feed the slide tray in. regardless
how far I pushed it in. I tried both Slide and the Negative holder with no
Luck. I purchased the scanner from a Super Store called MICRO-CENTER and
as fate would Have it. I had purchased the last film scanner they had and I
need to get all 436 slides Scanned, printed, and put on CD's before
Christmas. So I traded it in for the most expensive flat bed scanner they
had. An Epson 4870 Photo that has Digital ICE but as all most all the
slides I have are 50 to 30 years old Kodachome I understand that ICE is
worthless on them. I am sure that a Flat bed scanner is not as good as a
true film scanner but as my grandparents took these slides, they were Far
from Professional quality anyhow.

Thanks for everyone's help

P.S.

If you were I and giving copies of slides to your family on CD what
resolution, would you scan them at and would you keep the output at the
original size or like 4x6 inch

Again Thanks

Mike
"Mike Koperskinospam" <nospammkoperskinospam@kc.rr.com> wrote in message
news:SsPud.133245$T02.82710@twister.rdc-kc.rr.com...
> Help
> I have just purchased a Minolta Dualscan IV and have not even installed it
> yet. Most of my slides are 35mm but a few are 40 years old and came from
a
> Kodak Instamatic camera that used 126 Film and some I think are 120 square
> Slides from an old twin reflex camera that take up all most all of the
slide
> save for about 3/8 inch. I know that the scanner was not made for this
> older film and may not be able to scan the full slide and that is OK but
> will putting this slide in the scanner damage the optics or the scanner
> Physically?
> Thank you in advance for anyone's thought and guidance on this issue.
> Mike
>
>
Anonymous
December 15, 2004 3:06:45 AM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.scanners,rec.photo.digital,rec.photo.equipment.35mm,rec.photo.film+labs (More info?)

Mike Koperskinospam wrote:
> To everyone that responded to this thread a big THANK YOU is in
> order. I have learned the hard way when you buy something it is good
> idea to go to the Products web site and read the FAQ's. Now for the
> bad news, So I installed the scanner Software first and did
> everything by the book and then guess what the scanner was DOA Dead
> On Arrival Or also Known as Out Of Box Failure the scanner would
> never see or feed the slide tray in. regardless how far I pushed it
> in. I tried both Slide and the Negative holder with no Luck. I
> purchased the scanner from a Super Store called MICRO-CENTER and as
> fate would Have it. I had purchased the last film scanner they had
> and I need to get all 436 slides Scanned, printed, and put on CD's
> before Christmas. So I traded it in for the most expensive flat bed
> scanner they had. An Epson 4870 Photo that has Digital ICE but as
> all most all the slides I have are 50 to 30 years old Kodachome I
> understand that ICE is worthless on them. I am sure that a Flat bed
> scanner is not as good as a true film scanner but as my grandparents
> took these slides, they were Far from Professional quality anyhow.
>

Plenty of people have said here they get plenty good results on slides
with that scanner.

I seem to remember hearing the recent ICE versions do Old Kodachrome
plenty good.

Your family will love the results, I'm sure.


--
Frank ess
Anonymous
December 15, 2004 8:16:51 AM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.scanners,rec.photo.digital,rec.photo.equipment.35mm,rec.photo.film+labs (More info?)

To everyone that responded to this thread a big THANK YOU is in order. I
have learned the hard way when you buy something it is good idea to go to
the Products web site and read the FAQ's. Now for the bad news, So I
installed the scanner Software first and did everything by the book and then
guess what the scanner was DOA Dead On Arrival Or also Known as Out Of Box
Failure the scanner would never see or feed the slide tray in. regardless
how far I pushed it in. I tried both Slide and the Negative holder with no
Luck. I purchased the scanner from a Super Store called MICRO-CENTER and
as fate would Have it. I had purchased the last film scanner they had and I
need to get all 436 slides Scanned, printed, and put on CD's before
Christmas. So I traded it in for the most expensive flat bed scanner they
had. An Epson 4870 Photo that has Digital ICE but as all most all the
slides I have are 50 to 30 years old Kodachome I understand that ICE is
worthless on them. I am sure that a Flat bed scanner is not as good as a
true film scanner but as my grandparents took these slides, they were Far
from Professional quality anyhow.

Thanks for everyone's help

P.S.

If you were I and giving copies of slides to your family on CD what
resolution, would you scan them at and would you keep the output at the
original size or like 4x6 inch

Again Thanks

Mike


"CSM1" <nomoremail@nomail.com> wrote in message
news:I5kvd.39570$bP2.7281@newssvr12.news.prodigy.com...
>
> "Frank ess" <frank@fshe2fs.com> wrote in message
> news:xJ-dnejV3amWWiDcRVn-qw@giganews.com...
> > Mike King wrote:
> >> 35mm slides, image measures 24x36mm, slide mount is 2x2 inches.
> >> 127 super slides, image is 38mmx38mm, slide mount is 2x2 inches.
> >> 126 slides, image measures 26x26mm, slide mount is 2x2 inches.
> >> 828 slides, image is 28x40mm, slide mount is 2x2 inches.
> >>
> >> You should be able to scan a 24x36mm maximum area from any of these
> >> formats on a 35mm scanner. A medium format scanner could scan the
> >> whole image.
> >>
> >
> > I think you may get more than 24x36mm on some scanners: my primitive but
> > effective HP PhotoSmart (second version) scanned the full image area of
> > 127 film (if that is what Instamatics used), much to my delight.
> >
> > --
> > Frank ess
> >
>
> 127 Film size varies with the number of frames on the roll.
> 16 frames 1 13/16 x 1 9/16 inches
> 12 frames 1 5/8 x 1 5/8 inches
> 8 frames 1 5/8 x 2 1/2 inches.
> 127 Super Slide, 2 x 2 mount. Aperture is 38 mm x 38 mm.
>
> 126 (the Instamatic Cartridge)
> 12 or 20 frames.
> Frame size is 28 mm x 28 mm. Negatives.
> When mounted in a 2 x 2 slide mount the Aperture is 26.5 mm x 26.5 mm.
>
> All of the above from Kodak photographic products 1977-1978. A catalog.
>
> If you have postive film mounted in a 2 x 2 slide mount, some film
scanners
> will have no problem with whatever film that fits in a 2 x 2 mount.
>
> However my Minolta Scandual IV Slide holder has a 1 1/2 x 1 inch window
for
> the image.
>
> --
> CSM1
> http://www.carlmcmillan.com
> --
>
>
Anonymous
December 15, 2004 1:00:53 PM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.scanners,rec.photo.digital,rec.photo.equipment.35mm,rec.photo.film+labs (More info?)

> as fate would Have it. I had purchased the last film scanner they had and I
> need to get all 436 slides Scanned, printed, and put on CD's before
> Christmas. So I traded it in for the most expensive flat bed scanner they

Another easier way as a reminder to those that don't bother to search
www.deja.com for past posts on this topic is to throw the entire lot of
slides at any local photo print shop that has a digital printer (eg.
Noritsu), and simply have them scan it all onto CDs. It'll probably
cost you $0.50-1.00 per frame in bulk, but it's fast (they've got far
faster scanners that do ICE than we do), convenient (you can sleep while
the operator(s) works), and does the job well (they already have been
trained to do color correction, etc. to get you a nice scan).

All of this could have been done and finished by the time you spent
buying one scanner, running back, then getting another and trying to
figure it all out.

--

Another faster way?

Slide adapter attached to the lens of a compatible digital camera.
eg. Nikons often have slide adapters for many of their higher-end models.

Simply feed in slide, push the shutter button, eject and repeat.

This can get you images far faster than most other options by
yourself, and if the top-notch quality (ie. Minolta 5400 ICE'd scans at
top resolution + photoshop retouching & correction) isn't necessary,
then this is the fastest way available for home consumers.

---

Quite a few times this same thing has come up (eg. one guy was asking
about scanning in WWII photos or something like that), so there's many
good solutions that'll get you scans faster and better.
December 15, 2004 8:13:09 PM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.scanners,rec.photo.digital,rec.photo.equipment.35mm,rec.photo.film+labs (More info?)

On Tue, 14 Dec 2004 22:26:59 -0800, "Frank ess" <frank@fshe2fs.com>
wrote:

>I seem to remember hearing the recent ICE versions do Old Kodachrome
>plenty good.

Unfortunately, not always... :-(

LS-50 here, and 1980's Kodachromes still cause ICE to produce ugly
artifacts around problem areas.

On other film, ICE4 on the LS-50 has improved immensely when compared
to ICE(1) on my old LS-30. ICE4 really is "magic".

Don.
!