Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

Gigabyte x48 -- no video

Tags:
  • Motherboards
  • Gigabyte
Last response: in Motherboards
Share
February 19, 2011 8:05:29 AM

Hey guys,

Been troubleshooting my machine for about the past 12 hours.

Here's the specs (relevant):

Gigabyte ga-x48t-dq6 mobo
intel core 2 quad q9450
super talent ddr3 1800 x4 (2x1Gb pairs)
CORSAIR HX Series CMPSU-620HX 620W PS
eVGA geforce 9800gtx // nvidia quatro (used in addition to help troubleshoot)

The situation:

Originally I couldn't get anything out of the board. No beep, no POST, no video. Board power cycles after ~3 sec.

Instantly suspected video card, swapped out for another (quatro), same issue. Used both slots, both cards, no dice. Checked memory seating, properly seated. Checked cabling, all correctly seated. Checked CPU, properly seated, reapplied thermal paste, checked CPU fan and cabling. Removed all components aside from cpu, no change. Checked grounding -- removed mobo from case, no change. Added 1 stick of ram (only 2 sticks would allow for this) and was able to get a beep code and the system would successfully remain powered on. Added ram back one by one, insuring proper pairing, all 4 sticks added and system remains stable. Beep code changed from 1 long, 1 short, to 1 short. Added the quattro back in for video, no video, but not change in beep code. Changed slots, no change. Swapped to 9800gtx, same steps, no change.

I thought it might be the PCI-E slots, but the quattro is only powered by the slot, and it receives power, in both slots. I have yet to snag a regular PCI video card from work to test this out (assuming we have one available), but I'm stretched beyond my knowledge here. I don't have a multimeter to test power to the slots, but as I said, they do receive power, and no beep code changes to indicate an issue. The 9800 receives 2 6-pin power cords from the psu, so I can't gauge anything from that.

I recognize the possibility that both cards may be debunk, however this isn't likely. I have tested both cards previously to verify them, but again, wild things do happen...

I've done as much searching as I can on both this specific mobo model as well as gigabyte in general, and I can't find anything that isn't related. Most deal with faulty psu's, grounding, or bad gpu's. Anyone have any serious insight here? Is it possible the pci-e slots are damaged (but both? really?), or that both cards are dead?

I really need a solid solution, because socket 775 boards of this calibre are just too difficult to find, at least for a reasonable price. I'd like to find something though, as the q9450 still has a lot of life left in it.

All this hardware is relatively new despite it's age. I was in the service for a number of years and hadn't been able to touch it for over a year.

I will try to snag an old PCI vga card tomorrow to test that, as well as a multimeter for the slots. I don't have a reference for the proper power that should be going to them though, if anyone could help out there, should that be a legitimate area to check.

Thanks tons guys and gals (all 2 of you)

More about : gigabyte x48 video

a b V Motherboard
February 19, 2011 3:37:54 PM

Summary: Pull out the CMOS battery and leave it out for a bit to reset the BIOS--might help.

In terms of what's likely broken--it's probably not BOTH video cards or your RAM. It's probably your motherboard or your PSU and probably not the PSU. If you ever do get it to boot up to your bios, check your voltages in the system Health Monitor.

You can try checking this website: http://extreme.outervision.com/PSUEngine to see if your PSU is adequate. Use 15-20% for capacitor aging if your PSU's more than a couple years old.

Obviously, your video is not working. This could be caused by physically broken PCI-e slots or a number of completely broken things on your motherboard. If it's any of that--then it's very hard to fix (baking is a last and bad resort). The only suggestion I really have for you is to reset your BIOS. Hopefully, you just have some setting set wrong and video doesn't work. Unplug your PSU and pull out the CMOS battery. Try to turn it on (while unplugged) then wait 30 seconds, plug it in, and turn it on (Put the CMOS battery back in at any point from here on out). If no video shows up (use whichever card you think is more likely to work), well...I'm sorry. I don't have any other ideas.
m
0
l
February 19, 2011 6:45:42 PM

dalauder said:
Summary: Pull out the CMOS battery and leave it out for a bit to reset the BIOS--might help.

In terms of what's likely broken--it's probably not BOTH video cards or your RAM. It's probably your motherboard or your PSU and probably not the PSU. If you ever do get it to boot up to your bios, check your voltages in the system Health Monitor.

You can try checking this website: http://extreme.outervision.com/PSUEngine to see if your PSU is adequate. Use 15-20% for capacitor aging if your PSU's more than a couple years old.

Obviously, your video is not working. This could be caused by physically broken PCI-e slots or a number of completely broken things on your motherboard. If it's any of that--then it's very hard to fix (baking is a last and bad resort). The only suggestion I really have for you is to reset your BIOS. Hopefully, you just have some setting set wrong and video doesn't work. Unplug your PSU and pull out the CMOS battery. Try to turn it on (while unplugged) then wait 30 seconds, plug it in, and turn it on (Put the CMOS battery back in at any point from here on out). If no video shows up (use whichever card you think is more likely to work), well...I'm sorry. I don't have any other ideas.


Dalauder, Thanks so much for your reply.

As a breakdown response to you:

I've reset the CMOS more times than I can count at this point. I've left it out for days before. I have yet since this issue began, to get it into BIOS, regardless, Stock/ defaults worked on the initial, and no BIOS upgrade was done prior to the current issue. The PSU has seen little use, perhaps 1 years worth at best, with maybe 25% of that time being under load.

For good measure, I snagged a 3rd GPU to test (another PCI-E) and still no dice. I wasn't able to get my hands on a PCI card as of yet, but I'm not too willing to go out and buy one just to troubleshoot this thing.

I'm well past the warranty and RMA period, but perhaps someone knows of either a method to replace the PCI-E slots or has experience in sending their board to Gigabyte for a repair/replacement? I'm not too optimistic considering the aging 775 socket type.

I've been considering just "upgrading" to a Phenom II setup, but really with my budget (especially should the old parts not sell), it's more of a side grade.

I'm still open to suggestions though, I'm not hard pressed to get her back up and running, so I do have time to do some testing. Sooner the better though as it's meant to be apart of a small workstation farm for test bed usage.

Thanks alot guys, and keep the help coming!
m
0
l
Related resources
a b V Motherboard
February 19, 2011 11:23:43 PM

It's pretty tough to get motherboards repaired. But the Q9450 matches the top Phenom II's in performance (including x6's) so it's hard to get rid of it.

You'd have to spend $200 or more to get a CPU with matching performance (I'd wait for the i5-2500K) and another $150 on the motherboard.

The Q9450 is a rare case of last generation where it's difficult to recommend an "upgrade" because it's performance is so good. You'd have to spend a lot before it's actually an upgrade. You could easily find an $80 775 board w/ DDR3 support on newegg--but it would only have one PCI-e slot. It's weird to buy the old stuff--but I think that'll last you another two years of being useful.

If you play games, that system would still get it done very nicely with a good GPU.
m
0
l
February 20, 2011 3:58:10 AM

dalauder said:
It's pretty tough to get motherboards repaired. But the Q9450 matches the top Phenom II's in performance (including x6's) so it's hard to get rid of it.

You'd have to spend $200 or more to get a CPU with matching performance (I'd wait for the i5-2500K) and another $150 on the motherboard.

The Q9450 is a rare case of last generation where it's difficult to recommend an "upgrade" because it's performance is so good. You'd have to spend a lot before it's actually an upgrade. You could easily find an $80 775 board w/ DDR3 support on newegg--but it would only have one PCI-e slot. It's weird to buy the old stuff--but I think that'll last you another two years of being useful.

If you play games, that system would still get it done very nicely with a good GPU.



Indeed. Another great post. I have looked at other offerings for relatively cheep. The trouble is finding a board comparable to my ga-x48t. I had enjoyed previously native 1800 MHz ram, as well as a slew of other features. So, the event here is hard to swallow, but if I can't get the board repaired, I will go this route. I've spotted a solid ASRock for about 90 bucks on the egg that has most of the features I would like, with only marginal compromise. I'm doing some searches for older boards, but they're harder to find and far more pricey.

I think I'll hold onto the Q9450 and make it work. If anything, it gives me an excuse to build from the ground up later on.

Still troubleshooting the board to find the exact cause, and once I find a solution, I'll post that here.

Thanks again!
m
0
l
March 2, 2011 2:44:58 PM

So, the solution is a new board. The thing is dead. Can't tell exactly the cause of it, but none of the slots work. I even got my hands on a PCI video card to test that out.

Seems to me, the QC on these boards, and likely other high end boards, don't go through enough testing to ensure their longetivity, albeit they dont have to though, since most power users are upgrading within 2 years time anyway.

The solution for me will be to buy a cheaper mobo til I'm ready to toss the processor.

Thank for the views and the input. Best wishes.
m
0
l
!