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[solved] moved to Systems>New build

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July 18, 2012 8:39:55 PM

So im completely new to building computers, and all of the technical terms/aspects of it. I've managed to find different components for my build sofar by looking at sites and seeing what other people have put into their rigs that have the same cpu and mobo. Im now looking for internal hard drives and have no clue where to start. Can somebody help?

What hard drive's are compatible with the rig I plan on building?

Sofar my rig includes:
DX79SI mobo
Intel core i7-3930K CPU
Intel BXRTS2011LC Liquid-cooled Thermal Solution For LGA2011 Socket
Ripjaws Z series 16GB (4x4GB) DDR3 1600
1x NVIDIA Geforce GTX 580 GPU (adding a 2nd at a later date)
CORSAIR Professional Series Gold AX750 (CMPSU-750AX) 750W ATX12V 80 PLUS GOLD
Crucial M4 2.5" 256GB SATA III MLC SSD (adding a 2nd at a later date)
Western Digital Caviar WD1002FAEX 1TB 7200 RPM 64MB Cache SATA 6.0Gb/s 3.5" HDD (adding 1-2 more at a later date)
COOLER MASTER Storm Sniper mid tower case
a b G Storage
July 18, 2012 9:07:28 PM

Well everything so far is compatible, and the good news is hard drive compatibility is broad. Any SATA hard drive will work, just find a good capacity for your needs at a good price.

Do you really need a 6-core processor? That Motherboard and CPU are pretty pricey. If this rig is for gaming you can save a lot of money by going with an 1155 socket i5; the 2011 CPUs are really useful for certain professional tasks that need lots of cores, like video rendering. Tell us what you want to do and we can give you suggestions.
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July 18, 2012 9:09:56 PM

Yeah that's all compatible, although you don't need that power supply. That's way overkill unless you plan on getting two more 580s. And pretty much any 3.5" SATA HDD will work with your build, I would get SATA III since your board can take advantage of it. Here's a good one...

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
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a b G Storage
July 18, 2012 9:12:19 PM

This is a great hard drive at a good price:
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168... (SAMSUNG Spinpoint F3 HD103SJ 1TB 7200 RPM 32MB Cache)
or the 500GB alternative http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168... (Samsung by Seagate Spinpoint F3 HD502HJ/ST500DM005 500GB 7200 RPM 16MB Cache)
(don't worry about what version of SATA it uses (sata2 or sata3), they are all inter-compatible, and 3.0Gb/sec is way more than a spinning HDD will ever hit).

As for the power supply, go for http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168... (SeaSonic S12II 620 Bronze 620W) as long as you don't plan on doing SLI.

If you are primarily using the computer for gaming, you can downgrade to an i5 (http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168... or go for 3570k if you want to overclock); i7's enable hyper-threading which does nothing for games because they don't use all the cores on a quad core anyway.

This mobo may be a better/cheaper choice. http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168... (ASUS P8Z77-V LK LGA 1155 Intel Z77 ) Asus tend to be good quality, you don't need to use an intel motherboard, there may be better Mobos available, I just selected this one off the cuff, as there are too many mobos to keep up with. If you want to do overclocking, you'll want to do more research and maybe spend more on the mobo than what I showed for better features.

If you need a case still, a Coolermaster HAF922 (http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...) is a good choice.

For your graphics card, what are you paying for the GTX580 (I'm seeing really high prices on newegg, higher than the new generation of cards), a GTX 670 will run 400$ or so and be much faster (or a 680 if you wanna go for the full monte, but it's really not worth the extra 100$) http://www.newegg.com/Product/ProductList.aspx?Submit=E....
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July 18, 2012 9:26:55 PM

I plan to use this rig for video/audio recording and editing, extensive gaming, picture editing, and everything else I may do in the future. Im just starting out so I wont need all this power just yet, but once I get going im sure it will come in handy.

The reason I wanted things to be at the top end is b/c I don't plan on replacing anything for atleast 6 years, and want what I buy to last.

Im not going to get a 2nd 580 now, but once i've got my rig up and running I'm planing on getting another/or 2.

Also my thinking is that if my stuff is top end now, in a few years when gaming has advanced even more, it should still be good enough to handle it. If buying expensive top end products now can give my rig a long life, then im wiling to do it.

Since im new to all this I know nothing about the hyper-threading but it sounded like it could help from time to time. As for overclocking i've got no clue what that is either, but i've guessed that its along the lines of pushing the hardware to it's limits from what i've read, and if thats what it is, then I don't think I'll be overclocking anytime in the near future.
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July 18, 2012 9:32:19 PM

^Ditto to those on top, although there are some other problems...

1. First of all, do you even need X79? If it's only used for gaming, an i5-3570K will be enough.
2. If you do get X79, don't get an Intel motherboard, they make crappy ones. Get an ASUS one like this:
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
3. GTX 580's are power hogs compared to the newer GTX 670s.
4. Continuing from #3, if you get GTX 670s, you'll be well off with this:
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
Cooler Master isn't a very good brand for PSUs.
5. With a build like that, you should invest in a SSD to store your OS/Games. Here are some of my favorites:
OCZ Vertex 4
Samsung 830
Crucial M4
Then get a HDD and use it to store your other junk.
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a b G Storage
July 18, 2012 9:37:02 PM

For photo and video editing the i7 may pay off, so it may be worth the added cost.

However, I believe the i7 3770 is as fast or possibly faster than the 3930k (it's actually a semi second gen chip, it's not really worth it's cost now that 3rd gen Ivy Bridges are out, or at least that is my understanding).
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Also, I added a few edits to my above post.
For photo/video editing, it may be worth looking at AMD, there has been some talk of Adobe PS using AMDs OpenCL for some real time filtering features. Not sure though.

edit: Also want to point out I recommended a socket 1155 mobo, I overlooked that you had the SandyBridge-E processor, so if you take my mobo advice, you'll also need to get an 1155 processor.
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July 18, 2012 10:15:52 PM

Im having a bit of trouble with these links. They worked the first time but i kept getting a pop-up that tried to take me to newegg.ca (probly b/c im in Canada), and when I closed the links and tried to go to them again, I get error 404 -_- might also be b/c I've got like 15+ tabs open, and a video buffering atm and its starting to storm.

@DjScribbles, I still am looking for a case, and for the setup I'm looking at atm, I've found a couple of cases I think may work, but again since I'm new to all of this I'm only hoping that it would work. http://www.xoxide.com/thermaltake-overseerrxi-case.html & http://www.xoxide.com/azza-solano-1000-black-blue-case....

@fpoon, If I were to stay with the 580, would the PSU you recomended for the 670 still work? Or would I run into problems. Also I've got a Seagate FreeAgent GoFlex 1.5TB external hard drive that I use to backup my system atm. It uses a USB 2.0/3.0 connection. Would that be suitable for storing all my junk?
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July 18, 2012 11:30:54 PM

sol kiwi said:
@fpoon, If I were to stay with the 580, would the PSU you recomended for the 670 still work? Or would I run into problems. Also I've got a Seagate FreeAgent GoFlex 1.5TB external hard drive that I use to backup my system atm. It uses a USB 2.0/3.0 connection. Would that be suitable for storing all my junk?


You could stay with the 580 and maybe even SLI them, but not 3-way.

You can store your stuff on your external hard drive, I'm just recommending a SSD because it has faster read/write times (which means faster boot times and your games faster). Along with that, you can get a 500GB or 1TB hard drive for storing your files.
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July 19, 2012 12:05:36 AM

Whats the difference between an SSD and a Bare-Drive? You recommend an SSD and some of the other hard drives mentioned in earlier posts are Bare-Drive. Is one better than the other, or are they just different. I also noticed that the SSD you mentioned only seem to go up to 512GB, yet the Bare-Drive can be 1TB.
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a b G Storage
July 19, 2012 12:15:20 AM

Bare-drive just means a hard drive shipped without the retail packaging (i.e., just the drive itself). It's a regular hard drive. SSD is a different technology. Hard drives use magnetic disks, SSDs use a number of flash memory chips in an array behind a controller. SSDs are much faster than any regular hard drive.
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a b G Storage
July 19, 2012 12:29:25 AM

With an SSD, your computer will boot in about 20 seconds and be generally more responsive. They are typically smaller storage size, and much more expensive in $/GB, but they are hugely faster for loading files because the have no moving parts.

They are definitely a nice addition to any build. Generally, a 120GB drive is recommended, however 240GB drives have been down in the 150-180$ range recently, making them pretty viable options. Typically, you pair an SSD with an internal HDD for storage (such as games you don't play often, or that don't benefit from fast load times, or finished movies that aren't being edited anymore).


I added product names in my links above so you can find them on newegg Canada.
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a b G Storage
July 19, 2012 12:45:26 AM

sol kiwi said:
So then It's best to get an SSD. Say I had a 100GB SSD and a 100GB hard drive, would the SSD hold more? Or would it hold the same amount but just be able to access the 100GB faster.


It won't hold more, it's just faster. You'll notice that in boot times and program start-up times.
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July 19, 2012 1:26:41 AM

I'm still in need of a case that will work, and I'm not sure what the case specs should be so that it works with my rig. From what I've worked out it looks like the case needs to allow 12.0" x 9.6" (ATX if thats what it is) for the mobo. I'm guessing that the 2.5" for the SSD and the 3.5" for the hard drive indicate the size of the connection, and if I'm right with that I'll need a case that has both internally.

Is there anything else that I need to take into consideration when looking to purchase a case? Obviously it has to be big enough to house everything, but is there anything that the case needs to have in order for the components to work/hook up properly?

Note: Added the SSD and hard drive im thinking of getting in previous post.
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a b G Storage
July 19, 2012 1:45:27 AM

As I posted earlier, a CoolerMaster HAF922 is quite a nice case, I've used one recently for a friend's build and it scores good marks in most of the key categories below. I absolutely hate my current Thermaltake case (an Element G) so I'm a bit inclined to recommend avoiding them. There are no major functional criteria for a case other than size to fit everything. However, there are a lot of things that make a nice case nice:
No sharp edges (usually not a problem above 60 or 70$)
Size (will it fit where you want to put it)
Cable management (Room behind the motherboard to run wires is the key, and cutouts to run them through, places to secure cables with zip ties, zip ties included is nice but a trip to the hardware store solves that)
Airflow (Number of fans, sizes, orientation, etc; also quality of stock fans and noise they make, mesh dust protection)
PSU mounting position (I pref to use bottom mount, because PSUs should be heavy, and keeping them lower is better imo)
Lighting (Want/Don't want, colors, can it be controlled, do they stay off if you turn them off)
Number of HDD (3.5" and 2.5") and Optical (5.25" bays), and their ease of use (Tooless drives, side mounted HDD Rack)
Front Ports (USB 3.0/2.0 ports, Firewire if you need it, Card readers, Audio jacks, etc)
Fan Controller (really kinda pointless imo, mine has it and I never use it)
Side Windows (they can be neat if the case has good cable management, but if it doesn't it's going to look like a mess you'd rather hide)
Removable Motherboard tray (I don't see this often, but it can be sorta handy).
Tool-less design (it's nice to be able to open the case and do minor stuff without a screw driver)



Usually newegg has video tours of cases that can help you check out the case.
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July 19, 2012 1:58:16 AM

Thats exactly the kind of stuff that I wanted to know about choosing a case. I did notice that you mentioned coolermaster for a case, but what I didn't notice was that you said the model also, so when I searched up coolermaster cases I just went to their site instead of searching the specific model. My bad with that. Looking at the HAF922 it seems like a nice case, but I noticed that it says nothing about a 2.5" bay, only 5.25" and 3.5". Would I still be able to use the SSD I've chosen since It's 2.5"? Other then that it looks like it would work.

The mobo has a firewire, 2x USB 3.0/6x USB 2.0, and 5 audio ports all on the rear I/O panel, so would I still need to worry about any of those on the front?

I've decided to go with http://www.newegg.ca/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E1681... for my case.

Does anybody know if 3.5" -> 2.5" bay adapters can be purchased? The case only has a single 3.5" -> 2.5" bay adapter, and in the future I plan on getting another 2.5" SSD.

Sofar my rig includes:
DX79SI mobo
Intel core i7-3930K CPU
Intel BXRTS2011LC Liquid-cooled Thermal Solution For LGA2011 Socket
Ripjaws Z series 16GB (4x4GB) DDR3 1600
1x NVIDIA Geforce GTX 580 GPU (adding a 2nd at a later date)
CORSAIR Professional Series Gold AX750 (CMPSU-750AX) 750W ATX12V 80 PLUS GOLD
Crucial M4 2.5" 256GB SATA III MLC SSD (adding a 2nd at a later date)
Western Digital Caviar WD1002FAEX 1TB 7200 RPM 64MB Cache SATA 6.0Gb/s 3.5" HDD (adding 1-2 more at a later date)
COOLER MASTER Storm Sniper mid tower case
Windows 7 (undecided on which one still, posibly ulitimate though)
looking into monitors atm


Since this is my first build, I don't know what else I would need to buy in order for my rig to work. Can somebody tell me what else I would need to buy before I can use my computer?
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a b G Storage
July 19, 2012 8:09:04 PM

The HAF22 has at least one adapter for the tool-less bays (it may require some screws to attach it to the drive though), as my friend's build used one, it wasn't a hassle. It may have also had a few SSD mounting points drilled in the bottom of the case.


SSDs usually come with the adapters (double check though, not all do). The hard part is knowing if the adapter will work with your drive cage. Worst case scenario, SSDs have no moving parts, and it shouldn't really hurt it to secure it to the bottom of the case.

The front ports are strictly for convenience, such as plugging in a thumbdrive, external HDD, joystick, headset (especially if the cord is too short to reach the back). At least 2 USB ports is nearly a requirement these days, audio is nice to have, firewire i have never even used for anything but if you do use it regularly I'm sure it's nice.
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July 19, 2012 9:20:20 PM

I was going to go with the HAF 922 untill I measured where I was going to put the tower, and then went back to looking for other coolermaster cases that were narrower. I'm very glad you mentioned coolermaster cases or I would still be looking for a case. If I had more room I would be going with the HAF922 since It's a very nice case.

Just found an adapter that should work for converting one of the 3.5" bays into a 2.5".

Thanks to everybody that has taken their time to help me with my build. : )
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