Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

Melting CPU?

Tags:
Last response: in CPUs
Share
August 3, 2010 5:31:19 PM

I recently used a reflow process to fix my broken GTX 260, and it worked rather well. Something I noticed was the the card had an integrated processing unit that lived through the baking process. From this, can we assume that a standard AMD or Intel processor could survive a bake at 400 degrees? I do not plan on doing this, but what is the likelihood of a CPU operating at such temperatures? At what temperature would a CPU begin to melt and halt function due to damage on its interior?

More about : melting cpu

a b à CPUs
August 3, 2010 6:07:51 PM

Xiahoudun32 said:
I recently used a reflow process to fix my broken GTX 260, and it worked rather well. Something I noticed was the the card had an integrated processing unit that lived through the baking process. From this, can we assume that a standard AMD or Intel processor could survive a bake at 400 degrees? I do not plan on doing this, but what is the likelihood of a CPU operating at such temperatures? At what temperature would a CPU begin to melt and halt function due to damage on its interior?


this is what you can do. run PC with open casing. start a cpu intensive game. then remove the cpu cooler and hold a digital thermometer near it and enjoy the fire works. do let us know when u fint the CPU Melting Point :) 

but u cant do it in mordern PC, as it has temp fail safe......:( 

if u have a old PC from late 90s, try it out. or check this video:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3nU_rvVEna4
m
0
l
a c 83 à CPUs
August 3, 2010 6:14:15 PM

Modern systems tend to shut down at 100C(212F) or lower if set in the BIOS. This is done to prevent damage to the processor, so I'm not sure it would survive 400F in the oven.
m
0
l
August 3, 2010 6:51:55 PM

sarwar_r87 said:
this is what you can do. run PC with open casing. start a cpu intensive game. then remove the cpu cooler and hold a digital thermometer near it and enjoy the fire works. do let us know when u fint the CPU Melting Point :) 

but u cant do it in mordern PC, as it has temp fail safe......:( 

if u have a old PC from late 90s, try it out. or check this video:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3nU_rvVEna4



In the video, real damage starts happening around the 250+ Celsius, thats somewhere around 500 in Fahrenheit. 400 isnt a long shot, but survival may still happen, especially considering my GTX 260, and the fact that its processing unit still works
m
0
l
!