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EPS power connector

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June 1, 2010 5:56:20 PM

Hi there!

I have a PSU with a 4 pin EPS power connector but my motherboard has an 8pin connector. So I plugged it in and it apparently
looks like this.

The PC works but shuts down randomly and doesn't turn back on for 5-10 minutes (unless I unplug it). I have tried reinstalling
os, drivers, etc. and no improvement. (It even shut during during os install. So the problem is not in software)
I'm guessing that this connector is causing the problem, because when I click the windows rate my computer button it starts
testing the pc but then shuts down after 2sec. Is this because the power connector isn't supplying enough power to the mobo/cpu?
The wire/connector itself isn't molten or very hot, the psu itself is much hotter.
If I get some sort of convert like this will it solve my problem?
http://www.opentip.com/product_info.php?ref=8955&produc...
or
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
Unfortunately they seem to be pretty rare :/ 

Thanks!

Note: picture was not taken by me

More about : eps power connector

a b V Motherboard
June 1, 2010 10:58:58 PM

What power supply? What motheboard?, What cpu? What ram?
Suggest you run a temperature reading software like (hardware monitor) it's free, and (cpu-z) it's free. It sounds like a temperature issue but need additional information to put it all in perspective.
One more question why isn't there any cpu installed in the picture?
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June 1, 2010 11:35:22 PM

The power supply is 500W HEDY PP500TCA
Mobo is a Gigabyte MA770-UD3
Cpu is Athlon 2 X2 250 3ghz
GFX: ati 4850
RAM: 2×2GB 800mhz

Checking the temps was the first thing I did using (coretemp) and they are completely fine around 50 under heavy load (prime95).
The pc shutsdown during certain games, or certain heavy load.

As I said in the previous Note the pic is just for demonstration, that I found on the internet(not my pc).
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a b V Motherboard
June 2, 2010 4:17:25 AM

kemenyadi said:
Hi there!

I have a PSU with a 4 pin EPS power connector but my motherboard has an 8pin connector. So I plugged it in and it apparently
looks like this.
http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/4pinin8.jpg
The PC works but shuts down randomly and doesn't turn back on for 5-10 minutes (unless I unplug it). I have tried reinstalling
os, drivers, etc. and no improvement. (It even shut during during os install. So the problem is not in software)
I'm guessing that this connector is causing the problem, because when I click the windows rate my computer button it starts
testing the pc but then shuts down after 2sec. Is this because the power connector isn't supplying enough power to the mobo/cpu?
The wire/connector itself isn't molten or very hot, the psu itself is much hotter.
If I get some sort of convert like this will it solve my problem?
http://www.opentip.com/product_info.php?ref=8955&produc...
or
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
Unfortunately they seem to be pretty rare :/ 

Thanks!

Note: picture was not taken by me


The connector is not your problem. I have seen 4 pins kick out 250 watts, which is a TON of cpu power. Assuming its plugged into the correct 4 pins of course. Your issue lies elsewhere.

You need to provide MUCH more info on your system and the problem. This is not enough info to troubleshoot.

Based on what you have provided, your power supply itself is a possibility. Every modern PSU had 4 pins, so its gotta be old. But then again, the system could be too. MORE INFO!!!
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a c 122 B Homebuilt system
a c 156 V Motherboard
June 3, 2010 8:28:57 AM

FALC0N said:

Based on what you have provided, your power supply itself is a possibility. Every modern PSU had 4 pins, so its gotta be old. But then again, the system could be too. MORE INFO!!!

The PSU may be old, but that's a recent motherboard.

The 4 pin plug is inserted correctly. Correct is with the yellow wire facing the board edge.

I googled the PSU, and according to the specifications, it looks as if it is really a 400 watt PSU with a "maximum" output of 500 watts. Max combined 3.3 volt and 5 volt output is 140 watts. Max 12 volt power is 264 watts - or 22 amps, all this at 70% efficiency.

I'd try a better PSU first.
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