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Question about IO Shield Plate...

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June 2, 2010 12:02:31 AM

So I'm in the process of building my first system. I'm installing the mobo right now and I'm kind of confused. The IO shield plate has like a metal "pad" thing on the back. When I try to install the motherboard with this "pad," it doesn't fit (unless I use crazy amounts of force... which could possibly break the motherboard).

Do I have to have this "pad" on, or do I have to remove it? I don't want to screw this up. ;P

More about : question shield plate

June 2, 2010 12:03:44 AM

you need to take the pad off
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a c 84 B Homebuilt system
a c 262 V Motherboard
June 2, 2010 1:39:12 AM

Some shields have springlike tangs which give contact ground to the motherboard. I think the pad serves the same purpose. I don't think I would remove it. Look carefully at how the shield is fitting into the case. It sometimes takes a bit of a push to get the shield fully seated into the case grooves which holds it. Then, make certain that the motherboard parts are not binding and go cleanly through the holes in the shield. A little pressure is normal.
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June 2, 2010 1:44:39 AM

I have an Asus P6x58d premium and it has "springlike tangs" AND the pad. I was scared of applying pressure so I installed it without a shield plate. It went fine except some of the motherboard screws won't tighten... they just keep spinning. This is most likely bad... yes? Did I just short circuit something... lol?
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a c 84 B Homebuilt system
a c 262 V Motherboard
June 2, 2010 2:01:43 AM

1) Put motherboard standoffs only where both the case and motherboard match up.
2) The (brass?) standoffs only need to be finger tight. If you tighten them too much, they can strip threads and spin.
3) Check that you have the proper size screws. Some case screws may look similar but can cause shorts if you use those that are too large. Test the screws with the standoff to make certain that they screw in easily.
4) Do not tighten the motherboard screws too much. Snug is about right.
5) I use a 6" #4 magnetic tip phillips head screwdriver to position the screws and get them started. Just be careful with the magnetic tip.

---no, I doubt that you shorted anything.
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June 2, 2010 2:29:19 AM

geofelt said:
1) Put motherboard standoffs only where both the case and motherboard match up.
2) The (brass?) standoffs only need to be finger tight. If you tighten them too much, they can strip threads and spin.
3) Check that you have the proper size screws. Some case screws may look similar but can cause shorts if you use those that are too large. Test the screws with the standoff to make certain that they screw in easily.
4) Do not tighten the motherboard screws too much. Snug is about right.
5) I use a 6" #4 magnetic tip phillips head screwdriver to position the screws and get them started. Just be careful with the magnetic tip.

---no, I doubt that you shorted anything.


Alright... it turns out I was using the wrong screws... they were too small. I took them out and replaced them with the proper ones. Everything SEEMS fine. I also didn't put in the io shield plate... Could I just tape it OVER the back of the case?
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June 2, 2010 2:31:18 AM

i used a p6x58d-e.

you need to apply a bit of pressure to install the q shield...or at least i needed to (maybe i was doing it wrong? :o ) I don't assume I was though since it works fine now(well, except for a cold booting problem but i dont think that relates to the q shield)
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a c 84 B Homebuilt system
a c 262 V Motherboard
June 2, 2010 4:30:53 AM

You have an expensive piece of hardware. Do it right.

The I/o shield can be important. It helps with grounding, stops rf frequencies, supports the connectors, keeps dust out, promotes proper airflo...etc.

The metal fins on the I/O shield ground the I/O connectors to the case and they will offer some resistance to the mainboard when it is placed. This is natural. Just manipulate and push the mainboard toward the I/O shield until the I/O device connectors protrude and the mainboard holes line up with the case standoffs.

I find it easiest to do if you have three hands. One to push the motherboard towards the shield, a second to hold the screw, and the third to turn the screw. Hence my suggestion to use a magnetic tip screwdriver since I only have two hands.
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a c 122 B Homebuilt system
a c 156 V Motherboard
June 3, 2010 8:46:23 AM

geofelt said:

5) I use a 6" #4 (??) magnetic tip phillips head screwdriver to position the screws and get them started. Just be careful with the magnetic tip.

I think you mean "#2". A #4 Phillips is a really big screwdriver. :) 
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a c 84 B Homebuilt system
a c 262 V Motherboard
June 3, 2010 10:16:49 AM

jsc said:
I think you mean "#2". A #4 Phillips is a really big screwdriver. :) 

RIGHT!!
It is a #2 6" screwdriver.
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a b V Motherboard
June 3, 2010 7:47:57 PM

I find the magnetic screwdrive can pluck the screw from where my fat fingers can't go.
Back to topic, Almost every build I have problems with the i/o panel. Make sure your inserting it in the correct direction. (springy tabs toward MoBo) get one of the long sides into place, put pressure on the short sides until just the long side is left, then a bit of pressure to snap the other long side in.
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