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Need advice and help on HP Pavillion laptop's power socket..

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  • Laptops
  • Hewlett Packard
  • Socket
  • Power
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Anonymous
a b D Laptop
a b α HP
October 13, 2004 8:07:04 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

I have a two year old HP Pavillion that is out of warranty. The DC
socket at the back is loose. As a result, the AC power adaptor is not
making contact most of the time. If I hold the plug, the battery will
charge up. If I let go of the power plug, the battery eventually get
drained. It is definitely a mechanical problem, a soldering iron may
fix it up.

My laptop is like a toaster oven, it is very hot especially during the
recharging of the battery. I wonder if the heat melted something near
the socket to make it come loose. Is this problem common to HP
laptops?

I tried to open up the laptop, I removed all screws on the bottom,
something seems to stick. Is there any website with some graphics to
show where all the screws are, especially any hidden ones?

After the failed attempt, I tried the professionals. I followed HP
Customer Support's advice and took the machine to Best Buy, CompUSA,
MicroCenter. I even tried Fry's. All the answers are similar. I
probably need a new mother board for the loosen socket. That would
cost me over $900 for part only, snap on the labor, I would be
spending over a grand on just a stupid connection problem. Some store
said they cannot give me an estimate, but sending the Laptop out to
their service vendor has a minimum charge of $600. Another store
offered a $99 investigation fee that does not apply to any repair that
may follow.

If it is a major problem, expensive repair is expected. But for minor
issue like a power socket, I didn't expect such a high fee.

I have considered other options.

1. buy a docking station that will supply the power via the bottom,
not the socket. But I am not sure if a docking station will actually
recharge the battery or does it just supply the power to the hardware
directly? If latter, then my laptop will never be portable again.
Anyone know the answer?

2. open up the chassis and tried to fix the socket. In the worst
case, if the socket is beyond repair or it is not replacable without
swapping the mother board. I don't mind soldering a dongle type
socket as long as I can plug in the AC adaptor. I cannot do this
without figuring out how to open up the laptop.

Any pointers are greatly appreciated.

Please post response, my email address often fails.

More about : advice pavillion laptop power socket

Anonymous
a b D Laptop
a b α HP
October 14, 2004 3:09:21 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

caloonese@yahoo.com (Caloonese) wrote in message news:<ee67c74a.0410131507.bdcb39c@posting.google.com>...
> I have a two year old HP Pavillion that is out of warranty. The DC
> socket at the back is loose. As a result, the AC power adaptor is not
> making contact most of the time. If I hold the plug, the battery will
> charge up. If I let go of the power plug, the battery eventually get
> drained. It is definitely a mechanical problem, a soldering iron may
> fix it up.
>
> My laptop is like a toaster oven, it is very hot especially during the
> recharging of the battery. I wonder if the heat melted something near
> the socket to make it come loose. Is this problem common to HP
> laptops?
>
> I tried to open up the laptop, I removed all screws on the bottom,
> something seems to stick. Is there any website with some graphics to
> show where all the screws are, especially any hidden ones?
>
> After the failed attempt, I tried the professionals. I followed HP
> Customer Support's advice and took the machine to Best Buy, CompUSA,
> MicroCenter. I even tried Fry's. All the answers are similar. I
> probably need a new mother board for the loosen socket. That would
> cost me over $900 for part only, snap on the labor, I would be
> spending over a grand on just a stupid connection problem. Some store
> said they cannot give me an estimate, but sending the Laptop out to
> their service vendor has a minimum charge of $600. Another store
> offered a $99 investigation fee that does not apply to any repair that
> may follow.
>
> If it is a major problem, expensive repair is expected. But for minor
> issue like a power socket, I didn't expect such a high fee.
>
> I have considered other options.
>
> 1. buy a docking station that will supply the power via the bottom,
> not the socket. But I am not sure if a docking station will actually
> recharge the battery or does it just supply the power to the hardware
> directly? If latter, then my laptop will never be portable again.
> Anyone know the answer?

I have a Fujitsu notebook where the power jack stopped working, and I
charge it via the docking station. It's too old to spend money on, and
the batteries don't hold much of a charge so I'm not spending $150 on
a new battery. It's not portable, but I don't use it much anyway. I
can't imagine that any docking station would not also charge the
battery, there is just no reason to make it this way.

The stores you went to have no interest in doing anything but swapping
boards. You'll have to do it yourself.

Look for hidden screws, under latches, under slide thingees that you
slide to release the battery, inside where the hard drive, SO-DIMMs,
and Mini-PCI cards go, underneath flip up legs, under glued on rubber
pads, etc. On one notebook I recently disassembled, there were screws
on the bottom that allowed the keyboard to lift out, then there were
additional screws under the keyboard that had to be removed for the
bottom to open.

Taking apart a notebook can be a harrowing experience the first few
times, with myriad tiny cables inside that use fragile connectors.
There are often several different types of screws, some with the same
threading, but different lengths. Once you've opened it, you're only
halfway there, since to re-solder the connector (if it is a
through-hole connector rather than a surface-mount) means going
further, and taking out the motherboard, which meads more cable
removal. Take digital pictures, and label things, including a map of
where each screw goes (tape them to drawing of the bottom and inside).

The surface mount power connectors are a pain. I've had them come
loose in cell phones, and have been able to open the phone to resolder
them (but it's so common that someone wrote up detailed instructions).
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
a b α HP
October 14, 2004 9:55:06 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

Thank you very much for your advices. I'll definitely make use some
of them, like taking digital photos and taping screws onto a drawing
etc.

My concern is the proper procedures to open the case, like where to
ply, in which angle, in which order etc. Forcing something open may
break things.

I searched HP website for Pavillion xt395. I could find other
information for the model, but no disassembly instructions. I was
hoping that there is a picture guide somewhere.




scharf@hotmail.com (Steven Scharf) wrote in message news:<4f153f94.0410141009.5e388755@posting.google.com>...

> I have a Fujitsu notebook where the power jack stopped working, and I
> charge it via the docking station. It's too old to spend money on, and
> the batteries don't hold much of a charge so I'm not spending $150 on
> a new battery. It's not portable, but I don't use it much anyway. I
> can't imagine that any docking station would not also charge the
> battery, there is just no reason to make it this way.
>
> The stores you went to have no interest in doing anything but swapping
> boards. You'll have to do it yourself.
>
> Look for hidden screws, under latches, under slide thingees that you
> slide to release the battery, inside where the hard drive, SO-DIMMs,
> and Mini-PCI cards go, underneath flip up legs, under glued on rubber
> pads, etc. On one notebook I recently disassembled, there were screws
> on the bottom that allowed the keyboard to lift out, then there were
> additional screws under the keyboard that had to be removed for the
> bottom to open.
>
> Taking apart a notebook can be a harrowing experience the first few
> times, with myriad tiny cables inside that use fragile connectors.
> There are often several different types of screws, some with the same
> threading, but different lengths. Once you've opened it, you're only
> halfway there, since to re-solder the connector (if it is a
> through-hole connector rather than a surface-mount) means going
> further, and taking out the motherboard, which meads more cable
> removal. Take digital pictures, and label things, including a map of
> where each screw goes (tape them to drawing of the bottom and inside).
>
> The surface mount power connectors are a pain. I've had them come
> loose in cell phones, and have been able to open the phone to resolder
> them (but it's so common that someone wrote up detailed instructions).
Related resources
October 15, 2004 3:57:41 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

Steven Scharf wrote:
> Taking apart a notebook can be a harrowing experience the first few
> times, with myriad tiny cables inside that use fragile connectors.
> There are often several different types of screws, some with the same
> threading, but different lengths. Once you've opened it, you're only
> halfway there, since to re-solder the connector (if it is a
> through-hole connector rather than a surface-mount) means going
> further, and taking out the motherboard, which meads more cable
> removal. Take digital pictures, and label things, including a map of
> where each screw goes (tape them to drawing of the bottom and inside).

Taking good quality digital photos and writing notes are very sensible
suggestions.
The last notebook I repaired for this problem required the removal of 40
(yes 40) screws to completely remove the motherboard.
Repairing the socket took all of 3 minutes, but putting all the screws
back in the right place was amusing...

Other useful suggestions include minimizing the static/ESD risk and
*not* bending the motherboard when removing it.
If disassembly requires the removal of the CPU heatsink, obviously use
fresh thermal transfer material on reassembly.

Lee
--
Email address is valid, but is unlikely to be read.
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
a b α HP
October 21, 2004 12:08:05 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

On 13 Oct 2004 16:07:04 -0700, caloonese@yahoo.com (Caloonese) wrote:

>
>I tried to open up the laptop, I removed all screws on the bottom,
>something seems to stick. Is there any website with some graphics to
>show where all the screws are, especially any hidden ones?
>
>
>2. open up the chassis and tried to fix the socket. In the worst
>case, if the socket is beyond repair or it is not replacable without
>swapping the mother board. I don't mind soldering a dongle type
>socket as long as I can plug in the AC adaptor. I cannot do this
>without figuring out how to open up the laptop.
>
>Any pointers are greatly appreciated.
>
>Please post response, my email address often fails.

Caloonese;

Coincidence... I have the SAME laptop with the same problem. In fact,
at first I thought it was just a battery and purchased a new one (not
inexpensive) and it wouldn't even work. Faced with the same options
as you I also tried to disassemble the unit. While I could get the
keyboard off, the LCD panel off and most of the other covers, I could
NOT get the entire unit free from the case.

My unit will work if the DC cable is plugged in just right and NOT
moved (otherwise it shuts off instantly).

Here is what I am planning to do. Somehow, after figuring out how to
access the rear of the MB, I plan on desoldering the power jack and if
possible remove it. Then I will solder to the same points a short
"pigtail" which will exit out the original socket hole. At the end of
the pigtail I will mount a female in-line socket into which the
external plug will fit. Then my AC connection should work fine and
not depend on the onboard socket.

Now, many weeks ago I read here that on HP's site they have a pdf file
of the maintenance or users guide for this series of notebooks. And
supposedly in that document is a detailed pictorial on how to
disassemble to case to get at internal parts. I haven't found it
myself but will continue my search. If I find it I will post the URL
to this site. Also, if you find it first, please do the same. And
what ever you do to remedy this problem, please post here as many of
us are very interested.

BTW - in lieu of purchasing a replacement MB (as you stated $$$) I
actually purchased an Apple iBook for the same $$$ which, believe it
or not, is much more robust and usable than the HP was. I just need
to fix the HP because I have another use for it as everything else
about it is fine... just the socket is broken.

Good luck,

Bob
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
a b α HP
October 21, 2004 5:22:56 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

Thanks for the suggestions. After talking to many people, I found
that this is a very common problem regardless of brand name. Since
the DC plug is used almost everyday unless you have a docking station,
it will come loose just in a matter of time.

I am upset that the laptop manufacturers do not address this common
problem. Perhaps they just want you to buy a new one every two years.
IMO, the socket should be a replacable unit. e.g. remove a screw and
replace a new one when it is broken. Since a replacable socket will
be disconnected once every two years or longer, the problem will not
occur at the socket-to-motherboard contact, the weakness will only
occur at the plug-to-socket contact which should be cheap to replace.

I have gone thru over 10 people at HP support in a 90 minutes marathon
on the phone. I got transfered from one department to the next.
Finally, I got to a person who was very helpful and told me that he
found a trainning video clip on how the machine is disassembled and
reassembled. I thought I hit a jackpot when he said he could email me
the link. It turned out that the trainning material was available to
internal people only and the link was not accessible outside HP. I
requested to get the file from him, but he said the video is not in a
downloadable format (perhaps require streaming or something.) So I was
back to square one.

I agree with you that using the dongle approach is better because I
don't need to worry about finding the socket that fits the tight spot.
I bought the dongle from Radio Shack for $2.50. The remaining hurdle
is still opening the case, so that I can solder the pigtail wire onto
the mother board.

HP does have a pdf files on how to open other model of laptops. They
just don't have anything on my particular model. As last resort, I
will try to use the other model's instructions as a guide to my own
adventure.

Until I could open the case sucessfully, I am still considering the
option of buying a docking station. A simple HP docking station is
around $70 to $150 on the Internet, but I cannot confirm if the model
is compatible with my model. Especially when HP have two quite
different line of products after their merger with Compaq. The
trouble is the Pivillion xt395 seems to be a special edition machine
and its compatibility is not well publicized. Do you happen to know
which docking station is compatible with this machine?

I emailed the question to HP support last week. They didn't reply.

I will add to this thread if I made any progress.

Bob_M <r.mariotti@financialdatacorp.com> wrote in message news:<1098317233.ZyBQUG+fzRdT+lvvSMfjsA@teranews>...
> On 13 Oct 2004 16:07:04 -0700, caloonese@yahoo.com (Caloonese) wrote:
>
> >
> >I tried to open up the laptop, I removed all screws on the bottom,
> >something seems to stick. Is there any website with some graphics to
> >show where all the screws are, especially any hidden ones?
> >
> >
> >2. open up the chassis and tried to fix the socket. In the worst
> >case, if the socket is beyond repair or it is not replacable without
> >swapping the mother board. I don't mind soldering a dongle type
> >socket as long as I can plug in the AC adaptor. I cannot do this
> >without figuring out how to open up the laptop.
> >
> >Any pointers are greatly appreciated.
> >
> >Please post response, my email address often fails.
>
> Caloonese;
>
> Coincidence... I have the SAME laptop with the same problem. In fact,
> at first I thought it was just a battery and purchased a new one (not
> inexpensive) and it wouldn't even work. Faced with the same options
> as you I also tried to disassemble the unit. While I could get the
> keyboard off, the LCD panel off and most of the other covers, I could
> NOT get the entire unit free from the case.
>
> My unit will work if the DC cable is plugged in just right and NOT
> moved (otherwise it shuts off instantly).
>
> Here is what I am planning to do. Somehow, after figuring out how to
> access the rear of the MB, I plan on desoldering the power jack and if
> possible remove it. Then I will solder to the same points a short
> "pigtail" which will exit out the original socket hole. At the end of
> the pigtail I will mount a female in-line socket into which the
> external plug will fit. Then my AC connection should work fine and
> not depend on the onboard socket.
>
> Now, many weeks ago I read here that on HP's site they have a pdf file
> of the maintenance or users guide for this series of notebooks. And
> supposedly in that document is a detailed pictorial on how to
> disassemble to case to get at internal parts. I haven't found it
> myself but will continue my search. If I find it I will post the URL
> to this site. Also, if you find it first, please do the same. And
> what ever you do to remedy this problem, please post here as many of
> us are very interested.
>
> BTW - in lieu of purchasing a replacement MB (as you stated $$$) I
> actually purchased an Apple iBook for the same $$$ which, believe it
> or not, is much more robust and usable than the HP was. I just need
> to fix the HP because I have another use for it as everything else
> about it is fine... just the socket is broken.
>
> Good luck,
>
> Bob
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
a b α HP
October 21, 2004 7:41:46 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

I've taken a part a great many notebooks at work. Rarely is it necessary to
force anything. Occasionally you need to bend some plastic a little bit to
free the audio connector barrel from the case. Whenever it feels like
something needs to be forced, there is another hidded screw somewhere. On
one unit, I had to take the entire system apart, and remove the motherboard,
to change the SO-DIMM.

"Caloonese" <caloonese@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:ee67c74a.0410141655.69a5ce34@posting.google.com...
> Thank you very much for your advices. I'll definitely make use some
> of them, like taking digital photos and taping screws onto a drawing
> etc.
>
> My concern is the proper procedures to open the case, like where to
> ply, in which angle, in which order etc. Forcing something open may
> break things.
>
> I searched HP website for Pavillion xt395. I could find other
> information for the model, but no disassembly instructions. I was
> hoping that there is a picture guide somewhere.
>
>
>
>
> scharf@hotmail.com (Steven Scharf) wrote in message
news:<4f153f94.0410141009.5e388755@posting.google.com>...
>
> > I have a Fujitsu notebook where the power jack stopped working, and I
> > charge it via the docking station. It's too old to spend money on, and
> > the batteries don't hold much of a charge so I'm not spending $150 on
> > a new battery. It's not portable, but I don't use it much anyway. I
> > can't imagine that any docking station would not also charge the
> > battery, there is just no reason to make it this way.
> >
> > The stores you went to have no interest in doing anything but swapping
> > boards. You'll have to do it yourself.
> >
> > Look for hidden screws, under latches, under slide thingees that you
> > slide to release the battery, inside where the hard drive, SO-DIMMs,
> > and Mini-PCI cards go, underneath flip up legs, under glued on rubber
> > pads, etc. On one notebook I recently disassembled, there were screws
> > on the bottom that allowed the keyboard to lift out, then there were
> > additional screws under the keyboard that had to be removed for the
> > bottom to open.
> >
> > Taking apart a notebook can be a harrowing experience the first few
> > times, with myriad tiny cables inside that use fragile connectors.
> > There are often several different types of screws, some with the same
> > threading, but different lengths. Once you've opened it, you're only
> > halfway there, since to re-solder the connector (if it is a
> > through-hole connector rather than a surface-mount) means going
> > further, and taking out the motherboard, which meads more cable
> > removal. Take digital pictures, and label things, including a map of
> > where each screw goes (tape them to drawing of the bottom and inside).
> >
> > The surface mount power connectors are a pain. I've had them come
> > loose in cell phones, and have been able to open the phone to resolder
> > them (but it's so common that someone wrote up detailed instructions).
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
a b α HP
October 21, 2004 9:10:06 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

A lot of the plastic parts needs to be arched upward because there may
be a pair of tab that push into a slot somewhere. Without knowing
where the slots are located, it is hard to tell where to pry the part.

In some other cases, especially in tightly packed laptops, the parts
are overlapping in certain order, you can open part B until you remove
part A. All the secret procedures is impossible to guess without a
repair manual.

Any experience in taking a HP pivillion apart?


"Steven M. Scharf" <scharf.steven@linkearth.net> wrote in message news:<_MQdd.3190$%h1.470@newsread3.news.pas.earthlink.net>...
> I've taken a part a great many notebooks at work. Rarely is it necessary to
> force anything. Occasionally you need to bend some plastic a little bit to
> free the audio connector barrel from the case. Whenever it feels like
> something needs to be forced, there is another hidded screw somewhere. On
> one unit, I had to take the entire system apart, and remove the motherboard,
> to change the SO-DIMM.
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
a b α HP
October 22, 2004 5:06:47 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

I have one of the HP pdf's available. It is titled Omnibook XE3. Much of
the information is also applicable to my Pavilion N5295.

My Pavilion had the same power socket problem. I replaced the socket on the
board. I didn't realize at first that there are connections on both sides
of the board for the B+ connection. This is important, so pay attention
when you solder yours.

I will post the pdf to this site for a couple of weeks so anyone interested
can grab it:

http://bkos.home.infionline.net/XE3.pdf

Good luck with your machine
November 1, 2004 12:10:19 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

Bob Kos,

I read in your posting that you replaced the DC socket in that H/P
laptop. A freiend of mine has the same problem. I removed the broken
socket and am looking for a replacement.

Did you get it from H/P? I've found a few that are close, but none
that seem to be an "identical" replacement for the original.

Please let me know where you got your's and how it's been working
out.

THANKS!!


TCG
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
a b α HP
November 9, 2004 8:04:17 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

I have an HP Pavilion XH635, and have the exact same problem, I will
soon be taking my computer apart AGAIN to put the plug back to where
it belongs, as I haven't gained the nerve to re-sauder the plug back
to the motherboard. Anyway, I was looking for the site I had found the
first time to take the computer apart, and found this forum, which it
looks like you are having the same problem, and taking these things
apart is no easy feat -- but your computer is around the same age as
mine, so they are probably similar in style, and this site has
pictures which allowed me to be able to take my computer apart and
push the plug back into its little hole so that the connection was
where it was supposed to be again instead of wobbling around in there.


http://cif.rochester.edu/~greg/hardware/hp_pavilion_n54...

The computer model in this site is not identical to mine, but the
procedure turned out to be the same..... just make sure you remember
where all the screws go, and if you are afraid that you might not
remember, take pictures with either a polaroid or a digital camera
depending on what you have available, or put them in envelopes
labelled with where they go. And I'm sure most everyone here knows
this, but by all means, DON'T pull on cables by the cable part, or
you'll be replacing more than just a power jack. Hope you find the
site helpful!
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
a b α HP
November 11, 2004 2:54:41 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

I chickened out. Instead of opening the laptop to operate on the
socket, I bought a port replicator which plugs into to bottom of the
laptop. The device provides many ports and most important of all, a
fresh DC-in socket.

My laptop is slightly bulkier with the replicator on its back, but the
battery charging is working perfectly now.

It took me a month to reach this solution. The main reason was the
lack of info regarding this xt395 model. The other reason was my
attempt to look for alternatives. The third was the low support
quality from HP. The HP personnel were courteous and willing to help.
However these people don't know much. They passed me from department
to department because they wanted me to ask someone else. I literally
spent a few hours in total with HP support including all the holding
time on the 1-800 number. HP probably can save millions in phone bill
if they train their people better.

When I asked them which model of docking station is compatible with my
model, they gave me answer. But when I asked how sure she was about
the part number because my xt395 often is not found on the Internet.
Instead of a firm answer, she back off and transferred me to another
department for answer, then my phone line dropped off during the wait.
The HP support was not too helpful, but at least she gave me a
starting point.

I search by the part number and found a seller on eBay. In fact, she
seems to be the only store sell this part nowadays. I got all my
answers from this seller. Now, my laptop is back alive with the dock.

For those who have this problem with the HP laptops, and if your
laptop has a docking port at the bottom, you can buy an HP F4811A or
F4811B. Most product descriptions say the B version is USB2.0
capable. However the seller said, both A or B are actually the same
device, just different part numbers so that different channels can
sell them at different prices. They made you believe you are paying
$20 more for the USB 2.0 over the USB 1.1. Since my laptop is only
USB 1.1 capable, I have no way to verify if the "A" version I bought
is also 2.0 capable as claimed. The good thing is that the A version
costs $20 less in price. Even at the place I bought from, the B
version is more expensive.

I bought mine from www.techexcess.net thru "eBay stores" and they seem
to be quite knowledgable about the items they sell. The funny thing
is that they have the same item on multiple listings on eBay with
different prices. I picked the cheapest one and it works just fine.

So to recap my experience.
Problem: DC-in socket loosen and fails to charge battery.
Options:
1. replace the socket, i.e. replace the mother board. costs $900+
2. open the laptop and solder a dongle to provide a new DC-in socket.
costs $2.50 at Radio Shack and some sweating when the machine undergo
a surgery.
3. buy a docking station that can charge the laptop, costs below $80.

I took #3.




Bob_M <r.mariotti@financialdatacorp.com> wrote in message news:<1098317233.ZyBQUG+fzRdT+lvvSMfjsA@teranews>...
> On 13 Oct 2004 16:07:04 -0700, caloonese@yahoo.com (Caloonese) wrote:
>
> >
> >I tried to open up the laptop, I removed all screws on the bottom,
> >something seems to stick. Is there any website with some graphics to
> >show where all the screws are, especially any hidden ones?
> >
> >
> >2. open up the chassis and tried to fix the socket. In the worst
> >case, if the socket is beyond repair or it is not replacable without
> >swapping the mother board. I don't mind soldering a dongle type
> >socket as long as I can plug in the AC adaptor. I cannot do this
> >without figuring out how to open up the laptop.
> >
> >Any pointers are greatly appreciated.
> >
> >Please post response, my email address often fails.
>
> Caloonese;
>
> Coincidence... I have the SAME laptop with the same problem. In fact,
> at first I thought it was just a battery and purchased a new one (not
> inexpensive) and it wouldn't even work. Faced with the same options
> as you I also tried to disassemble the unit. While I could get the
> keyboard off, the LCD panel off and most of the other covers, I could
> NOT get the entire unit free from the case.
>
> My unit will work if the DC cable is plugged in just right and NOT
> moved (otherwise it shuts off instantly).
>
> Here is what I am planning to do. Somehow, after figuring out how to
> access the rear of the MB, I plan on desoldering the power jack and if
> possible remove it. Then I will solder to the same points a short
> "pigtail" which will exit out the original socket hole. At the end of
> the pigtail I will mount a female in-line socket into which the
> external plug will fit. Then my AC connection should work fine and
> not depend on the onboard socket.
>
> Now, many weeks ago I read here that on HP's site they have a pdf file
> of the maintenance or users guide for this series of notebooks. And
> supposedly in that document is a detailed pictorial on how to
> disassemble to case to get at internal parts. I haven't found it
> myself but will continue my search. If I find it I will post the URL
> to this site. Also, if you find it first, please do the same. And
> what ever you do to remedy this problem, please post here as many of
> us are very interested.
>
> BTW - in lieu of purchasing a replacement MB (as you stated $$$) I
> actually purchased an Apple iBook for the same $$$ which, believe it
> or not, is much more robust and usable than the HP was. I just need
> to fix the HP because I have another use for it as everything else
> about it is fine... just the socket is broken.
>
> Good luck,
>
> Bob
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
a b α HP
November 12, 2004 11:04:58 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

DC connectors in laptops are an across the board problem. If you need
help just yell. ken@ikenfixit.com
!