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Question regarding USB Hub

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August 4, 2010 3:37:48 PM

I got myself a USB Hub that can be powered both from a USB and/or a house power line. I am aware of the fact that a USB-powered USB Hub might not be enough to provide power to all connected USB devices, so most of the time, I connect the additional house power line as well.

However, I noticed that some hardware do not respond correctly even full power is provided. For instance, my logitech mouse does not have its optical light turn on very few times. My Wacom Bamboo also seems to respond a tiny bit slower than usual. It seems that the USB Hub cannot really provide 100% functionality of connected devices.

Is it possible to have a USB hub to provide such feature, or is it impossible due to hardware limitation of a single USB Port?

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August 4, 2010 6:42:30 PM

Its due to the limitation of the USB hub. I have USB flash drives, Logitech gaming mouse, and USB keyboard plugged into my USB hub. So far, it seems to work ok.

However, if I plug in an external hard disk to the USB hub, I get a warning stating that there are other faster USB ports on my computer to provide me with better performance (other than the USB hub).

As you correctly stated, never use the USB port to power anything including the USB hub (few exceptions to this).
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August 4, 2010 7:12:20 PM

The warnning Ubrales is receiving is the 1.1 versas 2.0. If you plug a USB device that can use USB 2.0 in to a hub/port set to 1.1 you will get this message.

For most USB devices the Port will provide enough power for say mouse/usb thumb drives. For HDDs and multiple items on one port I use the Power pack. The port can provide upto 1/2 amp (2.5 Watts), the power pack (Most) provides 2.5A for upto 12.5 Watts - Many HDDs are up to 10 Watts.

Usually "slow" downs are due to bandwidth issues, not power.

Added, If you have USB2, make sure your Hub is designed for USB2, not USB 1.1 (If that is the case you normally will get that "warning"
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August 6, 2010 2:14:46 AM

Even if the USB port has the capability to power small devices, I don't like the idea of doing so. I prefer to use an external power source for things like USB hubs, external drives, etc.

The reason for this is the fact when power is tapped from the USB hub, this results in increased power (amps) going thru the motherboard, and this results in additional heat inside the computer. Whereas, if an external power source (small transformer) is used, then the amps and heat produced is external to the computer.
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August 7, 2010 7:53:55 PM

The only concern should be not maxing out the usb port (0.5 A). If you maxed out 3 usb ports, that would only be 7.5 W, somewheres around 5% ( 1 maxed out/2.5W/<2%) of a system at idle and unless 0.1 Degree is cause for concern, I would not wory about it. For anything that approaches 0.5 Amps, I also use a brick (ie HDD), Also this is not from the +12, or +5 Rails as the USB has it's own rail.
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August 8, 2010 12:53:50 PM

RetiredChief said:
The only concern should be not maxing out the usb port (0.5 A). If you maxed out 3 usb ports, that would only be 7.5 W, somewheres around 5% ( 1 maxed out/2.5W/<2%) of a system at idle and unless 0.1 Degree is cause for concern, I would not wory about it. For anything that approaches 0.5 Amps, I also use a brick (ie HDD), Also this is not from the +12, or +5 Rails as the USB has it's own rail.


I agree with you. You are correct in your statements.

However, I consider incremental quantities of everything, and that's why given an option, I will choose to power even tiny devices through external means rather than the USB ports on the motherboard. This is my personal policy, not subject to deviation!
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August 12, 2010 1:42:19 PM

Best answer selected by ionosphere.
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