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SATA II and SATA III read/access file speeds

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July 22, 2012 10:47:02 PM

To start, I have my Samsung 830 SSD installed on my machine; latest firmware and unallocated space for reduced performance downgrade and all.

I can only run my 830 through SATA II speeds because that's all my motherboard can handle; they don't have any firmware updates nor SATA III ports for my SSD data cable to plug into on the board (Here's a link to the board: H-RS880-uATX (Aloe)).

There's a few questions I had after I installed the SSD.

1) My 830 SSD caps out at 250 MBp/s in read speed (I don't care too much about write speeds). This was tested with benchmark software but my question is next here.

If my 830 SSD can read 250 MBp/s in files/data, how is it that Windows 7 doesn't start almost immediately? Is there really 250 MB worth of data during the start-up that the SSD needs to read/bring to RAM? How come it doesn't feel like it's going as fast as it can? Is my RAM - being PC3-10600 - being the bottleneck for the drive?

2) Could I possible use a PCI Express x1 card that has SATA III capability and achieve the 6Gbp/s speeds on the my 830 SSD? Or would I need to consider a PCI Express card having more lanes to actually reach those speeds, if I went the expansion card way?

3) If I ever were to connect my SSD to a 6Gbp/s port, would Windows 7 start-up the same speed, because my other hardware is slowing it down? Or would I see a huge increase in boot times going from II to III with the same RAM?

Would Windows files really be read at 430 MBp/s with SATA III?

I forget one other important detail: my processor is AMD Phenom II quad core, at 3.2 GHz. I don't know if that's a bottleneck, either.
a b G Storage
July 23, 2012 12:16:14 AM

250Mb/s is about right for your SSD, you would only get the faster speeds if the data that was being read was in the SSD cache and/or compressed, faster SATA bus speed would not make much difference.
Your Windows startup time is also influenced by the speed of the processor not only the read speed of the SSD and waiting for hardware to be initialized. I was disappointed when I got my SSD, it only halved the boot up time and reduced application load time to 25%. :( 
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a c 525 G Storage
July 23, 2012 1:09:11 AM

dissemble2discover said:
1) My 830 SSD caps out at 250 MBp/s in read speed (I don't care too much about write speeds). This was tested with benchmark software but my question is next here.

If my 830 SSD can read 250 MBp/s in files/data, how is it that Windows 7 doesn't start almost immediately? Is there really 250 MB worth of data during the start-up that the SSD needs to read/bring to RAM? How come it doesn't feel like it's going as fast as it can? Is my RAM - being PC3-10600 - being the bottleneck for the drive?


Your 256MB/s benchmark results are for large file sequential read speeds. Average users read and write large files less than 1% of the time.

Windows start-up files are in the 4k to 8k range. Look at your benchmark and see what 4k results you are getting.

Read this link for a detailed explanation of what I’m talking about:
http://thessdreview.com/ssd-guides/beginners-guide/the-...


2) Could I possible use a PCI Express x1 card that has SATA III capability and achieve the 6Gbp/s speeds on the my 830 SSD? Or would I need to consider a PCI Express card having more lanes to actually reach those speeds, if I went the expansion card way? said:
2) Could I possible use a PCI Express x1 card that has SATA III capability and achieve the 6Gbp/s speeds on the my 830 SSD? Or would I need to consider a PCI Express card having more lanes to actually reach those speeds, if I went the expansion card way?


No, you can’t get maximum advertised speeds of a current generation SSD from a x1 card. You need a card with 4 lanes or more; and you need a motherboard with a x4 or x8 slot to connect the card to.


3) If I ever were to connect my SSD to a 6Gbp/s port, would Windows 7 start-up the same speed, because my other hardware is slowing it down? Or would I see a huge increase in boot times going from II to III with the same RAM? said:
3) If I ever were to connect my SSD to a 6Gbp/s port, would Windows 7 start-up the same speed, because my other hardware is slowing it down? Or would I see a huge increase in boot times going from II to III with the same RAM?


You need a motherboard with native 6Gb/s ports to get maximum performance from your SSD. Current generation motherboards have chipsets and BIOSs that are designed to get the most out of SATA 3 drives.
The best chipsets are X79, Z77, Z68, & P67.


Would Windows files really be read at 430 MBp/s with SATA III? said:
Would Windows files really be read at 430 MBp/s with SATA III?


Most Windows files are probably to small to be read at 430MB/s. If you were copying and pasting a large video file from one directory to another on the same drive you would probably get close to those speeds.


I forget one other important detail: my processor is AMD Phenom II quad core, at 3.2 GHz. I don't know if that's a bottleneck, either. said:
I forget one other important detail: my processor is AMD Phenom II quad core, at 3.2 GHz. I don't know if that's a bottleneck, either.


No, your cpu is not a bottleneck.

With your next SSD purchase look at Access Times (Latency).
The lower the access time the faster Windows 7 will boot.
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