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[Help] Need Advice on Digital Camera for Hiker

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Anonymous
December 13, 2004 10:05:21 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

My father is a hiker who lives in Washington State. He's looking
for his first digital camera; currently considering a Kodak Easy
Share DX7590 because of the 10x optical zoom and relatively low
price. He's concerned, however, about moisture issues; if he packs
the camera in plastic bag(s), would there still be a problem with
condensation forming as the camera warms and/or cools (depending
on his elevation)? And if so, could it be severe enough to affect
the photos or the camera itself? No point in paying $500+ for a
camera system just to have it get ruined his first time out. Any
info/recommendations would be greatly appreciated, TIA...


--
J.J. in WA ~ mom, vid gamer, novice cook ~
"I rule you!" - Travis of the Cosmos, ATHF
December 13, 2004 10:05:22 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Check out the Olympus Stylus Verve, 400, and 410. They're billed as
"all-weather"; I've heard they can be used in a rainstorm, although I
wouldn't actually submerse them.

Good Luck!
ECM
Anonymous
December 13, 2004 10:05:22 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

I'm no expert on anything with the moisture, but, I have a camera with a
10x optical zoom, and I find that the 10x zoom is more than I can handle.
Without a tripod anything zoomed in at that distance usually gets a bit
blurry. For that reason I usually don't use the full zoom.
consider getting a small hikers tripod too.

my guesses on the moisture..
moisture will not ruin the photo's, a friend of mine put his memory card
thru the washing machine, and it still works just fine.
I have used my camera on damp days and in the rain and have had no problems.
I keep it in a regular camera case and I have not had any trouble.






"Gal Called J.J." <jjsworldSPAM@BLOCKERzipcon.com> wrote in message
news:cpkp5k$e0k8_002@news.zipcon.net...
> My father is a hiker who lives in Washington State. He's looking
> for his first digital camera; currently considering a Kodak Easy
> Share DX7590 because of the 10x optical zoom and relatively low
> price. He's concerned, however, about moisture issues; if he packs
> the camera in plastic bag(s), would there still be a problem with
> condensation forming as the camera warms and/or cools (depending
> on his elevation)? And if so, could it be severe enough to affect
> the photos or the camera itself? No point in paying $500+ for a
> camera system just to have it get ruined his first time out. Any
> info/recommendations would be greatly appreciated, TIA...
>
>
> --
> J.J. in WA ~ mom, vid gamer, novice cook ~
> "I rule you!" - Travis of the Cosmos, ATHF
Related resources
December 14, 2004 12:27:32 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

jjsworldSPAM@BLOCKERzipcon.com (Gal Called J.J.) wrote in news:cpkp5k
$e0k8_002@news.zipcon.net:

> if he packs
> the camera in plastic bag(s), would there still be a problem with
> condensation forming as the camera warms and/or cools

Assuming he's moving from the warm, moist environment to the cooler
place, putting the camera in a plastic bag at home will trap the moisture
inside the bag.

Better to allow the camera to aclimate than to trap it with it's
moisture, I would think.

Living in the southeast, we frequently have the other situation: moving
from cool & dry to hot & humid. Humidity will condense on the lens, but
it doesn't seem to harm the camera -- after it warms up the fog clears
and all is well.

Bob
Anonymous
December 14, 2004 12:27:33 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

bob wrote:
> jjsworldSPAM@BLOCKERzipcon.com (Gal Called J.J.) wrote in news:cpkp5k
> $e0k8_002@news.zipcon.net:
>
>> if he packs
>> the camera in plastic bag(s), would there still be a problem with
>> condensation forming as the camera warms and/or cools
>
> Assuming he's moving from the warm, moist environment to the cooler
> place, putting the camera in a plastic bag at home will trap the
> moisture inside the bag.
>
> Better to allow the camera to aclimate than to trap it with it's
> moisture, I would think.
>
> Living in the southeast, we frequently have the other situation:
> moving from cool & dry to hot & humid. Humidity will condense on the
> lens, but it doesn't seem to harm the camera -- after it warms up the
> fog clears and all is well.
>
> Bob

Condensation problems only become evident when subjecting the camera to
extreme temperature swings such as coming into a warm dwelling from an
outside winter enviroment. The changes found outside (hiking up and down
mountains) do not meet this condition. The camera only needs protection when
going from a very cold enviorment to a warm one - water *will* condense on
and in the cold camera. Sealing in a plastic bag while the camera comes up
to temp will do the trick.
No problem going from warm to cold.
Hope this helps.
Ken.
--
http://www.rupert.net/~solar
Return address supplied by 'spammotel'
http://www.spammotel.com
Anonymous
December 14, 2004 2:44:43 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

"JimmySchmittsLovesChocolateMilk" <nothing@doing.ca> writes:

> I'm no expert on anything with the moisture, but, I have a camera with a
> 10x optical zoom, and I find that the 10x zoom is more than I can handle.
> Without a tripod anything zoomed in at that distance usually gets a bit
> blurry. For that reason I usually don't use the full zoom.
> consider getting a small hikers tripod too.

Image stabalization as found on Panasonic FZ cameras, Konica Minolta
A1/A2/A200/Z3, the Canon S1, and Nikon 8800 can often times help reduce camera
shake that show up with long zoom lenses. Note, Image Stabalization does not
help reduce subject movement.

--
Michael Meissner
email: mrmnews@the-meissners.org
http://www.the-meissners.org
Anonymous
December 15, 2004 1:07:59 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Just a short post to thank everyone who responded; I'll forward
your comments/suggestions to my Dad... :-)

One time on Usenet, jjsworldSPAM@BLOCKERzipcon.com (Gal Called J.J.)
said:

> My father is a hiker who lives in Washington State. He's looking
> for his first digital camera; currently considering a Kodak Easy
> Share DX7590 because of the 10x optical zoom and relatively low
> price. He's concerned, however, about moisture issues; if he packs
> the camera in plastic bag(s), would there still be a problem with
> condensation forming as the camera warms and/or cools (depending
> on his elevation)? And if so, could it be severe enough to affect
> the photos or the camera itself? No point in paying $500+ for a
> camera system just to have it get ruined his first time out. Any
> info/recommendations would be greatly appreciated, TIA...
>
>


--
J.J. in WA ~ mom, vid gamer, novice cook ~
"I rule you!" - Travis of the Cosmos, ATHF
!