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SSD and Mechanical Drive question

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  • Flash Media
  • SSD
  • Storage
Last response: in Storage
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July 28, 2012 5:08:43 AM

Hey, I plan on getting a solid state drive as well as a 1TB mechanical drive for my new build. I want to use the SSD as a boot drive as well as a drive for programs (Updates, Microsoft office programs, Sony Vegas, Steam, Itunes, you get the picture...) and the mechanical drive for songs, pictures, games, videos that I edit and such.

My question is, would I be able to fit my OS (Win7 Home 64-bit) AND programs into one 256GB SSD without worrying about reaching a min of 15% free space? Keep in mind that I don't plan on downloading a million programs, I like to keep things simple.
If not, should I just get a 128GB SSD and use it ONLY for my OS, and then keep my programs/songs, videos, etc in my mechanical drive?

It just seems silly to me when people say get a 80GB-or-more SSD for a boot drive and then get a HHD. Why let all the extra space go to waste?

I'm a storage noob so thanks for your input.

More about : ssd mechanical drive question

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a c 545 G Storage
July 28, 2012 5:48:56 AM

A 256GB drive formatted is around 238.08. A Windows 7 install with all Service Packs and updates is around 20GB. So after installing Windows you will have around 218GB of free space to install all of the rest of your programs and games.

Go to each software’s website and see what the system requirements are. There you will see how much space each program needs to install on your system.
Add it all up and subtract the total from 218 and you will see how much free space you will have left.

Look at the size of your data files to determine where you want to store them.
For example, I have 2,500 picture files, which is quite a lot, but they total only 1.5GB in size, so I chose to keep them on my SSD. I have 55 video files and they total 40GB, so I chose to keep them on my 2TB HDD.
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July 28, 2012 6:36:54 AM

I've always wondered: why do people always say you should have at least 80GB or more if you're going to use a SSD purely for an OS? I see people always giving reviews for 64GB SSDs saying that they're perfect for a boot drive. If it's best to have 80GB for a boot drive, why do people say 64GB is perfect for a boot drive?
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July 28, 2012 7:09:01 AM

Most people use their SSD as a boot/application drive. Programs you use alot and would like to open quickly benefit from being on the SSD, e.g. startup programs. You will notice a huge difference in resuming from hibernate or cold boot if all your major applications are on an SSD (just check out some youtube videos of side by side comparisons).

64GB really isn't alot. I have an 80GB HD, and after removing the pagefile and hibernate file I still don't have a ton of space for apps. 80GB cuts it close, 120+GB would be very comfortable. The only thing I've noticed with the SSD + HD solution is that my hard drive is way too big. 1TB is a *** ton of space for the average user. I would be comfortable with anything down to a 240GB HD probably. My next build might just have a single 256GB SSD.
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July 29, 2012 2:10:43 AM

Actually, I was thinking of doing that- just getting one 512GB SSD for everything. And then maybe another 128 or 265GB SSD for extra storage when I need it, maybe for videos that I edit for youtube and such.

I like to keep my computer clean and simple, maybe 10 or 20 really important programs like Sony Vegas, 5 or ten games, and maybe 5-10 thousand songs (I'd probably put these on a 64GB SSD if need be). I'd be hard-pressed to believe that I could fill a 512GB SSD with the things I use. I mean, my computer right now is only using 225GB.


I have heard that it's not good to render videos out onto SSDs, can anybody confirm this statement?
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a c 545 G Storage
July 29, 2012 2:25:34 AM

hellokyle said:
Actually, I was thinking of doing that- just getting one 512GB SSD for everything. And then maybe another 128 or 265GB SSD for extra storage when I need it, maybe for videos that I edit for youtube and such.


Sounds like a good idea.

I have heard that it's not good to render videos out onto SSDs, can anybody confirm this statement? said:
I have heard that it's not good to render videos out onto SSDs, can anybody confirm this statement?


Not true. You don't have to worry about drive longevity with current generation SSDs.
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July 29, 2012 2:27:20 AM

Best answer selected by hellokyle.
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