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I7-2600k - Number Crunching Mobo

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March 3, 2011 5:40:00 AM

Hello,

I'm looking for the BEST number cruncher for the buck!
Just got myself a shiny 2600k, so my question is : which Motherboard (when it comes out, i can wait a week or two) will give me the BEST Number Crunching Ability in a HIGHLY multi-threaded application. (virtual Machines)

I've read reviews, and everyone seems all about Cad-drawing or Gaming. I want nothing of the sort, raw CPU. (Virtual Machines dont give a crap about graphics cards)

The obvious answer is Asus - WONT DO IT. ( I got screwed out of a $2,000 laptop by them.)

Whats the second best? (Or the BEST if it aint Asus)

Very Appreciatively,

-WhiteLance

PS: Consider the build cost 1,000. If the difference between a $200 board and a $100$ Board isnt 5%, then its not worth it. In that case whats the cheapest motherboard that will not die? (Best pricepoint)

Mild Overclock expected. H50 Cooling modified to push/pull venting.
a b V Motherboard
March 3, 2011 5:50:35 AM

Haha I read the name of your thread, and was like "Asus, I'll recommend him an Asus" but then I read your post and was like :/ 

So, not Asus then. Next best would obviously be Gigabyte. GA-P67A-UD7 is probably the best for the job (given you don't want to spend too much cash and want some value for your money as well). This motherboard is \o/\o/\o/

6 USB 3.0 ports on the rear panel, 4 x PCI-E 16x/8x/4x slots, 3-way SLI/XFire support, 4 x SATA and 4 x SATAIII ports, 10 Channel Audio...

Getting the ASUS though, and you will have onboard Bluetooth 2.1 with the deal. Better value for money as well. But hey, you don't want Asus...
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March 3, 2011 4:09:44 PM

And sorry for the double post, I completely agree with you about Asus. I bought a P5N-D Nvidia 750i board off them and had to send it back for RMA 3 times at $35.00 a pop for shipping. I got fed up and that's when I turned to Asrock no issues since.

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a c 222 V Motherboard
March 3, 2011 4:59:22 PM

whitey_rolls said:
And sorry for the double post, I completely agree with you about Asus. I bought a P5N-D Nvidia 750i board off them and had to send it back for RMA 3 times at $35.00 a pop for shipping. I got fed up and that's when I turned to Asrock no issues since.

ASRock Inc., was established in 2002 by ASUS, to create motherboards targeted at the entry-level to mainstream segment of the motherboard business.

So you're still dealing with ASUS.
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a b V Motherboard
March 4, 2011 8:48:02 AM

ko888 said:
ASRock Inc., was established in 2002 by ASUS, to create motherboards targeted at the entry-level to mainstream segment of the motherboard business.

So you're still dealing with ASUS.


+1. ASRock is the cheaper little brother of ASUS. I used ASRock for a long time before I switched to ASUS. No difference TBH.

I'd get ASUS just for the extra peace of mind that the little extra attention that went into the motherboard makes it deserving of the ASUS logo instead of the ASRock one. But if I'm in need of cash, ASRock it will be.
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April 22, 2011 6:46:07 PM


Far as actual number crunching goes its the CPU that does it not the mobo, so that doesn't matter.

My Suggestion is stop looking at mainstream boards all together if this is for primary doing VM work.

Get a workstation class / server class mobo, and save yourself headaches later. Those are designed to crunch numbers 24/7 in such setups.

Look for WS or CSM type of boards, i know you dont like asus, but look at thier 2600k WS board they have and then find other brands if you dont like them, that have similar boards.

The WS ( workstation ) boards are what u need for solid VM work, not a main stream overclock gaming boards as everyone else has suggested here.

Look at workstaion or CSM business branded boards, those are designed to run heavy duty 24/7 stuff better, especially VM work / server work.
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June 10, 2011 12:48:38 AM

as computer retailer we see more of the asus based machines back, although most issues are minor wouldn't you go for something that doesn't have the issues.
also do you really need bluetooth????

If you do some reading a majority of people seem to be going to Gigabyte! well this month anyway!!
doing a build myself with the 2600k and a after looking at all boards the Gigabyte GA-P67A-UD4-b3 seems to be great bang for buck!
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June 11, 2011 4:42:16 AM

the z68 ud4 is good price around $169-$190 with 16 power phase, the ud7 has like 24 which is way better for OC but for the pirce a bit high =P around $320-$350. the ud5($230-$250) has 20 which is more then ASus P8p67 deluxe($200). Yes like every1 said, if you dont like Asus, next best motherboards are Gigabyte
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a b V Motherboard
June 11, 2011 6:27:50 AM

If you want to do some heavy duty number crunching, perhaps you should consider writing the code to run using the CUDA interface, and use the power of your GPU instead of your CPU?

Gives you a great excuse to buy a powerful video card :) 

Or perhaps your work should be using SSE (or one of its successors)?

I know you already have the CPU, but if you really need as many hardware threads as possible, perhaps you should have the Core i7 990X instead? 6 hardware cores, all hyperthreaded, is faster than 4 hardware cores (hyperthreaded) in benchmarks that can use all available cores (according to Tom's benchmarking).

Just thought you might want to consider some different options...
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September 18, 2011 3:18:43 PM

kooltime said:
Far as actual number crunching goes its the CPU that does it not the mobo, so that doesn't matter.

My Suggestion is stop looking at mainstream boards all together if this is for primary doing VM work.

Get a workstation class / server class mobo, and save yourself headaches later. Those are designed to crunch numbers 24/7 in such setups.

Look for WS or CSM type of boards, i know you dont like asus, but look at thier 2600k WS board they have and then find other brands if you dont like them, that have similar boards.

The WS ( workstation ) boards are what u need for solid VM work, not a main stream overclock gaming boards as everyone else has suggested here.

Look at workstaion or CSM business branded boards, those are designed to run heavy duty 24/7 stuff better, especially VM work / server work.


plus 1. I'm running a server cpu on my gaming setup. I run boinc (volunteer computing) 24/7 in the background, the server CPU (came about a month after the CPU did) crunches way more (about 33-40%) than the desktop 2core.
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