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Setting up RAID 0 without windows.

Last response: in Storage
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July 29, 2012 5:18:55 PM

Hello all,
I would like to know how i can set up RAID 0 for a windows 7 install. I know I need identical drives, I will be using 4 WD 2TB black drives. that ought to be plenty of storage for my current and future games.
system specs, just in case:
Asus P8Z68-M PRO (BIOS version 3806)
Intel 2500K
Radeon HD6850 (looking to upgrade this soon too)
8GB Kingston Hyper X 1600Mhz
HP optical drive
some old Seagate 500GB drive right now.

More about : setting raid windows

a c 114 G Storage
July 29, 2012 5:34:18 PM

Follow the instructions in your MoBo Manual .... but 4 HD's in RAID 0 is scary .... one goes and all data lost. And RAID 0 will not noticably improve your game experience.
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a b G Storage
July 29, 2012 5:35:03 PM

Read the motherboard manual.

Should tell you how to set up the RAID from the BIOS. So by the time you install Windows - you already have the Raid array set up and configured

Cheers
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July 29, 2012 5:59:33 PM

JackNaylorPE said:
Follow the instructions in your MoBo Manual .... but 4 HD's in RAID 0 is scary .... one goes and all data lost. And RAID 0 will not noticably improve your game experience.


is there a safer alternative that is also faster than just a single drive? remember i am also using this as a boot drive/array. if it won't increase game performance i would enjoy faster load times between levels.
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July 29, 2012 6:14:48 PM

yoji said:
Read the motherboard manual.

Should tell you how to set up the RAID from the BIOS. So by the time you install Windows - you already have the Raid array set up and configured

Cheers


i guess i will have to dig around for that manual. bought this board a while ago and moved twice since. unless it's on the asus website...maybe i will look there first.
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Best solution

a b G Storage
July 29, 2012 9:12:25 PM

The manual is linked off this page, http://www.asus.com/Motherboards/Intel_Socket_1155/P8Z6...

As several have mentioned I would not put 4 drives in a raid 0 set. Depending on how your system runs Raid 1, you may get get faster reads without adding to the possibility of losing all data. If load times are all you are looking for improving that seems like it may fit. You probably want to run some test though, as some systems do not read from both drives in a Raid 1 set.
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July 30, 2012 12:33:27 AM

tomatthe said:
The manual is linked off this page, http://www.asus.com/Motherboards/Intel_Socket_1155/P8Z6...

As several have mentioned I would not put 4 drives in a raid 0 set. Depending on how your system runs Raid 1, you may get get faster reads without adding to the possibility of losing all data. If load times are all you are looking for improving that seems like it may fit. You probably want to run some test though, as some systems do not read from both drives in a Raid 1 set.


i've been meaning to research raid for a couple years. i know raid 0 is max performance but safety hasn't occurred to me yet.
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July 30, 2012 12:33:43 AM

Best answer selected by regularguy290.
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July 30, 2012 1:04:27 AM

If you are looking for something that is redundant, and has the bonus of a speed increase you should be looking at RAID 5, raid 5 spans your data across all the disks so the more spindals you have (disks), the more performance you will get. It also writes a parity bit across all the drives, so if you loose a disk, you data is not lost, and can be rebuilt from the existing drives. You will loose one disk's worth of capacity but is well worth knowing that one disk failure will wipe out all your data. For raid5, you will want a real raid controller to handle all the processing, I would stay away from "Soft-raid" and go with something from either 3ware, adaptec, areca, or LSI.

For <= 4 disks, you will only need a single channel controller:

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

With most of these cards you will need a cable to go with them, this should work fine for sata disks
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Keep in mind that this is expensive because it's enterprise class storage here, but you get the enterprise class features as well. If your data is worth it to you, you shouldn't go anything less. I personally run the areca raid controller in my server at home with 4X 1 TB hd's in raid 5, so i have 3 TB usable. Also, with a real raid card, you can run ANY os you want, linux will support all these controllers!

Also, remember, that RAID is not substitute for backing up your data. It only covers you in the case of hardware failure, a virus, or deleting the files, raid will not protect you from that.

--Joe
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July 30, 2012 11:35:54 AM

goldfish said:
If you are looking for something that is redundant, and has the bonus of a speed increase you should be looking at RAID 5, raid 5 spans your data across all the disks so the more spindals you have (disks), the more performance you will get. It also writes a parity bit across all the drives, so if you loose a disk, you data is not lost, and can be rebuilt from the existing drives. You will loose one disk's worth of capacity but is well worth knowing that one disk failure will wipe out all your data. For raid5, you will want a real raid controller to handle all the processing, I would stay away from "Soft-raid" and go with something from either 3ware, adaptec, areca, or LSI.

For <= 4 disks, you will only need a single channel controller:

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

With most of these cards you will need a cable to go with them, this should work fine for sata disks
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Keep in mind that this is expensive because it's enterprise class storage here, but you get the enterprise class features as well. If your data is worth it to you, you shouldn't go anything less. I personally run the areca raid controller in my server at home with 4X 1 TB hd's in raid 5, so i have 3 TB usable. Also, with a real raid card, you can run ANY os you want, linux will support all these controllers!

Also, remember, that RAID is not substitute for backing up your data. It only covers you in the case of hardware failure, a virus, or deleting the files, raid will not protect you from that.

--Joe


thanks a lot, Joe. i finally get a real answer a half hour after i think this thread is dead and already chose a best answer. i best start saving my dimes if i am going to get the project started.
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