Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question
Solved

New Build Storage?

Last response: in Storage
Share
August 2, 2012 2:50:27 AM

I am building a new Workstation for video editing Spending some long Green and have been informed that I should always place my files/video in a separate drive to 'free up my boot drive, plus the files are big so I could fill up my boot drive pretty quick. I have been finding different types of drives...

External such as:
Videoguys suggestion:

G-Tech G-RAID for External RAID 0
G-Tech G-SPEED Q for Ext. RAID 5
Stardom SOHORAID DIY Ext. RAID 5

Me looking around:

Western Digital My Book Essential 2 TB USB 3.0/2.0 Desktop External Hard Drive WDBACW0020HBK-NESN

Internal such as:

Seagate Barracuda XT ST32000641AS 2TB 7200 RPM 64MB Cache SATA 6.0Gb/s 3.5" Internal Hard Drive -Bare Drive

Western Digital Caviar Black 1 TB SATA III 7200 RPM 64 MB Cache Internal Desktop Hard Drive Bulk/OEM - WD1002FAEX

OR the $$ of $

WD VelociRaptor WD1000DHTZ - hard drive - 1 TB - SATA-600 (WD1000DHTZ) -10,000RPM

Here is the question how do these bottle neck or slow work flow?

I am bolting it up to a DIY 9 hot rod

MOBO Asus P9X79 WS
RAM G.SKILL Ripjaws Z Series 32GB (8 4GB) 1866
boot Drive 512gb m4 crucial 2.5 inch Solid state
Processor Intel Core i7 3930K

I don't want the file/video access to bottle neck me. Which has better transfer speed and do I need to bleed $$ for that 10k rpm storage or will 7200 get me there unnoticeable? Will the 3.0 be fine etc... I am new to this build and tech.

Thanks in advance for any help on this

Netcommercial

More about : build storage

a c 125 G Storage
August 2, 2012 3:41:43 AM

i would use the 7200 rpm drives..the 10k are only slightly faster. I would also save yourself some cash by using the onboard sata ports for raid. put the ssd and cd-rom on the two 6g ports and then put two-4 drives in raid on the sata 3g ports. I would use a hot swap box and put the data drives in the hot swap box. I would use a usb ext to back up your data or use online cloud storage. if the data raid dies you want to have your videos back up somewhere safe.
m
0
l
August 2, 2012 5:09:33 AM

smorizio said:
i would use the 7200 rpm drives..the 10k are only slightly faster. I would also save yourself some cash by using the onboard sata ports for raid. put the ssd and cd-rom on the two 6g ports and then put two-4 drives in raid on the sata 3g ports. I would use a hot swap box and put the data drives in the hot swap box. I would use a usb ext to back up your data or use online cloud storage. if the data raid dies you want to have your videos back up somewhere safe.



Thanks for the detailed reply. I will sleuth through it, and cipher what all that entails
Cheers
m
0
l
Related resources

Best solution

a b G Storage
August 2, 2012 5:29:10 AM

here setup i use for video editing work

1- 64GB SSD (for OS only)
1- 128GB SSD (for videos while editing)
2- 2TB Hard drives 5400rpm storage
2- 2TB Hard drives same used to back up first 2.

my process: i would copy video files from storage drives to SSD work on project, then save and erase files off SSD afterwards.
I use four drive bay for my storage (can turn on/off individual drives)

Overall i have 4TB space of storage that i back up, 128GB SSD is helping a lot while editing.
types of storage drives don't matter in this case they can copy video files at ~100MB/sec because videos are large continuous files, so even 100GB project copies over really quick.
Share
August 12, 2012 8:58:37 PM

duxducis said:
here setup i use for video editing work

1- 64GB SSD (for OS only)
1- 128GB SSD (for videos while editing)
2- 2TB Hard drives 5400rpm storage
2- 2TB Hard drives same used to back up first 2.

my process: i would copy video files from storage drives to SSD work on project, then save and erase files off SSD afterwards.
I use four drive bay for my storage (can turn on/off individual drives)

Overall i have 4TB space of storage that i back up, 128GB SSD is helping a lot while editing.
types of storage drives don't matter in this case they can copy video files at ~100MB/sec because videos are large continuous files, so even 100GB project copies over really quick.


Thanks for the layout Duxducis...I was under the impression from another forum, Avid btw.. That I should keep my video files/assets on another drive then my OS or C drive. The C drive I was considering was a 512GB SS--Then a 7200rpm 1tb storage. Which I think I have come to the understanding that using a RAID storage hooked to my SATA port will give me ample speed. (Please correct if I am mistaken)

I think having a back up of my drive is a good idea and was thinking about an external (if I can find a 3.0 usb) I could plug that in TO THE 3.0 PORT and dump weekly into that...

So if I understand you correctly when you import an asset, be it a .mov etc or ?? into your software that is actually importing on your C drive and then you delete when complete? Can't I just tell my Avid studio software to park any file, or imported file, to my 7200 rpm raid storage as well as any asset I create in a folder I make on my RAID storage or "D" drive, without having to tie up my C drive at all?
*Other then when it is rendering in the software?
m
0
l
a b G Storage
August 13, 2012 6:01:33 PM

On my C drive (seperate 64GB SSD) all I have is OS and Editing software.

I import video files to my 2TB storage drive (I work with M2T files 10+-GB each)
At this point i turn on my back up 2TB drive and it synchronize videos (USB 3, or eSATA), happy with back up i turn off that drive.

Once ready for editing I copy video files from storage drive to separate fast SSD drive my is 128GB since i don't need bigger yet. It takes few minutes.

So video editing software reads from very fast SSD and it beats any regular hard drive RAID.
It would render videos to storage drive, i will back it up once project over,
just erase that fast SSD drive, and ready for another project.

I have all separate drives
C: 64GB SSD drive (only OS and Edit software)
D: 128GB SSD drive (very fast reads for quicker editing)(i copy here then erase when done)
F: 2TB storage drive (keep unedited and final projects here)
G: 2TB back up drive (can be anything USB 3 or SATA,)(used only to back up drive F:

(i since added another two 2TB drives, one store other back ups)
m
0
l
August 20, 2012 5:53:47 PM

duxducis said:
On my C drive (seperate 64GB SSD) all I have is OS and Editing software.

I import video files to my 2TB storage drive (I work with M2T files 10+-GB each)
At this point i turn on my back up 2TB drive and it synchronize videos (USB 3, or eSATA), happy with back up i turn off that drive.

Once ready for editing I copy video files from storage drive to separate fast SSD drive my is 128GB since i don't need bigger yet. It takes few minutes.

So video editing software reads from very fast SSD and it beats any regular hard drive RAID.
It would render videos to storage drive, i will back it up once project over,
just erase that fast SSD drive, and ready for another project.

I have all separate drives
C: 64GB SSD drive (only OS and Edit software)
D: 128GB SSD drive (very fast reads for quicker editing)(i copy here then erase when done)
F: 2TB storage drive (keep unedited and final projects here)
G: 2TB back up drive (can be anything USB 3 or SATA,)(used only to back up drive F:

(i since added another two 2TB drives, one store other back ups)


(quote)At this point i turn on my back up 2TB drive and it synchronize videos (USB 3, or eSATA), happy with back up i turn off that drive. (quote) ----Did you mean copied files to?

I am a bit unclear on how my computer and software interact. I was informed on AVID forum by another person, that is will make my render time and work flow quicken if I keep my files on another drive.
On that premise, by keeping my editing software amongst other programs on my C drive. Importing those files onto a second ss drive will actually keep those files on that second drive and what I am rendering will only be on my C drive as a temp file? Path like this: Mycomputer/editing software/2nd drive/video files stored/project

You also stated that a 5400 rpm drive would be fine for video storage due the high transfer rate of a continuous file... That kinda confuses me. Why use a SS drive for importing video to your c drive/software editor if a 5400rpm can get you there quickly? Is this because when the editing software retrieves the file from a storage drive that is where the SS drive shines. In other words, drive to drive storage transfer is pretty quick but when importing into actual software that is where the SS over an RPM drive out performs?


Thanks for your help, I really appreciate the patient details. Please elaborate if you would.
m
0
l
a b G Storage
August 23, 2012 10:39:53 PM

"synchronize videos" yes i meant copied, i just use small program that does it automatically and checks that all files copied over good.

You can edit the default paths that program uses for temp, render, projects in settings.
(i can and always do but i use Adobe editing software, im pretty sure avid got those settings as well)

it better to render/encode into different drive, thou this part is so slow that any drive can keep up with reading and writing during rendering/encoding, the speed is based on CPU/GPU you use, during this process hard drive plays no role on the speed.

Copying is continuous and thus fast, Editing becomes noncontinuous,
once you cut and move clips in editor regular hard drive becomes very slow because it has to read from different locations (seek time slow)
that's where SSD instant seek time makes whole process faster, also much faster reading speed help as well.
SSD helps a lot during this editing stage
m
0
l
August 26, 2012 12:16:01 AM

duxducis said:
"synchronize videos" yes i meant copied, i just use small program that does it automatically and checks that all files copied over good.

You can edit the default paths that program uses for temp, render, projects in settings.
(i can and always do but i use Adobe editing software, im pretty sure avid got those settings as well)

it better to render/encode into different drive, thou this part is so slow that any drive can keep up with reading and writing during rendering/encoding, the speed is based on CPU/GPU you use, during this process hard drive plays no role on the speed.

Copying is continuous and thus fast, Editing becomes noncontinuous,
once you cut and move clips in editor regular hard drive becomes very slow because it has to read from different locations (seek time slow)
that's where SSD instant seek time makes whole process faster, also much faster reading speed help as well.
SSD helps a lot during this editing stage


Thanks Duxducis appreciate your time and insight, very kind of you.
Definitely going with two SSD's then use a Sata or Raid Storage and the same for back ups... Very cool.

I think a SSD128GB C drive for programs
SSD 128GB for for storage I will erase when file is complete
1-2Tb for storage and 1Tb for back up of important stuff./
m
0
l
August 26, 2012 12:18:24 AM

Best answer selected by netcommercial.
m
0
l
!