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1333 or 1600 for MSI P67A-GD65?

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March 8, 2011 2:15:08 PM

Hi guys!

I saw it stated somewhere that GD65 supports DDR3 1333 (PC3-10600), but not anything higher, like DDR 3 1600 (PC3-12800).

On the contrary, I saw it stated elsewhere that it was just a matter of a bios click, and then the board runs just fine with DDR3 1600.

So, my question is: If the board is compatible with DDR3 1600, will I even get any kind of performance gain in view of the fact that the board only supports DDR3 1333?

What I'm trying to say is something like: Will the memory run with the speed of DDR3 1333, even if I install DDR3 1600? Does the board have a limit?
a c 435 V Motherboard
March 8, 2011 3:23:16 PM

I used ram multipliers on my msi board, set at the max of 5, with cpu fsb at 160. This was an 1156 board with i3 cpu. Your board should have similar options. These settings forced the ram to run stable at 1600; some 1333 would also run at the higher speeds. Msi boards are pretty good about ram options. Download the board manual before ordering and check out the bios ram page. My particular board had no voltage options, but it wasn't necessary to increase the ram voltage for 1600 speed. I always use ram rated at 1.5v.
a c 107 V Motherboard
March 8, 2011 3:33:51 PM

The Sandy Bridge CPU will default any higher-speed RAM to 1333 speed. It's technically overclocking to use any speed higher than that, but it's easy to do. In the BIOS/UEFI there will be an option for RAM speed/multiplier. Choose the one for 1600 and then save and exit. It's that simple. The board will also do 1866 and 2133.

Sandy Bridge's sweet spot is DDR3-1600 CL9. Don't bother getting RAM with lower timings as it won't make a noticeable difference. And make sure it's 1.5v spec RAM for maximum compatibility.
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March 8, 2011 5:30:56 PM

Thanks for your replies!

So, can I conclude that if I install DDR3-1600 and do what you say, then it will run as fast as if I installed on a motherboard supporting PC3-12800?

Hmm, I just ordered some Corsair XMS3 1600 CL9, Intel XMP with 1.65v ... is it potentially a big issue?
a c 107 V Motherboard
March 8, 2011 5:41:29 PM

Yes it will be just as fast because the mainboard does support that speed. It's the CPU that doesn't officially support it. The mainboard simply forces the CPU to accept it.

I would cancel if you can and get some 1.5v spec RAM. The 1.65v spec RAM is at the upper limit for Sandy Bridge -- going over that would damage the CPU.
a b V Motherboard
March 8, 2011 6:37:32 PM

Leaps-from-Shadows said:
Yes it will be just as fast because the mainboard does support that speed. It's the CPU that doesn't officially support it. The mainboard simply forces the CPU to accept it.

I would cancel if you can and get some 1.5v spec RAM. The 1.65v spec RAM is at the upper limit for Sandy Bridge -- going over that would damage the CPU.


Can you show us some proof of that from a reliable source, I mean I've not heard that before and were running 1.65v Corsair on several 2600K machines right now.
a b V Motherboard
March 8, 2011 6:44:48 PM

I'm looking at Dual channel kits for i7 and there are a buttload of 1.65v kits.

http://www.corsair.com/memory/intel-memory-solutions/co...

The only dual channel platform for i7 is s1155, unless your running dual channel in your s1366 triple channel motherboard like a noob.
So why would they make so many i7 dual channel kits in 1.65v if they were bad for the cpu?

Not saying your wrong, but I've never heard that before.
a c 435 V Motherboard
March 8, 2011 7:11:50 PM

There's nothing wrong with 1.65v ram; 1.5v supports a wider range of motherboards; I get it as it costs about the same.
a c 197 V Motherboard
March 8, 2011 7:20:00 PM

Leaps-from-Shadows said:
The Sandy Bridge CPU will default any higher-speed RAM to 1333 speed. It's technically overclocking to use any speed higher than that, but it's easy to do. In the BIOS/UEFI there will be an option for RAM speed/multiplier. Choose the one for 1600 and then save and exit. It's that simple. The board will also do 1866 and 2133.

Sandy Bridge's sweet spot is DDR3-1600 CL9. Don't bother getting RAM with lower timings as it won't make a noticeable difference. And make sure it's 1.5v spec RAM for maximum compatibility.




Actually lower latency RAM helps in video encoding.

http://www.bit-tech.net/hardware/memory/2011/01/11/the-...
a c 107 V Motherboard
March 8, 2011 11:05:24 PM

Geek:
There are dual-channel Core i7 XXX CPUs that run on 1156.

And I didn't say that 1.65v kits were bad for the CPU. I said that going over 1.65v RAM voltage may damage the CPU. If you buy two sticks of 1.65v RAM and then two more later, some boards would require more RAM voltage for having four slots filled. Doing that may damage the CPU and shorten its life. Buying 1.5v RAM would allow you to upgrade to four sticks in the future because it's below the 1.65v limit.

All Intel CPUs since Nehalem have had the 1.65v limitation, and Sandy Bridge continues that. Some of the initial previews and more thorough reviews mentioned it. Sandy Bridge E and even Ivy Bridge are likely to have the limit as well, but it may be lowered when they transition to 22nm process.
a c 107 V Motherboard
March 9, 2011 12:02:01 AM

To get more detailed on this limitation, there are two important voltages that are relevant: VCCIO/VTT (two different names for the same voltage) and DRAM Voltage.

The VCCIO/VTT is the voltage supplied to the memory controller built into the CPU. The DRAM Voltage is the voltage supplied to the memory slots.

The DRAM Voltage must always be within 0.5v of the VCCIO/VTT voltage. If the difference between them is greater than 0.5v, you risk damage to the CPU.

Non-overclockers wouldn't know to raise the VCCIO/VTT (or wouldn't be able to because of limited OEM BIOS), so for simplicity they say to not go above 1.65v for DRAM voltage.
a b V Motherboard
March 9, 2011 4:53:31 PM

Ok. Well with a 3 yr warranty I'm not worried about damage to the cpu so I guess it doesn't even matter.

What about running the 1.65v memory at 1.5v?
a c 435 V Motherboard
March 9, 2011 7:12:17 PM

It's been done, but it's not necessary. You can try it and see how stable it is.
a b V Motherboard
March 10, 2011 3:59:45 PM

o1die said:
It's been done, but it's not necessary. You can try it and see how stable it is.


Well I wish I could but I can't do that on customers machines. They have to run a 24hour burn in before they are picked up.

Could someone else try 1.5v on their 1.65v memory and see if it's stable?
March 15, 2011 6:58:28 PM

Quote:
I have MSI P67A-GD65 with G.Skill DDR3 1600 4GB (2 x 2GB). It automatically shows as 1600 but the voltage and timings should be checked. My voltage for RAM was already at 1.492v which is as close to 1.5v you can get without going over...no problem there. This is what I had to do. Enable Intel XMP and set DRAM timing mode to link. This gave me the correct timings that was specified by G.Skill except for the command rate which I manually changed from 1T to 2T, since there is no 2N selection available. Once I changed the command rate though my CPU temp dropped about 2 to 3 degrees celsius and everything was peachy! Now you are ready rock and overclock!!

http://www.totalpowerpc.com/memory-ram.html


Hello,

This is exactly what I had to do as well with my same board setup with the i5 2500K and G.Skill DDR3 1600 8GB (2 x 4GB). I had to drop the voltage as it was set to 1.6xv but all the timings were correct. I received the same CPU temp drop as well. The only thing I noticed was the MSI Control Center still reports the ram as 1333@667Mhz but CPU-Z reports at 1600@798Mhz. Is this due to the software not recognizing the OC in the BIOS?

Thanks
G-Man
!