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How Will This PC Hold Up For Gaming?

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June 14, 2010 10:06:02 AM

It's one of the base models of the Dell XPS 8100. I'm really not looking for a "hardcore" gaming machine really, but something that will let me play games usually on High/Ultra (or even medium for those REALLY graphic intensive games, I'm not too picky). Normally I'd just play games like Starcraft II, Diablo III (once it's released), MW2, and maybe a few others.

Even though building my PC would be a better choice, it's just not something I wanna do. My normal budget is around $1600-$1700 (monitor included), and this set up costs me $1578 (Canadian). Please let me know what you think.




(the 8GB ram is complete overkill, it was the minimum amount for the model I chose, weird >_>).



Processor Intel® Core™ i7-860 processor(8MB Cache, 2.80GHz)

Operating System Genuine Windows® 7 Home Premium, 64Bit, English

Security Software McAfee SecurityCenter, 15-Months

Office Software Microsoft® Office Starter 2010

Memory 8GB Dual Channel DDR3 SDRAM at 1333MHz - 4 DIMMs

Hard Drive 1TB - 7200RPM, SATA 3.0Gb/s, 16MB Cache

Monitor 24.0" Dell ST2410 Full HD Monitor with VGA cable

Graphics Card nVidia GeForce GTX260 1792MB GDDR3

Optical Drive Blu-ray Disc (BD) Combo (Reads BD and Writes to DVD/CD)

Keyboard Dell Studio Consumer Multimedia Keyboard

Mouse Dell Studio Optical Mouse

Speakers Dell AY511 Attached Speaker w/ 5.1 Surround for Dell Monitors



Will this set up be good for atleast the next few years?

Thanks.

More about : hold gaming

June 14, 2010 11:06:43 AM

Yes, this is a good gaming machine, the graphics card is not top notch and does not support DX 11, but it is quite capable and it should be able to play most games on high settings.
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June 14, 2010 12:34:03 PM

How long do you think those cards will last me? Also, how important is it that they don't support DX 11?
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June 14, 2010 12:42:59 PM

I would atleast seriously consider changing the TIM/heatsink on the processor and examining the case for airflow inprovments. I just recently checked my dell (1½ years old) and the material was really poor quality. It dident even appear to be applyed properly(a bad spread that dident cover the entire surface).

heres the post where I detail this. http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/page-282002_28_50.htm...

I seen about 10c temp changes just changing the goop, and it still runs around 15-20c hotter then comparible home builds on the forums here.

You also have a Nvidia card, which will run really hot. My 9800gx2 ate itself and died over this short amount of time, simply because dell cases have 0 airflow. It WILL damage your GPU over time. Dell has a really bad buisness practice as far as throwing in these beefy videocards without heat generation in mind. And by the time your videocard shows the effects of this, your warranty will be over.

Maybe you will have a different experience. But in all honesty I think you'll end up like me. Regreat.

Adding some good fans, maybe a case transplant. You will be in much better shape for years to come :].
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June 14, 2010 1:56:36 PM

i dont understand people that create an account simply to show off their rigs, i just dont seem to understand. You idiots, of course he knows it's a good machine, who doesn't know that 8gb of ram is completely useless and that a GTX260 is one of the best and most expensive cards on the market, now go somewhere else.
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June 14, 2010 1:59:01 PM

sorry, my bad, i got carried out here, i agree, the 8GB is a bit overkill but at least it will make ur comp last longer, i greatly suggest going for 64bit, if that was not your original intention.

kindest regards.
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June 14, 2010 2:03:44 PM

I can promise you I had no intentions of "showing off" my rig. This will be the first desktop I buy in almost 6 years or so and I'm nervous about it so I just want to make sure I don't make a mistake.
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June 14, 2010 2:07:19 PM

thestud said:
It's one of the base models of the Dell XPS 8100. I'm really not looking for a "hardcore" gaming machine really, but something that will let me play games usually on High/Ultra (or even medium for those REALLY graphic intensive games, I'm not too picky). Normally I'd just play games like Starcraft II, Diablo III (once it's released), MW2, and maybe a few others.

Even though building my PC would be a better choice, it's just not something I wanna do. My normal budget is around $1600-$1700 (monitor included), and this set up costs me $1578 (Canadian). Please let me know what you think.




(the 8GB ram is complete overkill, it was the minimum amount for the model I chose, weird >_>).



Processor Intel® Core™ i7-860 processor(8MB Cache, 2.80GHz)

Operating System Genuine Windows® 7 Home Premium, 64Bit, English

Security Software McAfee SecurityCenter, 15-Months

Office Software Microsoft® Office Starter 2010

Memory 8GB Dual Channel DDR3 SDRAM at 1333MHz - 4 DIMMs

Hard Drive 1TB - 7200RPM, SATA 3.0Gb/s, 16MB Cache

Monitor 24.0" Dell ST2410 Full HD Monitor with VGA cable

Graphics Card nVidia GeForce GTX260 1792MB GDDR3

Optical Drive Blu-ray Disc (BD) Combo (Reads BD and Writes to DVD/CD)

Keyboard Dell Studio Consumer Multimedia Keyboard

Mouse Dell Studio Optical Mouse

Speakers Dell AY511 Attached Speaker w/ 5.1 Surround for Dell Monitors



Will this set up be good for atleast the next few years?

Thanks.


A couple suggestions:

Instead of getting 1 1TB hard drive, i either suggest:

1. 1X 500GB HD + 1x 120GB SSD for windows installation
2. or 2x 500GB Hard Drives in raid 0 formation.
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June 14, 2010 2:12:11 PM

^why is that?
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June 14, 2010 2:23:16 PM

thestud said:
^why is that?


2 reasons:

Reason 1, if your hard drive ever fails, you will only have one, you data is lost forever. Although if you have one windows installation hard drive and one data hard drive, you have less a chance of losing your data, unless of course the data hard drive fails, but you should always have a backup anyways.

Reason 2: Your computer will be much faster, with windows installed on one of the drives, preferably the SSD, you can load up programs much faster and have a better performing computer.

Cheers!

If you have anymore questions feel free to ask away!
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June 14, 2010 2:32:28 PM

rolfmaomachizlin said:
2 reasons:

Reason 1, if your hard drive ever fails, you will only have one, you data is lost forever. Although if you have one windows installation hard drive and one data hard drive, you have less a chance of losing your data, unless of course the data hard drive fails, but you should always have a backup anyways.

Reason 2: Your computer will be much faster, with windows installed on one of the drives, preferably the SSD, you can load up programs much faster and have a better performing computer.

Cheers!

If you have anymore questions feel free to ask away!



Ah that's actually a really good idea, thanks!
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June 14, 2010 2:43:56 PM

thestud said:
Ah that's actually a really good idea, thanks!


yes, i do that from now on on every computer, i have bad memories of data loss, its terrible, when you have 2 -3 years worth of photos, music and videos that just disappear, better safe then sorry.

A suggestion if you are suggesting on buying an SSD and 500GB or two 500GBs.

SSD:

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

500Gb Hard Drive:

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Total for 2 hard drive: $314.98

The SSD is expensive, but it is ridiculously fast, it opens my browser less than a second. Loads photoshop in 7 seconds. if that means anything to you.
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June 14, 2010 2:47:17 PM

please PM me because im going to bed if you have anymore questions/concerns, i want to help!
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June 14, 2010 2:53:57 PM

rolfmaomachizlin said:
please PM me because im going to bed if you have anymore questions/concerns, i want to help!


Will do! Thanks.
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a b B Homebuilt system
a b 4 Gaming
June 14, 2010 3:50:10 PM

rolfmaomachizlin said:
2 reasons:

Reason 1, if your hard drive ever fails, you will only have one, you data is lost forever. Although if you have one windows installation hard drive and one data hard drive, you have less a chance of losing your data, unless of course the data hard drive fails, but you should always have a backup anyways.

Reason 2: Your computer will be much faster, with windows installed on one of the drives, preferably the SSD, you can load up programs much faster and have a better performing computer.


I'm not sure why you're suggesting data security in this message, yet you were suggesting RAID 0 above?

RAID 0, while it will provide increased speed, is pretty much the worst way to go if you have any concerns about losing your data. It actually increases the chance of losing your data over a single hard drive, as you have 2 possible points of failure. Did you mean to recommend RAID 1 instead (full mirroring)?

On the other hand, the SSD + traditional hard drive suggestion is quite reasonable, as long as the SSD doesn't break the bank.
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June 15, 2010 12:15:09 AM

@coldsleep +1. :] lol
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June 15, 2010 4:49:24 PM

yeah, adding a ssd only for the windows and application installations is one of the best things you can do to boost performance.
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June 17, 2010 1:39:59 AM

coldsleep said:
I'm not sure why you're suggesting data security in this message, yet you were suggesting RAID 0 above?

RAID 0, while it will provide increased speed, is pretty much the worst way to go if you have any concerns about losing your data. It actually increases the chance of losing your data over a single hard drive, as you have 2 possible points of failure. Did you mean to recommend RAID 1 instead (full mirroring)?

On the other hand, the SSD + traditional hard drive suggestion is quite reasonable, as long as the SSD doesn't break the bank.


yes sorry i meant RAID 1. Was very tired as i said.
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