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laptop or tablet with VGA or DVI Input? (need small, high ..

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Anonymous
a b D Laptop
October 21, 2004 2:51:05 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

I have done some searching on connecting a laptop monitor to a
desktop, preferably via DVI input. I know most people find the idea
ridiculous, when desktop LCD's are common and relatively inexpensive.
However, I really do need something like this.

My reasons are this:
--I am quite nearsighted. For some reason, I have not been able to
view screens comfortably with contacts or glasses, though I have tried
different strengths. I see best without glasses at a distance of
about 10-12 inches. Therefore, I need a smaller, high DPI display.
Most people use laptop UXGA displays for portability. However, I
actually LIKE reading fine print.
--The only desktop display I have seen that meets or exceeds the best
laptop resolutions would be the $8000 IBM T221, and given the close
distance I operate at, this size is un-usable, plus it requires a
ridiculously special video card to operate.
--I need the desktop processing power and fast access to an array of
hard disks.
--I don't only use a desktop. I still do need a laptop/Tablet PC for
some applications. And in both situations, I actually LIKE having the
same, small-format screen.
--I would still use the laptop/Tablet PC to remotely control the
desktop from other rooms for certain applications.
--I like using an intuitive, pen-based interface. A monitor like the
Wacom Cintiq would give similar capability, but does not meet my
size/resolution requirement, plus is rather expensive.

If a custom-built monitor could meet my small size, high DPI needs,
that would be an acceptable solution. But I imagine that would be
quite expensive compared to an off-the-shelf solution, which presently
does not seem to exist.

Therefore it seems worth the extra money for a portable PC that meets
my needs as a desktop display. Even if there was an added expense to
customize it to accept DVI input, it might be the most productive and
cost-effective solution given my special needs.

I'm a niche customer, so it's very hard to find answers. Hope someone
can point me in the right direction.
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
October 21, 2004 11:01:34 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

"Jonathan Westbay" <JonathanWestbay@gmail.com> wrote in message
news:f809b1c3.0410202151.4144dd47@posting.google.com...
>I have done some searching on connecting a laptop monitor to a
> desktop, preferably via DVI input. I know most people find the idea
> ridiculous, when desktop LCD's are common and relatively inexpensive.
> However, I really do need something like this.
>
> My reasons are this:
> --I am quite nearsighted. For some reason, I have not been able to
> view screens comfortably with contacts or glasses, though I have tried
> different strengths. I see best without glasses at a distance of
> about 10-12 inches. Therefore, I need a smaller, high DPI display.
> Most people use laptop UXGA displays for portability. However, I
> actually LIKE reading fine print.
> --The only desktop display I have seen that meets or exceeds the best
> laptop resolutions would be the $8000 IBM T221, and given the close
> distance I operate at, this size is un-usable, plus it requires a
> ridiculously special video card to operate.
> --I need the desktop processing power and fast access to an array of
> hard disks.
> --I don't only use a desktop. I still do need a laptop/Tablet PC for
> some applications. And in both situations, I actually LIKE having the
> same, small-format screen.
> --I would still use the laptop/Tablet PC to remotely control the
> desktop from other rooms for certain applications.
> --I like using an intuitive, pen-based interface. A monitor like the
> Wacom Cintiq would give similar capability, but does not meet my
> size/resolution requirement, plus is rather expensive.
>
> If a custom-built monitor could meet my small size, high DPI needs,
> that would be an acceptable solution. But I imagine that would be
> quite expensive compared to an off-the-shelf solution, which presently
> does not seem to exist.
>
> Therefore it seems worth the extra money for a portable PC that meets
> my needs as a desktop display. Even if there was an added expense to
> customize it to accept DVI input, it might be the most productive and
> cost-effective solution given my special needs.
>
> I'm a niche customer, so it's very hard to find answers. Hope someone
> can point me in the right direction.

In working with a friend with sudden macular degeneration, I have come
to understand that there have been major advances in specialty optics
for all types of vision problems especially involving computer displays
and television. I suggest that you make contact with your local
services for the blind since they seem to have the widest range of
contacts for solving special vision problems of all kinds and might put
you in touch with exactly the equipment you need.

Q
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
October 21, 2004 1:16:07 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

JonathanWestbay@gmail.com (Jonathan Westbay) wrote:
>I have done some searching on connecting a laptop monitor to a
>desktop, preferably via DVI input.


Check out http://maxivista.com/ for a software solution. Dunno for
sure, but I doubt that laptop panels are DVI-compatable, even if you
could bash something together...
Related resources
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
October 21, 2004 8:43:33 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

Jonathan Westbay <JonathanWestbay@gmail.com> wrote:
> --The only desktop display I have seen that meets or exceeds the best
> laptop resolutions would be the $8000 IBM T221, and given the close
> distance I operate at, this size is un-usable, plus it requires a
> ridiculously special video card to operate.
> --I need the desktop processing power and fast access to an array of
> hard disks.

Fine - so what stops you just running the desktop graphics on your
laptops screen, remotely? Unix has done this as standard for at least
twenty years, and I recall that there are similar "remote desktop" apps
for windows too. Vsomething.


Peter
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
October 22, 2004 7:35:35 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

......
> Fine - so what stops you just running the desktop graphics on your
> laptops screen, remotely? Unix has done this as standard for at least
> twenty years, and I recall that there are similar "remote desktop" apps
> for windows too. Vsomething.
>

Remote desktop comes with XP--it's pretty good.
Citrix and ThinAnywhere are the 2 most common high-end products--they would
work fine with 100 ethernet.
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
October 22, 2004 1:25:30 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

JonathanWestbay@gmail.com (Jonathan Westbay) wrote
> --The only desktop display I have seen that meets or exceeds
> the best laptop resolutions would be the $8000 IBM T221

....$3000 at Tiger Direct, if you don't mind refurbished:
http://www.tigerdirect.com/applications/searchtools/ite...
!