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Upgrading to a larger hard drive, need to move MS Office 2007

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August 9, 2012 6:20:00 PM

Hey Everyone,

I am trying to repair an HP Compaq computer for a friend, and I have found out that his current hard drive is pretty much full and when you run a program it kicks into hyper drive or something, lol. The only things I've done to it so far is a Disk Cleanup, Defrag, and ran Malewarebytes Anti-virus. Running Disk Cleanup and Malewarebytes is when I heard the hard drive take off and sound like a jet engine.

Now considering the hard drive runs so hard I figured he may want to replace it, lol. I've got a hard drive that I plan to give him. He has a windows XP home key on the computer case, but he nor I have XP home discs to do a reinstall. So, I've offered him my old XP Pro and he said do it.

My problem is I'm not sure how I can salvage the MS Office 2007 that is installed on his current hard drive. He is checking for installation discs, but I doubt he has them. I'm not sure if he has the product key either, but for the sake of the discussion let's all assume that he does, lol. I've come across a few programs that supposedly can detect the product key, but haven't tried anything yet.

Any ideas on how I can give him clean XP Pro install on a new (larger) hard drive and be able to install MS Office 2007 with a product key but no installation discs? Transferring files should be no problem as he will be connected to my network, or through a IDE to USB adapter.

(Sorry if this post is in the wrong forum, but I figured it's more a hard drive question rather than software since the software is working...)

Thanks!
August 9, 2012 6:54:16 PM

Download Macrium Reflect (free) from download.com.

Make an image of his current Hard Drive.

Restore the image to the new Hard Drive.

Problem solved.
August 9, 2012 7:03:28 PM

sierrareal1 said:
Download Macrium Reflect (free) from download.com.

Make an image of his current Hard Drive.

Restore the image to the new Hard Drive.

Problem solved.



This will image will keep the actual program intact? It doesn't restore only files, it will restore the programs these files were created with as well?
Related resources
August 10, 2012 4:25:26 PM

Aunnix said:
This will image will keep the actual program intact? It doesn't restore only files, it will restore the programs these files were created with as well?


This will provide an exact image of the HDD you are replacing (clone) and allow you to restore the image to the new HDD.

Everything should work exactly as it was on the old HDD.

Be sure to image the entire HDD. Read the instructions for Macrium Reflect thoroughly.

You will need to make a "restore disk" for the initial bootup, then you can restore from that.
August 10, 2012 5:01:32 PM

sierrareal1 said:
This will provide an exact image of the HDD you are replacing (clone) and allow you to restore the image to the new HDD.

Everything should work exactly as it was on the old HDD.

Be sure to image the entire HDD. Read the instructions for Macrium Reflect thoroughly.

You will need to make a "restore disk" for the initial bootup, then you can restore from that.




Good deal... Thanks! I will look into this over the weekend. I'm going to make sure I have installation discs for a XP before I attempt it though, lol. I want to be ready in case something doesn't go right.

I will keep everyone posted on my progress.
August 14, 2012 3:46:08 PM

sierrareal1 said:
This will provide an exact image of the HDD you are replacing (clone) and allow you to restore the image to the new HDD.

Everything should work exactly as it was on the old HDD.

Be sure to image the entire HDD. Read the instructions for Macrium Reflect thoroughly.

You will need to make a "restore disk" for the initial bootup, then you can restore from that.



Question... do I need to reformat the old hard drive or delete the windows installation before I can use the restore cd on the new hard drive?

It seems a bit conflicting be able to clone a HDD and restore those settings onto another HDD while the old HDD OS and programs are still installed on it.
August 14, 2012 4:19:45 PM

Aunnix said:
Question... do I need to reformat the old hard drive or delete the windows installation before I can use the restore cd on the new hard drive?

It seems a bit conflicting be able to clone a HDD and restore those settings onto another HDD while the old HDD OS and programs are still installed on it.


Q1: While it is not necessary to format the drive that you are going to restore the image onto, I would. It certainly makes for less possibility of a problem if you're going to put the new image onto a "clean" surface.

Q2 (? sort of): Exactly. While the image that you are restoring is an exact copy of an entire drive/disc, with the exact partitions and the exact files, I would think that having the target free of any old remnants of other installations would be preferable to having to overwrite all that information.

Just a final note:

I suggested Macrium Reflect Free because it is a program I'm familiar with, and you didn't provide specifics about the drives you are working with.

It should be noted that if you are using a Seagate HDD as a target, they will allow you to download and use SeaTools from their website. SeaTools has a much simpler, no frills "disc clone" application that will make an exact copy of the source disc and copy it to a new Seagate drive with virtually no fuss. The easiest I've ever used, especially if you can have both drives plugged in and running at the same time.

If your target drive is a Western Digital, you can download Acronis WD from their website and clone your source disc and migrate it with very little difficulty also.

Both are free downloads for their customers.

Good luck.
a c 354 G Storage
August 14, 2012 7:05:32 PM

I've used reflect before. It will do the job. Here are some steps to help protect you.

1. after creating your backup image, remove the original drive and put the new drive in it's place. Put the original drive in a safe place until you are sure all is working well.

2. Boot from the reflect boot cd/dvd and restore your image to the new drive.

3. Boot from the new drive and make sure all is well.

4. Add in your original drive, leaving your new drive as is. If you don't need any data on this drive, format it and use it as a storage drive.

By following these steps, you avoid having to switch the boot drive in the BIOS. This also makes sure you don't accidently restore the image over top the old drive. Normally, this is safe, but if something does go wrong, it will protect your original disk - no harm, no foul.

If you don't like macrium reflect, you can also clone your drive using clonezilla.
August 14, 2012 7:47:22 PM

1946048,8,60814 said:
I've used reflect before. It will do the job. Here are some steps to help protect you. . .

Thanks for the additional notes Hawkeye.

You sound like you've had some experience with swapping drives and cloning.

Maybe you could answer a question of mine:

"http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/818-71-running-backup..."

I'm planning to try Paragon. Do you have any experience with that?
a c 354 G Storage
August 14, 2012 8:12:13 PM

I have no experience with Paragon, but most backup software works pretty much the same. It's just a matter of how the options are displayed and how they read.

I think you are just over analyzing the situation. Cloning is a pretty simple process. As long as you protect the original drive until you are done, you have a way to bring your system back online quickly.
August 14, 2012 9:02:53 PM

sierrareal1 said:
Q1: While it is not necessary to format the drive that you are going to restore the image onto, I would. It certainly makes for less possibility of a problem if you're going to put the new image onto a "clean" surface.


Yeah, this was my plan. I figured it's safer and quicker to "clean" the new HDD of any old files or programs.

sierrareal1 said:
Q2 (? sort of): Exactly. While the image that you are restoring is an exact copy of an entire drive/disc, with the exact partitions and the exact files, I would think that having the target free of any old remnants of other installations would be preferable to having to overwrite all that information.


By this, I was wondering if I would have problems ebcause essentially after loading the image onto the new HDD I now have two copies / versions of the OS and programs installed. I was afraid this will cause problems when booting up the computer with the new HDD, because I'm now running cd keys / serial numbers on TWO machines (so it seems to me, lol). I don't want to start a program and be told the serial number or something is invalid and me not be able to find the serials / cd keys for the programs.


sierrareal1 said:
Just a final note:

I suggested Macrium Reflect Free because it is a program I'm familiar with, and you didn't provide specifics about the drives you are working with.

It should be noted that if you are using a Seagate HDD as a target, they will allow you to download and use SeaTools from their website. SeaTools has a much simpler, no frills "disc clone" application that will make an exact copy of the source disc and copy it to a new Seagate drive with virtually no fuss. The easiest I've ever used, especially if you can have both drives plugged in and running at the same time.

If your target drive is a Western Digital, you can download Acronis WD from their website and clone your source disc and migrate it with very little difficulty also.

Both are free downloads for their customers.

Good luck.


I'm not real sure what the drives are actually. They are a GOOD few years old. I will see if I can figure it out tonight. I do believe one of the is Western Digital... Thanks for the help.
August 14, 2012 9:07:55 PM

Hawkeye22 said:
I've used reflect before. It will do the job. Here are some steps to help protect you.

1. after creating your backup image, remove the original drive and put the new drive in it's place. Put the original drive in a safe place until you are sure all is working well.

2. Boot from the reflect boot cd/dvd and restore your image to the new drive.

3. Boot from the new drive and make sure all is well.

4. Add in your original drive, leaving your new drive as is. If you don't need any data on this drive, format it and use it as a storage drive.

By following these steps, you avoid having to switch the boot drive in the BIOS. This also makes sure you don't accidently restore the image over top the old drive. Normally, this is safe, but if something does go wrong, it will protect your original disk - no harm, no foul.

If you don't like macrium reflect, you can also clone your drive using clonezilla.



Thanks much! I will be sure to consider this post when I begin the cloning. The computer in question is older HP Compaq, so I don't think it has room for the second HDD as extra storage.. I was basically going to install the new HDD and keep the old one. Either sell it or keep it for testing or something, I dont know..
August 14, 2012 11:42:37 PM

Quote:
By this, I was wondering if I would have problems ebcause essentially after loading the image onto the new HDD I now have two copies / versions of the OS and programs installed.


I get what you're asking now.

When you move the image to the "new" drive, it will overwrite the information that is on that drive. You will not have "two copies/versions of the OS" because it will install to the primary partition. The only way you could end up with two copies of the OS would be if you re-partition the drive prior to restoring the image, and then restore the image to the new partition. This would leave you with a "dual boot" configuration. This is handy if you want to run two different versions of windows on one machine, or if you wanted to run two different OS's, but for what you want to do it wouldn't seem like a practical idea.

Re-partitioning is a destructive process, unless you use a program that will allow you to create a partition without destroying the data on a current partition.

Formatting is simply taking the process a step further by actually setting the segments and clusters to a "clean" state ready to be written to.

You should also run a chkdsk on the drive that you are going to write the new image onto, just to make sure that it has no bad sectors.

Again, best of luck.



August 14, 2012 11:56:22 PM

sierrareal1 said:
Quote:
By this, I was wondering if I would have problems ebcause essentially after loading the image onto the new HDD I now have two copies / versions of the OS and programs installed.


I get what you're asking now.

When you move the image to the "new" drive, it will overwrite the information that is on that drive. You will not have "two copies/versions of the OS" because it will install to the primary partition. The only way you could end up with two copies of the OS would be if you re-partition the drive prior to restoring the image, and then restore the image to the new partition. This would leave you with a "dual boot" configuration. This is handy if you want to run two different versions of windows on one machine, or if you wanted to run two different OS's, but for what you want to do it wouldn't seem like a practical idea.

Re-partitioning is a destructive process, unless you use a program that will allow you to create a partition without destroying the data on a current partition.

Formatting is simply taking the process a step further by actually setting the segments and clusters to a "clean" state ready to be written to.

You should also run a chkdsk on the drive that you are going to write the new image onto, just to make sure that it has no bad sectors.

Again, best of luck.



lol, Sorry. The two OS copies would be one on the new hard drive, and one the old hard drive... won't that conflict since all my system information is assigned to the old HDD already?
August 15, 2012 6:36:12 AM

Aunnix said:
lol, Sorry. The two OS copies would be one on the new hard drive, and one the old hard drive... won't that conflict since all my system information is assigned to the old HDD already?


Okay, now I'm confused.

Are you planning on having both HDD's installed on the system at the same time? I was under the impression that you weren't intending to do that.

If that is your plan, I would suggest doing it the way Hawkeye suggested. Format the old drive and use if for storage.

There isn't really any gain to having the same OS on two separate drives.

August 15, 2012 1:17:03 PM

sierrareal1 said:
Okay, now I'm confused.

Are you planning on having both HDD's installed on the system at the same time? I was under the impression that you weren't intending to do that.

If that is your plan, I would suggest doing it the way Hawkeye suggested. Format the old drive and use if for storage.

There isn't really any gain to having the same OS on two separate drives.



No not having both HDDs installed on the system at the same time. I was thinking that basically all of the programs' serial numbers / cd keys are tied to the current old HDD. If I copy all of it and put it on another HDD, will there be problems in running the programs because they are all tied to the old HDD?

Basically, the way I see it, is that I clone the old HDD and then restore the image to the new HDD... now, the OS and programs are still on the old HDD. When I go to use the programs on the new HDD, I feel like there will be issues in running the programs (or OS) because it and all of the programs' information are active on another HDD. So what I'm thinking is, what is stopping people from cloning their HDD and restoring the image to another HDD and running two computers which means they are using their serial numbers / keys twice when they can only be activated / registered once?
a c 354 G Storage
August 15, 2012 1:21:00 PM

Programs aren't tied to the hard drive. If you replace the current hard drive with the cloned drive all will be fine assuming the cloning process went well.
August 15, 2012 1:41:41 PM

Hawkeye22 said:
Programs aren't tied to the hard drive. If you replace the current hard drive with the cloned drive all will be fine assuming the cloning process went well.


Ok. It seemed a bit conflicting to me, because if I buy windows 7 and install it I've used the product key. It's done, can't do it anymore unless I reinstall that particular OS. Now, I can clone this HDD with windows 7 and restore everything to another HDD, and if that information is sent back to Microsoft (through system updates or something, I don't know...) they'll see that I'm using the OS' product key on two HDDs / systems. Then all of the heavens fall from the sky, blah, blah, blah because the almighty Microsoft was wronged, haha.

I was wondering if this would cause issues running programs on the HDD I do the image restore on (the new HDD I'm trying to upgrade him to)?
August 15, 2012 2:39:38 PM

Aunnix said:
Ok. It seemed a bit conflicting to me, because if I buy windows 7 and install it I've used the product key. It's done, can't do it anymore unless I reinstall that particular OS. Now, I can clone this HDD with windows 7 and restore everything to another HDD, and if that information is sent back to Microsoft (through system updates or something, I don't know...) they'll see that I'm using the OS' product key on two HDDs / systems. Then all of the heavens fall from the sky, blah, blah, blah because the almighty Microsoft was wronged, haha.

I was wondering if this would cause issues running programs on the HDD I do the image restore on (the new HDD I'm trying to upgrade him to)?


I understand your concern, but Hawkeye is correct. The programs/keys are not "tied" to the HDD. The only way that a problem with Microsoft arises is if you have two separate systems actively using the same products. If you took the current HDD out of your friends system and put it in another system (with all the programs still operational) and connected to the internet, THEN you would have a problem. The same key can not be used on two systems that Microsoft can "read" at the same time.

Basically you could probably get away with having it installed on two systems, as long as they were not both on at the same time. I don't think Microsoft cares if the systems are completely different, as long as they are not both "plugged in" and "reporting" at the same time.

And yes, it would be that easy for them to find out if they were.
August 15, 2012 2:54:44 PM

Hawkeye22 said:
I have no experience with Paragon, but most backup software works pretty much the same. It's just a matter of how the options are displayed and how they read.

I think you are just over analyzing the situation. Cloning is a pretty simple process. As long as you protect the original drive until you are done, you have a way to bring your system back online quickly.


Did you read my question at the link?

I'm not trying to simply restore a system. I want to use the image (either via VM, or mounting the image through some other method) to essentially create a "cloned system" that can meet my clients needs while I do work on their regular workstation. I then want to either be able to restore their system if it was simply a hardware upgrade, or restore their data if I had done an upgrade of the OS.

Paragon claims that you can use an image on another system with completely different hardware with their software.

The other reason I'm considering this is that my client often sends individuals for training on specific programs that are unique to their industry. They will use the new laptop as their "training" comp. I would like to be able to send them out to their class with (as close as possible) their system so they can see how the program runs on it. With all the flavors of Windows that are in use today, a novice can get completely disoriented when they "learn" to use a program on a Win 8 machine and they return to their office and have to "re-learn" it on Win XP. The differences can be significant.
August 15, 2012 3:00:50 PM

sierrareal1 said:
I understand your concern, but Hawkeye is correct. The programs/keys are not "tied" to the HDD. The only way that a problem with Microsoft arises is if you have two separate systems actively using the same products. If you took the current HDD out of your friends system and put it in another system (with all the programs still operational) and connected to the internet, THEN you would have a problem. The same key can not be used on two systems that Microsoft can "read" at the same time.

Basically you could probably get away with having it installed on two systems, as long as they were not both on at the same time. I don't think Microsoft cares if the systems are completely different, as long as they are not both "plugged in" and "reporting" at the same time.

And yes, it would be that easy for them to find out if they were.



Nice. That's the answer I was looking for on this issue, haha. Thanks. Sorry for all of the confusion, lol. Once I find a good program to pull the serial numbers / product keys from his system for any valuable programs, I will be attempting this cloning tomorrow evening.

Thanks for all of the help and I will keep you guys posted on my progress!


Oh, btw. I believe one HDD is a Hitachi (the bigger one I'm upgrading him to) and then old is a Western Digital.
August 15, 2012 3:22:32 PM

Aunnix said:
Nice. That's the answer I was looking for on this issue, haha. Thanks. Sorry for all of the confusion, lol. Once I find a good program to pull the serial numbers / product keys from his system for any valuable programs, I will be attempting this cloning tomorrow evening.

Thanks for all of the help and I will keep you guys posted on my progress!


Oh, btw. I believe one HDD is a Hitachi (the bigger one I'm upgrading him to) and then old is a Western Digital.


Final note:

I don't know how Western Digital would feel about you replacing their drive with a competitor, but fortunately for you it's not an issue, as WD now owns the Hitachi HDD division.

I would recommend actually using Acronis in this case. Free download at Western Digitals website.

The only other thing you need to do now is either using an external HDD or a Flash Drive (if you have one that is large enough, which you should as they are dirt cheap) make sure you've copied the "Documents and Settings" folder from the drive you're cloning. At least copy anything that your friend values. Tax returns, bank records, documents that are important, music, photos etc. It will be much easier to either simply move them back to the folders they are from if something goes wrong with the cloning process if they are simply saved in their native form.

Once again, best of luck.
August 15, 2012 3:29:27 PM

sierrareal1 said:
Final note:

I don't know how Western Digital would feel about you replacing their drive with a competitor, but fortunately for you it's not an issue, as WD now owns the Hitachi HDD division.

I would recommend actually using Acronis in this case. Free download at Western Digitals website.

The only other thing you need to do now is either using an external HDD or a Flash Drive (if you have one that is large enough, which you should as they are dirt cheap) make sure you've copied the "Documents and Settings" folder from the drive you're cloning. At least copy anything that your friend values. Tax returns, bank records, documents that are important, music, photos etc. It will be much easier to either simply move them back to the folders they are from if something goes wrong with the cloning process if they are simply saved in their native form.

Once again, best of luck.



Thanks! I did plan to at least backup any/all files some how. Probably by loading them onto my old computer through the USB to IDE/SATA adapter. I had a 16GB flash drive (still not large enough for his files) but it got shoved up under the dash in my car, lol. I've yet to tear it apart to get it out. So once I find his product key(s) and backup I'll look into Acronis and see if I'll run into issues with the different HDDs.
a c 354 G Storage
August 15, 2012 4:43:59 PM

sierrareal1 said:
Did you read my question at the link?

I'm not trying to simply restore a system. I want to use the image (either via VM, or mounting the image through some other method) to essentially create a "cloned system" that can meet my clients needs while I do work on their regular workstation. I then want to either be able to restore their system if it was simply a hardware upgrade, or restore their data if I had done an upgrade of the OS.

Paragon claims that you can use an image on another system with completely different hardware with their software.

The other reason I'm considering this is that my client often sends individuals for training on specific programs that are unique to their industry. They will use the new laptop as their "training" comp. I would like to be able to send them out to their class with (as close as possible) their system so they can see how the program runs on it. With all the flavors of Windows that are in use today, a novice can get completely disoriented when they "learn" to use a program on a Win 8 machine and they return to their office and have to "re-learn" it on Win XP. The differences can be significant.


Then you can't do what you want to do. You can't use both copies of the OS at the same time. That's a violation of the EULA.
August 15, 2012 6:24:38 PM

Hawkeye22 said:
Then you can't do what you want to do. You can't use both copies of the OS at the same time. That's a violation of the EULA.


Yes, I realize that, which is why I wouldn't be.

One system would be "offline", while I was performing maintenance or the user was in training.
August 17, 2012 12:28:35 AM

Is it possible to clone the old hard drive if I have it hooked up externally to another computer? Then, obviously burn the image of that "external" drive on the computer it is hooked up to then boot up on the new hard drive that's replacing the old 40GB one?
August 17, 2012 2:28:17 AM

Aunnix said:
Is it possible to clone the old hard drive if I have it hooked up externally to another computer? Then, obviously burn the image of that "external" drive on the computer it is hooked up to then boot up on the new hard drive that's replacing the old 40GB one?


I'm not exactly sure what you're asking.

You can use an external hard drive as a "boot" drive, but it would be significantly slower than the internal due to the bus speed reduction.

Or, are you asking how to set up the drives to do the cloning?

The best way to set it up is to plug the drive you are planing to clone to in to where the current HDD is. Plug the old HDD into the second plug for either the IDE bus or the SATA bus if you have a SATA available. Transferring the image to one drive and then to another gives you an extra step that could result in more errors. You want to keep it as simple as possible. Less to go wrong.
August 17, 2012 3:12:32 AM

sierrareal1 said:
I'm not exactly sure what you're asking.

You can use an external hard drive as a "boot" drive, but it would be significantly slower than the internal due to the bus speed reduction.

Or, are you asking how to set up the drives to do the cloning?

The best way to set it up is to plug the drive you are planing to clone to in to where the current HDD is. Plug the old HDD into the second plug for either the IDE bus or the SATA bus if you have a SATA available. Transferring the image to one drive and then to another gives you an extra step that could result in more errors. You want to keep it as simple as possible. Less to go wrong.



hmm.. so I'm going to have to have both hard drives hooked up at the same time during the cloning process? The computer is a HP Compaw D530, and only has the room for the one HDD. I don't know how I would hook up the second...

I was thinking I could create the ISO image on the old hard drive, then remove it and put in the new hard drive. Then boot from the ISO image on the CD created... is this not possible?

and my question was, I currently have the old HDD hooked up to my computer via IDE to USB adapter. I just completed transferring the files to have a backup in case cloning goes wrong. I was wondering if I could just clone that drive on my computer and then just install the new HDD and boot off the CD of the cloned drive?
August 17, 2012 3:17:32 AM

and am I supposed to be downloading the trial versions of these programs? I don't see a free download anywhere besides the trials...
August 17, 2012 3:42:19 AM

Aunnix said:
and am I supposed to be downloading the trial versions of these programs? I don't see a free download anywhere besides the trials...


I had seen your comment about there not being a second slot on the Compaq, but figured you were mistaken. That's just stunning, but that's why I haven't bought a Compaq in well over a decade.

Your computer likely has a double IDE plug, or you can buy one. You don't really have to mount the drive, just put it someplace it can sit level and stable. Or, if you prefer, you can do the cloning on your computer if your hardware is more "up to standard". IDE to USB would work I guess.

You certainly can burn the image to a CD or DVD, but that's a lot more time and potential for problems. Ultimately, you want to simply transfer everything off the old HDD and onto the new HDD. Anything else can be problematic.

Macrium Reflect free should be available at download.com. Acronis and Seatools are available on the Western Digital and Seagate sites respectively.
August 17, 2012 3:46:45 AM

sierrareal1 said:
I had seen your comment about there not being a second slot on the Compaq, but figured you were mistaken. That's just stunning, but that's why I haven't bought a Compaq in well over a decade.

Your computer likely has a double IDE plug, or you can buy one. You don't really have to mount the drive, just put it someplace it can sit level and stable. Or, if you prefer, you can do the cloning on your computer if your hardware is more "up to standard". IDE to USB would work I guess.

You certainly can burn the image to a CD or DVD, but that's a lot more time and potential for problems. Ultimately, you want to simply transfer everything off the old HDD and onto the new HDD. Anything else can be problematic.

Macrium Reflect free should be available at download.com. Acronis and Seatools are available on the Western Digital and Seagate sites respectively.



Well, here is a problem.. lol. the computer I'm running has one IDE slot and 4 SATA. The IDE cable is currently connected to one hard drive and the cd/dvd rom, lol. So, I can't hook up the two at once.

Is the CD/DVD rom needed if I transfer HDD to HDD? If not, I can unplug it and run both...
August 17, 2012 4:34:35 AM

Aunnix said:
Well, here is a problem.. lol. the computer I'm running has one IDE slot and 4 SATA. The IDE cable is currently connected to one hard drive and the cd/dvd rom, lol. So, I can't hook up the two at once.

Is the CD/DVD rom needed if I transfer HDD to HDD? If not, I can unplug it and run both...


The CD/DVD isn't needed at all to clone the HDD. That would be how I would do it.
August 17, 2012 12:55:54 PM

Ok, so since the HP Compaq computer (the computer being upgraded) doesn't allow enough hookups for the two hard drives I had to hook them up to my extra computer. I hooked up the old HDD and windows failed to start so I reset the computer then it started in safe mode (I think I hit F10 to cause this though). Then after another restart, windows actually did boot (using "last known good configuration" option), but the display was real choppy and the mouse was not working. (I do have the two computers hooked up to a KVM switch, but never these issues with either one before swapping HDDs)

So I hooked up my computer's original HDD and made a bootable media disc for Acronis.

Then, I hooked up the HP's old hard drive back in side the HP computer to see if it would boot correctly. It booted, and I get to my desktop, but after about 5-10 seconds the computer would restart.

So, I went ahead and pulled it back out and hooked it up to my computer again with the larger HDD that I'm going to be installing in the HP. I booted straight from the CD and ran the cloning process. At this point it was around 1am, so I let the cloning run through the night while I was in bed.

I've yet to check it, and won't be able to until about 6pm (US Eastern Time) tonight. I wanted to give you guys an update, and also ask, from the information provided do you believe I have messed something up? lol
August 17, 2012 3:59:19 PM

Aunnix said:
Ok, so since the HP Compaq computer (the computer being upgraded) doesn't allow enough hookups for the two hard drives I had to hook them up to my extra computer. I hooked up the old HDD and windows failed to start so I reset the computer then it started in safe mode (I think I hit F10 to cause this though). Then after another restart, windows actually did boot (using "last known good configuration" option), but the display was real choppy and the mouse was not working. (I do have the two computers hooked up to a KVM switch, but never these issues with either one before swapping HDDs)

So I hooked up my computer's original HDD and made a bootable media disc for Acronis.

Then, I hooked up the HP's old hard drive back in side the HP computer to see if it would boot correctly. It booted, and I get to my desktop, but after about 5-10 seconds the computer would restart.

So, I went ahead and pulled it back out and hooked it up to my computer again with the larger HDD that I'm going to be installing in the HP. I booted straight from the CD and ran the cloning process. At this point it was around 1am, so I let the cloning run through the night while I was in bed.

I've yet to check it, and won't be able to until about 6pm (US Eastern Time) tonight. I wanted to give you guys an update, and also ask, from the information provided do you believe I have messed something up? lol


Wow! Sorry you ran into so many difficulties. I don't really think you "messed something up", but I probably should have considered the issue of installing the "old drive" as the C: drive. It would likely have been easier for you to "boot" to the larger HDD (the "New" drive in our discussion) and then just run the cloning program from that drive. I should have been more clear about that, and I'm sorry for any problems caused by my oversight.

If everything went as planned, your new drive should be bootable in the Compaq, and it should be able to find all the drivers it needs with no problem. If something went wrong, I would suggest taking the old drive back out of your computer, install it in the Compaq, and do whatever needs to be done to get it back to its original configuration (perhaps going to "last known good" while it is in the Compaq), then redoing the clone process in your computer (booting from the CD).

The only thing that I can see that might have gone wrong is that the "old drive" might have tried to configure itself for your computer (not the Compaq) which could mean that some of the drivers might have been changed and may not work in the Compaq now. By re-installing it in the Compaq, you might be able to get those drivers back.

Hope this helps.
August 17, 2012 4:55:19 PM

sierrareal1 said:
Wow! Sorry you ran into so many difficulties. I don't really think you "messed something up", but I probably should have considered the issue of installing the "old drive" as the C: drive. It would likely have been easier for you to "boot" to the larger HDD (the "New" drive in our discussion) and then just run the cloning program from that drive. I should have been more clear about that, and I'm sorry for any problems caused by my oversight.

If everything went as planned, your new drive should be bootable in the Compaq, and it should be able to find all the drivers it needs with no problem. If something went wrong, I would suggest taking the old drive back out of your computer, install it in the Compaq, and do whatever needs to be done to get it back to its original configuration (perhaps going to "last known good" while it is in the Compaq), then redoing the clone process in your computer (booting from the CD).

The only thing that I can see that might have gone wrong is that the "old drive" might have tried to configure itself for your computer (not the Compaq) which could mean that some of the drivers might have been changed and may not work in the Compaq now. By re-installing it in the Compaq, you might be able to get those drivers back.

Hope this helps.



Hahah, no worries. Troubles are expected when doing something for the first time. I plan to test the (new) drive tonight to see if it will boot. If something did mess up, I'm pretty sure it's easily fixed (per your suggestions). And, I believe you are correct about the drivers, and here's why... lol

For my computer I bought a SATA drive a couple months back. Installed it in my computer and moved my old 160GB IDE drive to an old Dell computer to use as a backup computer for the garage (figured an old shitty dell would be ok to grease up and *** while working on cars or whatnot if I needed internet access, lol). Everything booted and ran, but the mouse and keyboard did not work and the monitor display color was all messed up and "gritty and grainy" looking. So, I put it back in the old computer (at this point I realized my PSU couldn't support the SATA drive) and started getting the dreaded BSOD (error code was something like 0x0000007E), haha. I tried for a good few weeks (even have a thread on here for the issues) and was never able to solve the issue.

Good thing was, all of the data was fine though... I bought an IDE to USB external adapter and hooked it up to the new computer (one I just built during all of this) and transferred the files with no problems. I played with the BSOD for a few more days but couldn't find anything useful and we were basically stumped on the thread I had started, lol. So, I just cut my losses and reformatted it (no biggie, I got my data).

Any suggestions on identifying the drivers that may have been changed? I assume I can redownload, update or repair them through the device manager or mobo software...
August 17, 2012 5:47:39 PM

Hard to say what drivers might have switched and what drivers may have stayed put, but you're right, it should be easy to identify in Device Manager.

Once you either rollback or reinstall the proper drivers (I suspect there may be issues with the bus drivers and likely the graphics, sound, and display) you should be good-to-go.
August 17, 2012 5:58:35 PM

sierrareal1 said:
Hard to say what drivers might have switched and what drivers may have stayed put, but you're right, it should be easy to identify in Device Manager.

Once you either rollback or reinstall the proper drivers (I suspect there may be issues with the bus drivers and likely the graphics, sound, and display) you should be good-to-go.



I definitely assumed graphics drivers since my computer has the Radeon HD 4650 in it and the HP is using on board. Perhaps I should just reinstall all of the Mobo drivers and see if that can fix this issue first? I'd hope reinstalling the the Mobo drivers would fix the bus drivers?
August 17, 2012 6:24:55 PM

Aunnix said:
I definitely assumed graphics drivers since my computer has the Radeon HD 4650 in it and the HP is using on board. Perhaps I should just reinstall all of the Mobo drivers and see if that can fix this issue first? I'd hope reinstalling the the Mobo drivers would fix the bus drivers?


That's a fair assumption. If all the drivers for the board got swapped, that would be where I would start.
August 17, 2012 6:32:14 PM

sierrareal1 said:
That's a fair assumption. If all the drivers for the board got swapped, that would be where I would start.



Cool. I will test the HDD with the cloned system and see what happens. If it doesn't work, I will find the HP Compaq drivers online and create a drivers disk / USB to access. Think I can just try to make the driver repair on the upgraded HDD or would I need to do it to the old HDD and clone it again (as you suggested above)?
August 17, 2012 6:46:45 PM

Aunnix said:
Cool. I will test the HDD with the cloned system and see what happens. If it doesn't work, I will find the HP Compaq drivers online and create a drivers disk / USB to access. Think I can just try to make the driver repair on the upgraded HDD or would I need to do it to the old HDD and clone it again (as you suggested above)?


I'm not sure about being able to do the repair on the upgraded HDD because you said you had a problem booting from it. If you can get it running to the point that it will stay operable on the system you are installing it on, you should be able to do the repairs and it should run on that system. If you did the repairs while it was in your other system I'm not sure they would install and run long enough to be able to swap it back. Which ever drive you can get to run on the system you intend to install the new drive in would be the one I would try to repair. Then I'd go from there.
August 17, 2012 7:06:31 PM

sierrareal1 said:
I'm not sure about being able to do the repair on the upgraded HDD because you said you had a problem booting from it. If you can get it running to the point that it will stay operable on the system you are installing it on, you should be able to do the repairs and it should run on that system. If you did the repairs while it was in your other system I'm not sure they would install and run long enough to be able to swap it back. Which ever drive you can get to run on the system you intend to install the new drive in would be the one I would try to repair. Then I'd go from there.



Sorry. The one I had problems booting from was the old (40GB) hard drive.

Basically, I had to hook up a SATA DVDROM to free up the IDE cable connection to run both the old (40GB) and the new (80GB) drives. 40GB was master (since it had the OS on it) and 80GB was slave.

I don't know why I thought this, but I figured since it was all hooked up I could just boot from the old 40GB hard drive and start the cloning without a boot disc since we said the DVDROM wasn't needed (above). This is what loaded the conflicting drivers...

So, I removed the 40GB and 80GB drives. Reinstalled my drive that I had in the computer and created the Acronis boot disc. While it was burning, I put the old 40GB back into the HP Compaq to see if I would get the 0x0000007E BSOD. Well, no blue screen and Windows did boot, but the mintor display was all choppy and pixelated and the mouse and keyboard didn't work. After about 5-10 seconds of it showing the desktop, the computer restarts.

So, I pulled the 40GB out and hooked up the 40GB and 80GB to my computer again (the boot disc was created). Started up and booted from the DVDROM and did the clone over night. Now, I just need to see if the 80GB will work or if the driver problem carried over (which I assume it did)...
!