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I5 750 or dual core

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August 19, 2010 11:55:35 AM

Hello,
I saw a thread titled very similar to this one, but it didnt answer my questions completely. So, another thread.

I am planning to build a new PC. My usage is largely as below:

1. Software development work such as builds of moderate size software. Include mathematical calculations & simulation work using tools like Octave/Scilab.
2. Streaming high bitrate music daily. I plan to buy a hifi audio card as part of my computer.
3. Watching movies occasionally on a 20" screen I plan to buy.
4. Playing games (rarely graphics intense Quake type games, but the occasional bike race, FIFA, and strategy/Age of Empires type). This taste could always change in the future to include graphics intense games.
5. Learning photo editing.

The problem is I am torn between going with a Dual core such as a high clock speed Core2Duo, and the i5 750/760. I am getting a good deal on the i5, but will still probably save about $100 on processor + mobo if I go with the Dual core. I am also concerned about whether I need to add other things if I choose the i5. For eg, I will probably need a costlier cabinet/more powerful SMPS/better cooling/DDR3 RAM. So, overall system cost will be much higher. I am not sure if my applications will need the higher configuration.

Also, I would like to dual boot between Win XP and Windows 7, if I choose the i5. This is because I have some debuggers whose drivers may not be readily available for Windows 7.

Do you think the i5 is worth the extra cost? Or should I add more DDR2 RAM and the best sound card/graphics card I can afford instead?

thanks,
karth

More about : 750 dual core

August 19, 2010 12:00:07 PM

Forgot to hard that cooling is an issue because of the fan sounds. I plan to use this PC to play hifi music, and would like to keep fan sounds to a minimum.
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August 19, 2010 12:02:13 PM

i5. Eyes closed. Would serve the purpose mentioned better than any Dual Core would. The lower clock speeds on the i5 doesnt mean its slow. Its miles ahead of the previous generation of the Core 2 Duo's. Except a few Core 2 Quads may perform equally.
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a c 133 à CPUs
August 19, 2010 12:04:04 PM

No sense of even looking at any core 2 cpu's get the I5 and don't look back.
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August 29, 2010 5:00:42 PM

Thanks for your replies.

Due to availability and a lot of weighing different factors (i5 750 out of stock, i5 760 available and about $20 more, i3 540 uses the newer 32nm process and should consume lesser power, can add a great audio card and graphics card with this setup soon), I finally went with an i3 540 and an Intel DH55TC mobo. Added a Cooler Master 600 W SMPS, Transcend 4GB RAM, Seagate 1TB Barracuda HDD and Samsung SyncMaster 943 monitor.

The i3540 was a compromise candidate for me; I read reviews saying it was great VFM, and in the 2 odd weeks I have had it, the PC has been good to work with. Great thing is it has been totally quiet (zero noise). This was important to me, as I use the PC as source in a hi-fi setup.

Will post a review on this forum after a couple of months about this setup.

cheers,
karth
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a c 81 à CPUs
August 29, 2010 7:26:55 PM

Spend the max amount you can on the CPU and the motherboard.. Rest of the components can be upgraded in time at your own pace.. I too vote for the i5 760.. Don't get trapped with the high clock speed gimmick.. Clock speeds can be increased but cores cannot be generated (and btw, the i5 760 is a great overclocker)..
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a c 473 à CPUs
August 29, 2010 9:57:39 PM

karth said:

I am planning to build a new PC. My usage is largely as below:

1. Software development work such as builds of moderate size software. Include mathematical calculations & simulation work using tools like Octave/Scilab.
2. Streaming high bitrate music daily. I plan to buy a hifi audio card as part of my computer.
3. Watching movies occasionally on a 20" screen I plan to buy.
4. Playing games (rarely graphics intense Quake type games, but the occasional bike race, FIFA, and strategy/Age of Empires type). This taste could always change in the future to include graphics intense games.
5. Learning photo editing.



1. Mathematical calcs will benefit from quad core over dual cores as long as the programs are multi-threaded.
2. Multi-core CPUs are not necessary.
3. Only Blu-Ray and video encoded with H.264 or x.264 will require a dual core CPU.
4. Either Anandtech or Xbitlabs did a comparison of various current games on multi-core CPUs. Many take advantage of dual core, however, there are several that can take advantage of a 3rd core. None takes advantage of the 4th core though. The performance increase from two to three cores is not substantial, probably 10% - 15% gain at most depending on the game. So while dual core CPUs are enough for all games, the shift to more than two cores is under way.
5. I would say dual core is enough for photo editing.
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August 29, 2010 10:16:47 PM

Might be wise to wait for Sandy Bridge...
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