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2560 x 1600 resolution monitors vs 1920x1080p monitors

Last response: in Graphics & Displays
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May 15, 2010 5:01:43 AM

Which is a better monitor for gaming? Why is the resolution on these newer models larger than the HD Standards itself. I assumed nothing was clearer than 1080p. Guess I could be wrong.
May 15, 2010 6:29:55 AM

2560 x 1600 = 16:10 aspect ratio = computing and gaming.
1920 x 1080 = 16:9 aspect ratio = watching movies and videos, also it is the newer generation of desktop monitors.

2560 x 1600 is typically found on 30" or greater LCD monitors, and are relatively expensive, and such a resolution completely destroys most graphic cards. I suggest you buy a 1080p monitor instead. If you have the money though, a 2560 x 1600 would be nice I suppose.
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May 15, 2010 3:27:44 PM

Lmeow said:
2560 x 1600 is typically found on 30" or greater LCD monitors, and are relatively expensive, and such a resolution completely destroys most graphic cards.


True, but it's an exact multiple of 1280x800, so that resolution looks better than most non-native resolutions on a 1920x1080 or 1920x1200 monitor (some older games don't upscale the text and controls at high resolutions, so it may be better to run them at moderately low resolution). If you've got the desk space and the money, I suggest you go for the 2560x1600 monitor. If you've got enough cash left over for a enthusiast-level video card (or two), and can deal with the heat output (a 30 incher plus a 4870 X2 increased the ambient temperature to uncomfortable levels for me), you might actually be able to play games at 2560x1600. If not, outputting games at 1280x800 or 1920x1200 on such a monitor looks pretty good, and having the desktop at 2560x1600 has its advantages.

Note that 2560x1600 isn't the newest top resolution. I think they're out of production now, but there have been monitors that run at 3840x2400 (22 inch, price around 17 thousand) and 3840x2160 (56 inch, price around 45 thousand)
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May 16, 2010 12:34:25 PM

Ed4ueternally said:
Which is a better monitor for gaming? Why is the resolution on these newer models larger than the HD Standards itself. I assumed nothing was clearer than 1080p. Guess I could be wrong.


GAMING:
YES 2560x1600 on games that support it...

2560x1600 will require the high end card to get its full potential. Couple with the high end card (i.e. 5970, single or CF) you definitely get a better gaming quality than 1080P.

Yes 2560x1600 will be better if you have the right video card to drive it. Some games still make it difficult to support that resolution with high AA settings.


Look at eyefinity and the features that it offers in gaming environment. Its another option with wider field of view.

At that level the amount of investment becomes a big factor of consideration. Its a personal choice or preference.
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May 16, 2010 1:10:10 PM

For the money, I would pair up a good Eyefinity card with 3x 1920x1080 monitors before I would pay for a 2560x1600 monitor. It is cheaper and has more real estate, if the bezels don't drive you completely crazy.
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May 24, 2010 6:04:11 PM

Best answer selected by Ed4ueternally.
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May 24, 2010 6:23:48 PM

Yeah, 2560x1600 monitors are obscenely expensive($1k+) They will be larger and give you more detail than 1080p if you can afford it though. Add on the expense of a card that can handle the resolution. One HD5850 would be great for 1080p but you'll want at least 2 in crossfire or an HD5970 for 2560x1600.
Jofa's suggestion of eyefinity as a cheaper alternative to a 2560x1600 monitor is also a good one.
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May 24, 2010 6:27:25 PM

Yes Leon, hi my names Edward. Thanks for passing me your knowledge, on what you think about the 2560x1600 resolution. I really do like the 1080p resolution, and would not see the need in investing oooddllllees of money in a 2560x1600 monitor, or a Graphics capable card for that matter. I do have 2 1080p monitors, and both are Vizios, one is a 47 inch LCD LED or Model #SV472XVT. The other is a 37 inch LCD or Model #VO370M. So far Vizio, has given me top notch picture quality, on both the LED and the Eco friendly 37 inch one. I have come to adapt to Vizio technology rather well. I am building a PC here shortly "for the second time in my life" lol, and will more than likely utilize both sets, with the new PC. I may also need your help with something. For one, I am new to overclocking and would definitely not want to screw up my new hardware. Second, I am going with the Intel i7 930 chip, and a "EVGA Intel X58 Socket 1366 ATX X58 SLI LE Motherboard 141-BL-E757-TR". My first build used an AMD dual core, with no overclocking. Isn't there a way Leon, that this is made easier by not delving into Bios, but by having some sort of utility that manages the settings for you. Your reply is greatly appreciated.

leon2006 said:
GAMING:
YES 2560x1600 on games that support it...

2560x1600 will require the high end card to get its full potential. Couple with the high end card (i.e. 5970, single or CF) you definitely get a better gaming quality than 1080P.

Yes 2560x1600 will be better if you have the right video card to drive it. Some games still make it difficult to support that resolution with high AA settings.


Look at eyefinity and the features that it offers in gaming environment. Its another option with wider field of view.

At that level the amount of investment becomes a big factor of consideration. Its a personal choice or preference.

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May 24, 2010 6:43:28 PM

What you have are not in fact computer monitors but rather HDTVs. They will be fine for gaming but you may want to get a more appropriately sized screen for regular computing purposes.
Overclocking a video card should be done through software in windows but for the processor itself you would want to use the BIOS.
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May 24, 2010 6:54:29 PM

Thanks for the info. Do you know the basics, and specifics of overclocking the i7 930. If so, could you please pass this on to me. It will be greatly appreciated.


jyjjy said:
What you have are not in fact computer monitors but rather HDTVs. They will be fine for gaming but you may want to get a more appropriately sized screen for regular computing purposes.
Overclocking a video card should be done through software in windows but for the processor itself you would want to use the BIOS.

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May 24, 2010 7:00:05 PM

I have a nice 18.5" inch Sceptre 720p LED LCD TV coming for my computing needs. So yeah, I've got that down packed.

jyjjy said:
What you have are not in fact computer monitors but rather HDTVs. They will be fine for gaming but you may want to get a more appropriately sized screen for regular computing purposes.
Overclocking a video card should be done through software in windows but for the processor itself you would want to use the BIOS.

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May 24, 2010 8:03:34 PM

Eyefinity is not a replacement for 2560*1600 unless you are talking about desktop work, even in desktop there are differences.

In desktop applications like photoshop, you really don't want to muck around across those bezels and perhaps different monitors due to color variations. Still eyefinity lacks vertical pixels so you still need to scroll up and down for large images.

For web browsing I would say 2560*1600 is better since many web pages, even this one is designed to fit 1024 pixel monitors. Extra horizontal pixels isn't doing that much good compared to vertical pixels so you can see more of the page at a time.

Now for gaming, 2560*1600 makes the image sharper and more clear. Think of a 2x zoom with the same field of view. So when you look down a sniper scope and things would look twice as big.

Eyefinity for gaming doesn't increase image sharpness and clarity. It would be no zoom but larger field of view around the sides. Things won't be easier to shoot but it would be harder to get ninjaed from the side. The support for eyefinity resolutions at this moment is pretty bad. Not many games support it and I don't forsee many games will support it because it is unfair.

As for price. It really depends on what type of monitor you are going for. All 30" 2560*1600 monitors are top end IPS or MVA panels which has much better color fidelity and viewing angle good for professional work. It is also great for movies and games since IPS panels can display up to 16.7 million true color. At 30" large viewing angle is a must otherwise you get color distortion around the edges.

Cheap 24" monitors on the other hand are TN panels. Not really good for anything except they are cheapt to manufacture. They are limited to a 256k color pallet so they must mix colors to simulate a 16.7 million color pallet. The difference is really pronounced if you compare to a IPS panel. TN panels have dreadful viewing angle, but I guess it would be fine if you tilted the eyefinity monitors.

If you buy multiple 24" IPS panels, they would amount to a similar price as a 30" IPS panel so it really isn't all that expensive.
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May 24, 2010 8:24:20 PM

Obviously Eyefinity and a single larger screen are not the same. As for whether or not it increases sharpness that really depends on the aspect ratio you are using. Eyefinity can be used with the monitors turned on their side to create a 3240x1920 display. In that case yes, the image displayed will in fact effectively by a higher resolution in terms of sharpness of detail over a 2560x1600 display.
As for the question of "fairness" that only applies to competitive online gaming and really similar arguments can be made for people having a higher resolution monitor or a better video card/internet connection. But whatever, it is not going to stop game companies from supporting the technology and there are already a lot of games that support Eyefinity. Some have some issues but going forward most games will likely take Eyefinity into account and there will be fewer problems.
Considering he already has 2 large 1080p HDTVs adding another for Eyefinity would be an interesting thing to do. Gaming on three screens that large would be crazy.
@OP: Here are some videos of Eyefinity in action so you can see what it can do;
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dR7cNLUqPao&#t=150
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5UeHJEeuLc8#t=20
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Mn9Hhh3awK0
Searching Eyefinity on youtube will give you tons more.
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